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  1. #1
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    New Garmin Edge 500

    Announced today on the Garmin Blog.


    Weighing a mere 2 ounces, Garmin's newly announced Edge 500 cycling GPS features a high-sensitivity GPS receiver, requires no calibration, can be switched quickly and easily between bicycles and connects wirelessly with ANT+™ compatible third-party power meters. “Using feedback from the best focus group imaginable – the Pro Tour cyclists of Team Garmin-Slipstream, we’ve developed a lightweight cycling computer that’s powerful enough for the pros yet simple enough for beginners,” said Dan Bartel, Garmin’s vice president of worldwide sales.

    “Since becoming our title sponsor, Garmin has guaranteed that we have the best technology available,” said Team Garmin’s Christian Vande Velde, fresh off his top-8 finish in France in July. “At training camp we made requests: we wanted a smaller device with a big screen, easy-to-use buttons and sturdier mount. Garmin listened. The Edge 500 reflects our requests and then some, adding vertical speed, accurate calories and temperature readings.”
    Looks like an ANT+ capable 305 with black and white and no map upload ability. Roadies with power meters rejoice!
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  2. #2
    Scott in Tucson
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    Thanks for the heads up. Looks like most MTBers can skip this one. 2 ounces is pretty light, though!
    Author of TopoFusion GPS Software. MTB+backpacking = bikepacking.net. Ride Diary.

  3. #3
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    Not sure if this is roadies only, I honestly never use the mapping function while riding. This has the new calorie calculation, outside temp and the same accessory inputs as the 705. Also the new more secure bike mount. Seems like a great unit if you want 705 functionality but do not need color maps and want to pay less than half the price.

    Also, has claimed 18 hour battery life, which would be good if one can get that much (tracking a 12 hour race or an epic event would be cool).
    Geoff Stahl
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  4. #4
    Scott in Tucson
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    Good points.
    Author of TopoFusion GPS Software. MTB+backpacking = bikepacking.net. Ride Diary.

  5. #5
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    While I may not use the map function of the 705 on familiar rides, I do use it on unfamiliar ones. I would pass on this GPS...because I need/want the map screen and/or the trackback function when I'm at a new place, especially one with no paper maps, signs, and a confusing network of trails. This thing is just a very expensive basic cycling computer that happens to get its data from GPS instead of a wheel sensor. While maybe not just roadies would use it, I expect most buyers of this receiver would be roadies.

    Quote Originally Posted by gstahl
    Not sure if this is roadies only, I honestly never use the mapping function while riding. This has the new calorie calculation, outside temp and the same accessory inputs as the 705. Also the new more secure bike mount. Seems like a great unit if you want 705 functionality but do not need color maps and want to pay less than half the price.

    Also, has claimed 18 hour battery life, which would be good if one can get that much (tracking a 12 hour race or an epic event would be cool).

  6. #6
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    So when does the 705 replacement come out? Answer - likely tomorrow since my 705 just got delivered by fedex today lol

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    While I may not use the map function of the 705 on familiar rides, I do use it on unfamiliar ones. I would pass on this GPS...because I need/want the map screen and/or the trackback function when I'm at a new place, especially one with no paper maps, signs, and a confusing network of trails. This thing is just a very expensive basic cycling computer that happens to get its data from GPS instead of a wheel sensor. While maybe not just roadies would use it, I expect most buyers of this receiver would be roadies.

    While I have used the mapping a couple of times, the vast majority of my rides are now in familiar territory where I never even look at the maps. I am using my 705 more as a bike computer with the benefit of logging stats and maps on the computer to see which routes I took. I would have given this a serious look when I bought the 705 and on paper would recommend it to anyone who isn't exploring new trails.

  8. #8
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    This looks to be a downgrade from the 305.

    Looking at the specs... no route or waypoint storage, no virtual partner, workouts, pace alerts, interval training.

    So it's got better battery life and can talk with wireless power meters but it strips a bunch of features in the process. I also think the unit looks kinda ugly, I like the look of my 305 better, but that's subjective

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gstahl
    Not sure if this is roadies only, I honestly never use the mapping function while riding. This has the new calorie calculation, outside temp and the same accessory inputs as the 705. Also the new more secure bike mount. Seems like a great unit if you want 705 functionality but do not need color maps and want to pay less than half the price.

    Also, has claimed 18 hour battery life, which would be good if one can get that much (tracking a 12 hour race or an epic event would be cool).
    I think it has a place for everyone. My roadies rejoice comment was with friends who wanted a GPS with ANT+ for their power taps, but did not want the price of the 705 or need that mapping ability.

    It would work just like my 305 that went for almost four years, and it will work great. I am just spoiled now with the 705 since it will do everything I want AND give me good navigation and route finding when I need it.

    The features and price make it a winner, I have no doubt.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  10. #10
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    Does it have a barometric altimeter? If not, the cumulative altitude is going to be way off; better off with a 305.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee
    Does it have a barometric altimeter? If not, the cumulative altitude is going to be way off; better off with a 305.
    Yes. Click here.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  12. #12
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    I'll pass on this. It seems a bit silly to me to release a new GPS computer that doesn't do what GPS is best at: recording routes, and following routes.

    The newish Forerunner 310XT seems like a much better bike computer. It does routes, workout functions, has ANT+ power compatibility, and longer battery life that the new Edge 500. AND you can wear it on your wrist for other activities if you wish.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelMan
    I'll pass on this. It seems a bit silly to me to release a new GPS computer that doesn't do what GPS is best at: recording routes, and following routes.
    Read the Garmin page carefully, it records a track and you can compare different rides over the same course. You can upload rides to GTC and Connect for analysis, you just cannot set waypoints or upload them, and you cannot upload a track to the unit as a route to follow. It is still a GPS that records a track though.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Read the Garmin page carefully, it records a track and you can compare different rides over the same course. You can upload rides to GTC and Connect for analysis, you just cannot set waypoints or upload them, and you cannot upload a track to the unit as a route to follow. It is still a GPS that records a track though.
    Fair point. The Edge 500 will record. For me the inability to follow a course (route, track whatever one calls it) is a deal breaker. As far as I can tell it doesn't do that? I don't need a fancy map display like the Edge 705etc, but do want the ability to upload a course to the unit, and follow it using a simple direction arrow and basic navigation info such as distance remaining. I use this a lot on the mtb and on the road.

    My forerunner 405 does most of what I want -- but the interface is awful and battery life too short.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelMan
    Fair point. The Edge 500 will record. For me the inability to follow a course (route, track whatever one calls it) is a deal breaker. As far as I can tell it doesn't do that? I don't need a fancy map display like the Edge 705etc, but do want the ability to upload a course to the unit, and follow it using a simple direction arrow and basic navigation info such as distance remaining. I use this a lot on the mtb and on the road.

    My forerunner 405 does most of what I want -- but the interface is awful and battery life too short.
    TwoWheelMan, can you help answer this question I posted in another thread? I'm trying to find out if the Forerunner 305 will let me do what you are describing. I just want something to tell me when I am off track or took a wrong turn. Only need it on about 10% of the rides - the rest is on trails I know well.

    perhaps the 310 is a better choice now?

    Thanks very much in advance.

    EJ

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    Quote Originally Posted by ejfiii
    TwoWheelMan, can you help answer this question I posted in another thread? I'm trying to find out if the Forerunner 305 will let me do what you are describing. I just want something to tell me when I am off track or took a wrong turn. Only need it on about 10% of the rides - the rest is on trails I know well.

    perhaps the 310 is a better choice now?

    Thanks very much in advance.

    EJ
    I don't have the 305, but I checked the PDF of the manual and it is very similar to my 405 in navigation features. Actually the 305 is a bit better, in that it actually has a rudimentary map view of your uploaded course, which shows your current position in relation to the course (it doesn't have a basemap though, so there is no detail about topography or streets).

    So, the answer is yes, the 305 should do what you want. You can upload a previous course, or create a new course on your computer** and upload it to the 305. Then, select 'Do Course' on the 305, and choose the desired course. Using a direction arrow, the 305 will tell you which direction you should be going to stay on a course. If you get off the course, it will tell you which direction to go to get back on the course. Or you can use the rudimentary map view to see if you are north, south, east etc of your course.

    The Forerunner 310 looks nice but you may not need it's features: display and recording of power data from a PowerTap etc, longer battery life, and sufficient waterproofness for swimming.

    The Forerunner 405 would do what you want too, but the touch bezel interface is BS. And the battery life with the GPS on is <8hrs, which is too short for a lot of what I do on the bike.

    Have fun with it.

    ** If you end up getting a Forerunner, I recommend checking out SportTracks software for downloading and storing your rides and courses. Much better than Garmin's software in my experience.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelMan
    Fair point. The Edge 500 will record. For me the inability to follow a course (route, track whatever one calls it) is a deal breaker. As far as I can tell it doesn't do that? I don't need a fancy map display like the Edge 705etc, but do want the ability to upload a course to the unit, and follow it using a simple direction arrow and basic navigation info such as distance remaining. I use this a lot on the mtb and on the road.

    My forerunner 405 does most of what I want -- but the interface is awful and battery life too short.
    Agreed. If I was buying now and to choose between the 305 and 500, the 305 would win hands down. Now that I have a 705 and my first GPS was a 60CSx, for me the 705 is the best choice, but I am a map geek.

    Quote Originally Posted by ejfiii
    TwoWheelMan, can you help answer this question I posted in another thread? I'm trying to find out if the Forerunner 305 will let me do what you are describing. I just want something to tell me when I am off track or took a wrong turn. Only need it on about 10% of the rides - the rest is on trails I know well.

    perhaps the 310 is a better choice now?

    Thanks very much in advance.

    EJ
    Don't trust my answer eh?

    I did some further research for you. The Edge 305 and Forerunner 305 share the same basic chipset and functions (305 = 305). The screen size and antennas are different, and the form factor obviously but all functions are the same. So definitive YES that you can upload courses and follow them. You have to check the screen though to see if you make the right turn or go off route.
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  18. #18
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    Thank you both so much - I really appreciate it.

    Slocaus - I was waiting and hoping someone else might follow up your post.

    Again - thank you both for the help!

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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Agreed. If I was buying now and to choose between the 305 and 500, the 305 would win hands down. Now that I have a 705 and my first GPS was a 60CSx, for me the 705 is the best choice, but I am a map geek.
    I wouldn't mind a 705 one bit (or whatever Garmin comes up with next) I use my 60CSx on my motorbike, car, hiking, and once in a blue moon for riding. The Forerunner is a nice complement for my purposes, and used for most aerobic activities... small, wristable if needed, and minimal but just enough navigation.

    Back on topic.. I do think that this new 500 would have been perfect for a lot of road riders if it had had basic nav...

    when it comes down to it though... all these gadgets are pretty amazing!

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelMan
    I don't have the 305, but I checked the PDF of the manual and it is very similar to my 405 in navigation features. Actually the 305 is a bit better, in that it actually has a rudimentary map view of your uploaded course, which shows your current position in relation to the course (it doesn't have a basemap though, so there is no detail about topography or streets).

    So, the answer is yes, the 305 should do what you want. You can upload a previous course, or create a new course on your computer** and upload it to the 305. Then, select 'Do Course' on the 305, and choose the desired course. Using a direction arrow, the 305 will tell you which direction you should be going to stay on a course. If you get off the course, it will tell you which direction to go to get back on the course. Or you can use the rudimentary map view to see if you are north, south, east etc of your course.

    The Forerunner 310 looks nice but you may not need it's features: display and recording of power data from a PowerTap etc, longer battery life, and sufficient waterproofness for swimming.

    The Forerunner 405 would do what you want too, but the touch bezel interface is BS. And the battery life with the GPS on is <8hrs, which is too short for a lot of what I do on the bike.

    Have fun with it.

    ** If you end up getting a Forerunner, I recommend checking out SportTracks software for downloading and storing your rides and courses. Much better than Garmin's software in my experience.
    Hey, I just wanted to follow up on this, being that I've owned both the Forerunner 405 and Forerunner 305. For navigation, the Forerunner 305 is superior to the 405. The 305 at least allows you to follow a "breadcrumb" path on the screen. The 405 allows you to follow a course, but the lack of a breadcrumb screen sometimes makes navigation difficult. It will tell you to turn right or left at certain points, or point you in the direction you need to go, but if you go off course, well good luck getting back on course without at least the breadcrumb.

    I'm hoping the Edge 500 will at least have a breadcrumb screen. I really think that's all you need. It doesn't take long to map out a course using bikeroutetoaster.com or mapmyride.com and transfer it to the unit. Once you have that, you can follow the breadcrumb and safely make it back home. Which is a big deal for me because I've moved around a bit and frequently bike in unfamiliar areas. Having the Edge 705 would obviously be even better, but that obviously comes at a cost.

  22. #22
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    Seems to me that Garmin is trying to expand their market. The more a unit does, the more it costs and the more diverse are the groups clammering for their specific feature to be added. They want to sell both a 60csx AND an Edge 500 to the data freaks. Not a single Edge 705. Notice their newest GPS models: A dog tracker for hunters and a golf-specific model with built-in courses. They want to have as little functional overlap as the market will bear. Doubt we'll see a trend towards feature consolidation until / unless they start feeling heat from a competitor.

  23. #23
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    That dog tracker Astro receiver has been out for years. All of the touch screen handhelds are newer. They have quite a bit of feature integration, actually. I think even all of the Edge receivers are even newer than the Astro. The golf one is pretty new, though. It is clever, though. I can see how it would be useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eisidor
    Hey, I just wanted to follow up on this, being that I've owned both the Forerunner 405 and Forerunner 305. For navigation, the Forerunner 305 is superior to the 405. The 305 at least allows you to follow a "breadcrumb" path on the screen. The 405 allows you to follow a course, but the lack of a breadcrumb screen sometimes makes navigation difficult. It will tell you to turn right or left at certain points, or point you in the direction you need to go, but if you go off course, well good luck getting back on course without at least the breadcrumb.
    Thank you very much!

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    That dog tracker Astro receiver has been out for years. All of the touch screen handhelds are newer. They have quite a bit of feature integration, actually. I think even all of the Edge receivers are even newer than the Astro. The golf one is pretty new, though. It is clever, though. I can see how it would be useful.
    Yeah, good point, I did let the hyperbole get the better of me... but I still think that Garmin is tending to specialize rather than generalize their products.

  26. #26
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    I dunno...look at the Colorado, Oregon, and Dakota receivers. Lots of options to also use a HRM or Cadence sensor on those. For the situation where 'if you can only have one'. Sure they've come out with some niche market receivers, but the new handhelds are very generalized.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    I dunno...look at the Colorado, Oregon, and Dakota receivers. Lots of options to also use a HRM or Cadence sensor on those. For the situation where 'if you can only have one'. Sure they've come out with some niche market receivers, but the new handhelds are very generalized.
    SO, "If you can only have one" and you want as much "Bang for the buck" as possible, Which one would you get?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM
    SO, "If you can only have one" and you want as much "Bang for the buck" as possible, Which one would you get?
    Tough to answer that without knowing what "bang for the buck" means to you.

    For me the 705 offers HRM, cadence, tracks to add to my computer collection and share with friends, fitness tracking, mapping and navigational abilities that I could use in the truck as well, if I wanted/needed. I can use it on the road bike, and hiking. None of the other new GPSers offer anything better for my needs.
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  29. #29
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    depends on your activities...

    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM
    SO, "If you can only have one" and you want as much "Bang for the buck" as possible, Which one would you get?
    ...i feel that if BIKING is your Main outdoor activity, as it is mine, the Edge 705 is the Way to Go. It has a Small-ish footprint too, which helps with Biking devices.
    I Have had mine for 18 months and am very Satisfied.
    The Higher-End Rino 530hcx is great too if you Hike and want a Radio option, it is also Happens to be a great Color Screen GPS unit as well. I also use it for Biking when i do Club Rides as we use radios to stay in touch, we ride quite a bit at night.

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    Two votes for the 705. I don't think my "Bang for the buck" parameters would be any different from most. I usually feel it's best to have a few features I may not use, then to find out later after you get to know the device that yours won't do that.

  31. #31
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    Depends on your primary activities. For biking, I've found that I value small size a great deal, but then again biking is one of my major activities. For hiking, I like a larger GPS, so something different might be in order. For paddling, I like a GPS that floats for recovery just in case.

    Depending on what you want to do most will determine what GPS to get.

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    Biking mostly.

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    Then you hafta decide what features are most important and what is less important.

    Factor in price, too.

    For me, ability to add a basemap is essential, so that right away sends me to the Edge 605 or 705. I then decided I'd like HR, which narrowed it further to the 705. Then I decided I wanted speed/cad for riding the trainer so that put me at the 705 HR+Cad.

    If you don't want a basemap so much, but do want courses, then the Edge 205/305 would be the choice. If you don't need a basemap/courses but want tracking and the accessories, look into the 500.

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    From what little bit I know now (Or, think I know) I thinkin 705 for me. Just waitin to see if there's a 805 etc. around the corner.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM
    From what little bit I know now (Or, think I know) I thinkin 705 for me. Just waitin to see if there's a 805 etc. around the corner.
    There's always something new around the corner. If you wait for the next thing, you'll always be waiting. What new potential features would you possibly want that much?

    Keep in mind that the "first adopter syndrome" is real. New products always have bugs that need to be worked out and new adopters get to suffer through the headaches. The Edge receivers have been out awhile and most of those issues have been addressed. Or, if you wait for the newer model, you can hope for a price drop. Sometimes that happens, but not always.

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    Good points NateHawk. IIRC, The 705 doesn't have outside temp. I'd like that feature. But it's by no means a deal breaker. The possibility of a price drop is nice though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAVAGESAM
    Good points NateHawk. IIRC, The 705 doesn't have outside temp. I'd like that feature. But it's by no means a deal breaker. The possibility of a price drop is nice though.
    Good luck getting outside temp on any device. I have a watch that reports it, but the heat from my wrist throws it WAY off. I gotta take it off and set it in the shade for half an hour to get it to report somewhat correctly.

    You're better off just getting a separate thermometer to put on your pack strap, jersey zipper, or whatever. It'll cost you a few bucks. Skiers use them.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    There's always something new around the corner. If you wait for the next thing, you'll always be waiting. What new potential features would you possibly want that much?.
    A PLB would be nice.

  39. #39
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    I will be doing a review for MTBR.com shortly on the Edge 500, for me it does exactly what I want, lots of information (except I don't need the power meter stuff), I never used any of the options of the Edge 305 that the Edge 500 is missing, and I never really use the map on my Delorme Earthmate PN-40, so for me Simple is as Simple Does

  40. #40
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    the golf gps cannot be a do-all unit, i.e., have altitude capability etc. (yes, even if turned off). otherwise it will be non-conforming per usga rules and handicapping, and would not sell and this is a very competitive market with too many products already

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    Will it do the same functions with heart rate as the Forerunner 305? What is important for me is programable high and low alarms. The Garmin website is not clear on it and they don't have the manual available to download yet.
    OB1 Kielbasa

    One is good!

  42. #42
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    Long live the 305! Long live Motionbased.com

    Everything else is fluff.

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    What about all the options for the 705?

    Are the data card and street maps good to have?

    What's in the Topo bundle?

    Anybody know what's in the Team Garmin bundle?

    To keep the thread somewhat on topic. Does anyone know how the "Courses" function (competing against a previous workouts) works? I know you could compare them after you download but does this actually compare a route as you're actually riding it?

    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by goneskiian
    What about all the options for the 705?
    What about them?
    Are the data card and street maps good to have?
    I have a car GPS and my handheld is already registered with my city nav maps. So I don't need them for the Edge 705. Besides, I only got that one for biking, and I don't really ride road. At any rate, the street maps really only give you POI data (restaurants, hotels, gas, etc, which can be pretty outdated in the contact info department if you want a hotel room) and autorouting, which is optimized for driving a car, not riding a bike. So the autorouting feature would tend to send you to major highways instead of quiet backroads. If you plan on using the GPS in the car, the street maps might be useful. Otherwise, the topos will show streets, too, and not be so car-centric.

    You will need the data card if you want to load maps or load lots of trail data. The Edge's onboard memory isn't too significant, and is mostly for the limited amount of data it can save. Put data onto the memory card to keep this space open in case you need it.

    What's in the Topo bundle?

    Anybody know what's in the Team Garmin bundle?
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?...885#versionTab
    http://www.rei.com/search?cat=8000&cat=4500105&jxBrand=Garmin&hist=ca t,4500105:Bike+Computers^jxBrand,Garmin
    Team bundle is the same as Deluxe bundle, except the receiver is orange.
    IMO, those bundles really aren't worth much, considering that 24k topos can be had for free from gpsfiledepot.com. I think the biggest bundle that's worthwhile is the HR+Cad bundle, but of course only if you need/want that. If you don't want those, then just get the 605 (it's easier to find). If you want one (HR or Cad), you still need the 705.

    To keep the thread somewhat on topic. Does anyone know how the "Courses" function (competing against a previous workouts) works? I know you could compare them after you download but does this actually compare a route as you're actually riding it?

    Thanks!
    AFAIK, courses allow you to virtually compete with another rider, with a previous ride you've done, or whatever and it actually compares as you ride.

  45. #45
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    Thanks Nate.

    Perhaps I should have prefaced my post with the fact that I'm a total newb to GPS (don't have one in the car and have never really "used" one though I look forward to learning and love maps). I am not a newb to bike riding though. ;-)

    I am mainly shopping for an ANT+ compatible computer as I ride and race on the road mostly and will likely be getting either a Quarq Cinco or a metrigear vector power meter setup for my road bike. However, I am planning to do some mtb racing and hopefully some backcountry touring hence my interest in the 705 and 500.

    Anyway, thanks for you input about the 705 option packages. I'll definitely get the HR and cadence I'm just a bit fuzzy on what's available after market.

    So, let me get this straight. If I can get topographic maps for the 705 online at gpsfiledepot.com should I just get the basic 705 (with cadence/speed if I'm so inclined) and then buying a microSD card to load maps onto separately?

    Thanks,
    -Ian

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneskiian
    So, let me get this straight. If I can get topographic maps for the 705 online at gpsfiledepot.com should I just get the basic 705 (with cadence/speed if I'm so inclined) and then buying a microSD card to load maps onto separately?

    Thanks,
    -Ian
    That's what I've done...except I haven't bought the memory card yet.

  47. #47
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    anyone have an official release date on this?? I need to snap one up.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by nocondorfx
    anyone have an official release date on this?? I need to snap one up.
    http://www.runnersroost.com/store/storeproduct910.aspx

    Took me less than a minute to find.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by pastajet
    I will be doing a review for MTBR.com shortly on the Edge 500, for me it does exactly what I want, lots of information (except I don't need the power meter stuff), I never used any of the options of the Edge 305 that the Edge 500 is missing, and I never really use the map on my Delorme Earthmate PN-40, so for me Simple is as Simple Does
    I completely agree. I have had my 305 for almost 3 years now. I never use any of the "extras." I only use the immediate feedback for the speed, cadence, HR, time, elevation gain, etc. during a ride. I do upload the information to GTC and Connect to see the map and stats post ride though.

    For the last couple months I haven't been using my 305, because it has a tendency to turn off mid ride. This seems to be common in the group of guys I ride with, road or MTB. I'd like to replace it with something, but don't want to spend a fortune on a 705, unless I got a power meter. Now though, the 500 seems like a better alternative for users like me.

    Can someone clarify... if I were to upload information from the 500 to GTC or Connect, would it plot the GPS track points from the ride and map it for me?

  50. #50
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    Yes it will, it is a GPS.

    Look at "Analyze Your Ride" on the Garmin Edge 500 info page here, you will need to scroll down.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  51. #51
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    For the last couple months I haven't been using my 305, because it has a tendency to turn off mid ride.
    I had that too w/edge 305 often. i think when it looses the signal it turns itself off. in the spring i do the same work-out every week, training for a triathlon and I have problems there wih the edge 305 and the foreunner 405.

    the place is near a mountain range between several towns. luckily i found some mtbing right were my devices were loosing the signal. today I ran there at lunch time

    http://connect.garmin.com/activity/19263855

    i use the 405 for mtb, road and running. The edge on one road bike, as the replacement clamp on the other road bike was shoddy and busted

    i dropped the edge and the cadence only works/records w/one road bike, the one that the clamp busted

    anyway, the edge hasn't turned off like the problem you been having since used it in the spring at the problem spots. the edge 305 elevation gain is more accurate then the 405
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkerpeter
    For the last couple months I haven't been using my 305, because it has a tendency to turn off mid ride.
    That is a known issue with the battery contacts.
    305 garmin: spontaneous shut-off :(

    Garmin has been fixing or exchanging, even it the unit is out of warranty. You just have to contact them, they are very generous at taking care of customer is you just contact them.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  53. #53
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nocondorfx
    anyone have an official release date on this?? I need to snap one up.


    http://www.runnersroost.com/store/storeproduct910.aspx

    Took me less than a minute to find.
    how's it on a runners web site but it clearly says
    lightweight GPS-based cycling computer for performance-driven cyclists.


    they're showing 3 data fields, w/the bigest one being power

    i don't work in power but i think you need like a sram crank or something, i think i would want one, but they (garmin) need to solidy the web based service before i pony up and buy more of there crap
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkmacman
    how's it on a runners web site but it clearly says




    they're showing 3 data fields, w/the bigest one being power

    i don't work in power but i think you need like a sram crank or something, i think i would want one, but they (garmin) need to solidy the web based service before i pony up and buy more of there crap
    Garmin is a hardware company, clearly not so good with the software. But who says you have to rely on Garmin to provide software solutions? The GPS simply collects data. You can take your data wherever you want, including MS Excel, to get what you're looking for.

    There are literally dozens of websites out there that allow you to upload data from your Garmin GPS (directly...not even through some goofy roundabout method) and do various things with it. Some sites are good for sharing. Others are good for fitness. Others are pretty basic, allowing simple visualization.

    Seriously why you're basing your assessment of this GPS off of some other website is beyond me. If you go directly to Garmin's site (their site is good for comparing products), you will see several screen shots of this GPS, demonstrating that you can choose to organize the display how you like.



    Furthermore, power does not require a special crank. There are a couple ways to do it. One is through the hub. There is also a new device (discussed on this site) that fits into the hollow spindle of a speedplay pedal to get power measurements. That one is new, so you can probably expect them to support other pedals in the future.

    If you don't want to buy Garmin stuff, that's fine. But good luck with finding fitness GPS receivers comparable to the Edge 305 or to the Forerunner 405.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkmacman
    I had that too w/edge 305 often. i think when it looses the signal it turns itself off. in the spring i do the same work-out every week, training for a triathlon and I have problems there wih the edge 305 and the foreunner 405.
    I think this is a different problem than I have been having. My 305 turning off seems to be related to vibration. I am able to turn it back on right away and it still knows where the satellites are, but the avg. speed, time, and distance calculations are messed up. Also, this happens fairly frequently and I don't like to worry about turning on the device time and time again.

    My other option is to have Garmin refurbish the device... assuming they do that. I just don't know what they would charge, chances are they don't either until they get it and see what the problem is.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    That is a known issue with the battery contacts.
    305 garmin: spontaneous shut-off :(

    Garmin has been fixing or exchanging, even it the unit is out of warranty. You just have to contact them, they are very generous at taking care of customer is you just contact them.
    I think you just made my day! I need my 305 for training and I don't think I have been pushing as hard since I don't have my HR data on hand. I'll check out the other thread and get in touch with Garmin.

    Thanks again!

  57. #57
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    Never had that problem in the 3-4 years I have owned it, and I brutal trails that vibrate anything loose. Now on occasion the Edge 305 will decide not to start, so I have to go back and plug it into the wall and let it juice up for a day, that is very annoying! But I use 2 GPS units so its not a problem.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkmacman
    they're showing 3 data fields, w/the bigest one being power

    i don't work in power but i think you need like a sram crank or something, i think i would want one, but they (garmin) need to solidy the web based service before i pony up and buy more of there crap
    All the Edge units have customizable screens, how many fields to show, what is in each field. The least is two and the max is eight on the 305 and 705 that I own. I suspect this is the same basic display software in the 500.

    There are many other choice for software to download your data, and not just the Garmin online ones. TopoFusion is excellent, and the author does epic rides, hangs out here when he is not on the bike lost beyond the horizon. SportTracks is great for tracking fitness. Look at Trimble Outdoors, CrankFire shows tremendous promise coming to reality. Nate has a long thread with many suggestions about websites for sharing GPS data.

    Get to know your GPS and don't be so stubborn about sending that fax to get yours fixed. You might like Garmin better if you gave them a fair chance and put as much energy into getting the most from yours as you do bashing Garmin.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkmacman
    i don't work in power but i think you need like a sram crank or something, i think i would want one, but they (garmin) need to solidy the web based service before i pony up and buy more of there crap
    I know this isn't the place to get into power too much but to clarify what will work with these Garmin units...

    In a nutshell... anything that transmits using the ANT+ protocol.

    A quick list...

    The original and still very good SRM.

    The ever popular hub based system the Cyclops Powertap.

    The new comer to the crank based game Quarq CinQo.

    The so-new-it's-not-yet-available pedal based system the Metrigear Vector.

    I believe Ergomo, a bottom bracket based system, is still alive and kicking but I can't seem to find anything current on them.

    Cheers!
    -Ian

    Oh yeah, thanks for all your help on GPS stuff!

  60. #60
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    Get to know your GPS and don't be so stubborn about sending that fax to get yours fixed. You might like Garmin better if you gave them a fair chance and put as much energy into getting the most from yours as you do bashing Garmin
    The edge 305 is near obsolete, so at this point, I'll just leave it be.

    I am aware of the pedals that log power, and although I currently don't work in it, I may possibly in the future. However, since I am a triathlete, I 'm more likely to purchase a device that you can swim and run with, especially since the edge 305 and foreunner 405 cannot
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkmacman
    The edge 305 is near obsolete, so at this point, I'll just leave it be.

    I am aware of the pedals that log power, and although I currently don't work in it, I may possibly in the future. However, since I am a triathlete, I 'm more likely to purchase a device that you can swim and run with, especially since the edge 305 and foreunner 405 cannot
    I am not sure I would agree with the 305 being obsolete, there are evidently hundreds ot thousands or maybe millions of users out there uploading data to so many online sites. Many folks do incredible rides on old bikes, why not use an old GPS? Due to my cardiac problems, I would not have a 705 except that the shop owner where I work wanted me to have one to show customers; otherwise, my cardiologist and I would be happy with the data from the 305.

    I do see your needs as a triathlete being different, and that is a very valid point that I had not realized before. Is there a GPS with HRM that works swimming? Seems like a tough environment to track GPS signal and transmit HRM data from a chest strap underwater to a flailing arm!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  62. #62
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    Is there a GPS with HRM that works swimming?
    most of the garmin foreunners work in water just not the 405. in the pool i sometimes use the cheap polar f4 (40 bux)

    terry laughlin the head of total immersion is an advocate of open water swimming claims he don't use a hrm/gps


    this came out shortly after the forerunner 405, that's why i don't trust garmin
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  63. #63
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    Kinda silly not to "trust" Garmin after they release a fitness watch to cater to the tri crowd. After all, they did address people's concerns and came out with one.

    Look into the Swimovate if you're pissed at Garmin.

  64. #64
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    Played around with the 500 a bit at my LBS. Way chubbier than I thought it would be. I expected it to be thin and sleek. Pretty fat.

    Anyone else with hands on experience yet? Thoughts?

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    I don't have "hands on" experience but have been studying the specifications of the various computers. Size wise, the Edge 500 is slightly wider than the Edge 205/305 but significantly shorter. Its total physical size is 80% of the area of the Edge 205/305 yet has the same size of display. The size of the Edge 500 would seem to be a positive in comparison to other members of its family.

    Compared to the Mavic Wintech (not a GPS) which has a very narrow appearance, the Edge 500 is much wider but is also relatively shorter. The Cateye Strada family (also not a GPS) is both shorter and narrower than the Edge 500.

    If size is an issue, consider the Garmin Forerunner series - the 310xt, 305 or 405. The Suunto 3tc and the 6tc could also be considered as they are gps watches that have cycling specific accessories. The Forerunners and Suunto models offer flexibility for use in other activities in addition to cycling.

    If a GPS is not required but flexibility of use is desired, consider the Garmin Forerunner 60. It is a fitness watch that has heart rate. Accessories allow it to record speed, distance and cadence as well as (running) pace. It can be mounted on the bike and like the Forerunner 405 can download data quickly to the computer through use of an ANT stick.

    The Garmin FR60 is about the size of the Cateye Strada V2C. The display on the FR 60 is about half the size of the screen on the Edge 500.

  66. #66
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    http://dcrainmaker.blogspot.com/2009/11/garmin-edge-500-in-depth-review.html

    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

  67. #67
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    Excellent review! Now if Garmin would just send me my media review sample! Jake, are you out there?

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