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  1. #1
    thread killer
    Reputation: WTF-IDK's Avatar
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    Feb 2009
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    729

    New question here. I need help getting the most out of my new toy.

    My wonderful wife got me a Garmin 60CSX GPS for my birthday a few weaks ago.
    I've been reading the manual (really boring stuff) and I've learned how to "track"
    My first ride. Now what?

    I've seen all this stuff that you guys post here on MTBR with the maps over a satellite picture.
    How do you do that? And do I need to buy another program to do it?

    Can I upload someone else's "track" to my gps? To say take a ride that I haven't been to before?

    The map that is on my 60CSX is very vague. It only shows the major highways in my area.
    That leaves me with no reference when I'm way out in the woods.
    Is there another map that I can load into my GPS that will help me in the woods?
    Again do I need to buy another program for that? Something like a topo or google earth?
    I know I can buy an updated road map from Garmin for some bucks but that won't help in the woods.

    I really want to get the most of the amazing little gizmo. Any help would be great.

    Thanks very much in advance.
    Bryan
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  2. #2
    crash test dummy
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    Aug 2004
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    I've seen all this stuff that you guys post here on MTBR with the maps over a satellite picture.
    How do you do that? And do I need to buy another program to do it?

    -- Look in the manual to learn how to save your track in Mapsource as a ".gpx" file. Then open that .gpx file in Google Earth. You can then save the google earth image as a jpeg.

    Can I upload someone else's "track" to my gps? To say take a ride that I haven't been to before?

    -- Yup. One of the principal benefits for mountain biking. First, do a Google search for the park you're riding in + "gps track" or something as a search term. Then upload that track to your GPS device (read the manual). When you're in the park, the track should show up near your location. Just follow the line. Incidentally, initially this is not exactly simple. Mapsource has a ton of options and works in a very specific way. You will need to study the manual and use trial and error to get it to do what you want.

    The map that is on my 60CSX is very vague. It only shows the major highways in my area.
    That leaves me with no reference when I'm way out in the woods.
    Is there another map that I can load into my GPS that will help me in the woods? Again do I need to buy another program for that? Something like a topo or google earth?
    I know I can buy an updated road map from Garmin for some bucks but that won't help in the woods.

    -- Yeah. Wow, you are really new at this. First, if you want more detailed info you will need a Topo map. These come on DVD or a memory card. You can buy just your region, just national parks (higher detail), or all of the US (called Topo USA). I'd recommend getting all of the US - it isn't much more $$$ than the regional maps. Maps are PRICEY - usually around $100 - and they don't come with updates.

    Next you upload the areas of the US you need to your device using Mapsource. The Topo USA maps also show streets, but won't plan an "autoroute" like a car gps. For that you need to buy the city navigator maps. Honestly though these devices suck for following street maps. It would be like chopping tomatoes with a chainsaw.

    The last thing I'll say is this - it isn't an iPhone. These devices are highly configurable, and as a result there are many ways to use them, which makes them complicated and user-unfriendly...at first. But once you set it up in a way that makes sense to you, and practice with it, they work like an extension of your brain. You can't just read the manual, you need to STUDY it. And practice, practice.

    I say this from experience. The first few weeks I found my Vista HCX confusing as heck, but then I read the manual through a few times, and dragged the device around with me for a while, playing with the data as I collected it. Eventually, it made sense, but it was work. Now, though, I'm never lost, which has been a huge time saver when exploring new terrain.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MaxAug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    35
    You can take a look at these links, maybe you will find it interesting:

    http://www.turbolince.com/en/downloa...navigator.html

    http://www.turbolince.com/en/mountai...tor_guide.html

    Bye!

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