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  1. #1
    GEAUX TIGERS!!!
    Reputation: RighteousTrail's Avatar
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    Need advice on my first GPS unit, please

    I am a bit overwhelmed by reading some of your posts on here but my basic question is, "what is a good unit to get that attaches to your mtn bike and is good in all types of terrain?'
    I want to start out "all In" and start mapping my rides everytime I ride. One that gives out elevation and mileage with ways to submit waypoints. What is the price range for a unit with this capability?
    Thanks for the info.

  2. #2
    GEAUX TIGERS!!!
    Reputation: RighteousTrail's Avatar
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    Anybody........
    Just throw out a unit that you are pleased with. Especially one that you use in the most difficult terrain. Thanks

  3. #3
    NEPMCPMBA President
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    I use a garmin GPSMap 60CSx.

    It's overkill for a mountain bike, and quite bulky, but still easy to use and not very heavy. I crash a lot and the worst thing that ever happened was the unit shut off. It's never shut off from just bumps or drops. You can get cheaper versions of it that don't have the barometric altimeter or electronic compass, both of which I don't use.

  4. #4
    GEAUX TIGERS!!!
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    Thanks for the response.

  5. #5
    Homey the Clown
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    Unless a bunch of your riding is in unknown areas, and you need to map out new trails the Edge 205/305 is a fine unit. You can even use it for mapping if you pair it with DeLorme's Topo 7. If you want a unit that shows a real map on the screen the DeLorme PN-20 is a great unit. It is the most reasonable way to get a good GPSr with maps (and the best maps, atmo). You can also download satellite and/or aerial imagery to put on the GPS, something you can't do with any other GPSr.

  6. #6
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    I have a GPS60cx. It's a great unit but like the other guy said more than you need for mtb'ing, plus it's kinda big to mount to the bars. I carry mine in my pack when I use it so that's kinda a pain. The Etrex series are better suited to be mounted on a bike. They are not as user friendly in that they don't have many dedicated function buttons. this means you have to navigate much more thru menus. But, b/c of this it is smaller and units like Vista have everything you need to map out your rides, and more.

    Between these two types which I've owned/own both I'd definately go with the 60 if you plan on every using it in your car with City Nav. It supports turn by turn directions, the Etrex series does not. Also if you plan on hiking or geocaching with a gps the 60 is better suited with a bigger screen, more direct buttons, electronic compass(this means you don't have to walk a few yards in a straight line to find your bearing) and fantastic reception (i get 8 or 9 satellites sitting in my living room). For strictly biking I prefer the smaller Etrex Vista.

    One caveat: Whatever (Garmin) you buy get one with the SIRF3 Chipset. This is crucial for superior reception. My 60csx never has problems with reception in the trees up north or in canyons. My old Etrex Legend (without SIRF3) would often lose it's lock. They may all be SIRF3 by now, I don't know.

  7. #7
    Masher
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    SiRFIII used to be the standard, now there are several GPS chipsets that perform better, including the u-blox5 and STMicro's Teseo chipset (chosen by Garmin for many of their new PND and Nuvi platforms). But the SiRFIII is still pretty good.

  8. #8
    I don't huck.
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    The garmin 205/305 seem to be the holy grail for collecting on-bike ride info and stuffing that into a mapping program. that said, I have just been using my Magellan eXplorist 400 that was purchased for geocaching and general purpose GPS use and together with Topofusion, have been creating excellent profiles of my rides, although I do not have all the speed over distance stuff the Garmins provide.

    I also made my own stem mount for it as the Magellan stuff was pretty lame.

    If I was just buying it primarily for bike use and software interface to maps, etc, I would buy a Garmin Edge 205. But, run what ya brung and the Magellan is doing fine and has over the year, proved to be a fine, accurate and rugged GPS.
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  9. #9
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    I use the Delorme PN-20 and love it so far. I haven't been able to use it in the states yet, but it does have worldwide base maps in the unit. Right now Delorme is rebating the unit with a sd card reader and TOPO 7.0 to $299, check their website.

  10. #10
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    I use the Garmin Vista HCx when I ride, it is small and does not get in the way. It has mapping capabilities, plus provides elevation and an electronic compass. With a 2 GB micro SD card (the largest you can use with this model) you can load a variety of street and topo maps in addition to leaving room for saving your rides in the mass USB drive. That being said, you have to purchase the street and topo maps seperately, which can cost nearly as much as the GPS. I picked mine up for just over $200.00 during a sale at REI and it seems to suit all my needs. Now if you are looking for a cycling computer that will give you maps, elevation, cadence, and heart rate then you might want to look at the new Garmin Edge 705 but it is more the double the price of the Vista HCX.

  11. #11
    Full of holes
    Reputation: SwissBuster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hagen
    I want to start mapping my rides everytime I ride. One that gives out elevation and mileage with ways to submit waypoints.
    If by mapping you mean making a record of where you went, pretty much all GPSs on the market will do this, plus elevation and mileage records and waypoints. There is an electronic 'bread crumb' map of where you have been which you can download to a PC and use to 'map' your routes. If by mapping you mean you want an onscreen (colour) map, you need to go upmarket.

    For what its worth, my forerunner 205 does not have a barometric altimeter but I have found that it is easily accurate enough to record altitude and elevation gain for biking (or skiing). I remember researching this to death before I bought my first GPS... turns out I didn't need one.

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