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  1. #1
    Grip it and rip it.
    Reputation: Damitletsride!'s Avatar
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    Here is what i want in a gps

    [SIZE="4"]The main things i want for MTB use[/SIZE]

    1)HRM and time
    2)Total meters of climbing on a race or ride
    3)route profile
    4)There is an 80 mile point to point race every year i do at night and i have got lost a few times, i thought if i rode it at daytime with a gps, it would prevent me to get lost at night. Am i correct?

    [SIZE="4"]Road use[/SIZE]

    1) HRM is very important to me along with distance and time.
    2) Route profile and total meters of climbing, save routes to the unit for future rides.

    I would also like to be able to put routes into the gps by putting in ordance survey map coordinates, but i don't know if this is generally done or not.

    I hope to purchase in the next day or two!
    Thanks on any input
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

    michaelmblog.wordpress.com

  2. #2
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    Do not expect any GPS to give an accurate assessment of meters climbed, or a route profile. Many models will give you one, but there are too many variables in the measurement method. The only way to be truly accurate is to get out there with a ruler and a clinometer and physically measure it.

    Many Garmin models offer HRM functions. How much extra do you want?

    To enter coordinates manually, you probably don't want an Edge. They are more useful for recording a ride than planning a ride. Look into some of the newer mapping models that offer HRM accessories.

  3. #3
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    What newer models would you be talking about? Whatever one i get it will be my main HRM for the Lynda Wallenfells training plan aswell, so i will need to be able to set heart rate zones.
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  4. #4
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    Something like the Garmin Colorado. Garmin's website provides a good comparison between models. You may find you need a separate GPS and HRM. It's what I use, but I only use basic HRM functions. Still, the training GPS receivers are insufficient for my GPS use.

  5. #5
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    It says on the garmin website that the colorado is for marine use
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  6. #6
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    get an iphone and get the GPS app, trail guru

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by New to MB
    get an iphone and get the GPS app, trail guru
    No, the iphone is NOT made for mountain biking. You're just asking for a broken phone.

    Lots of Garmin GPSes are made for many uses, except the training models. I use a 76CSx on the bike. I made a mount to attach it to the stem and it works fine. Even though Garmin made it to be useful to boaters. I just also happen to take it canoeing (and hiking), so the fact that it floats is helpful. It's been thrashed in rapids, too.

    Toss an iphone in a whitewater river for half an hour and expect it to survive....I'd love to see that.

  8. #8
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    How could i mount it while riding? Is it durable? Does it have a HRM?
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  9. #9
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    Read the spec sheets, dude. Look at the accessory lists for the colorado and the oregon. Both are compatible with Garmins HRM, and the oregon is also compatible with the speed/cadence sensor.

    Figure the mount yourself. If you don't like what Garmin offers, look at RAM mounts or elsewhere...or worst case scenario, make one yourself. I made one for my 76 to mount on my stem. Works great. Bought a h-bar mount and used a hacksaw and some sandpaper to make it fit the stem, no big deal.

  10. #10
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    Garmin 705

    Garmin 705 does all that.

  11. #11
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    Hi guys, I think i have a solution for you. I found very interasting phone application: SportyPal. You can track, map your ride. It has a lot of features like measuring time, distance, position, average speed. The only thing you need is GPS on the phone. I'm using IPhone, but as I read on their web site it can be used on every cell phone with gps. It's free and after the ride with only one click i have the data on the internet www.sportypal.com/community , with all the statistics and the rout, they provide very good service. I think it's very usable, has anybody else tried this?

  12. #12
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    Here is a thought, gps's for cyclist come over from the hikers who pioneered their usage. Why would you not include a temperature sensor in them ?
    So my list for what I want is:
    -hrm
    -Accurate total incline measurement (via barometric sensor)
    -all normal cycling functions
    -auto start stop
    -switch to pace from mph/kph
    -easy upload to global map like google
    -various route mapping functions
    -but yes temperature viewable and measured as I ride. (Kinda like I used to be able to get from Polar with my old s720i).
    The Garmin Edge series is just a wonderful on or off road bike computer imho, but temperature function capablitites is a really huge failure....imho (I ride much differently at 100 degrees than I do at 40 degree on a mountain bike.)
    Do any of the garmin GPS's include a temp sensor ?
    Does anyone know of a mini digital themometer that I could hook on to my camelbak or bars ?
    Does Polar cs400 computer show temp while riding in the stats like the old ones used to ?

  13. #13
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    I just bought the 705. I think a temp sensor somehow would be really usefull like you said ghawk, still getting to grips with the edge though.
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  14. #14
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    GPSes (most, anyway) do have a temp sensor, especially the ones with a barometric altimeter. It's just not on the main display, it's buried. I've never needed one, either. My body works fine as a temp sensor, and it can markedly tell the difference between 100F and 40F. Believe it or not, it can even tell the difference in as little as 1F increments. Amazing!
    Being told by my GPS that the temp is 72F won't make any difference to me. I want to know what the temp is when starting a ride, and whether that temp is expected to increase, stay the same, or decrease so I can choose appropriate clothing. Real-time temp readings on the GPS waste display space for more useful info. Attaching a thermometer to your body won't give you accurate readings because your body heat will screw it up.

    Accurate route profiles are impossible due the way that's measured on a GPS. It can give you an estimate, but if you want an accurate measurement you have to get on your hands & knees and do it with a ruler and a compass.

    Uploads to various services are a software issue, not a hardware one. Personally, I prefer .shp files for my uploaded tracks and I have a program that does that. It's easy enough....not sure what would make it any easier.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghawk
    Here is a thought, gps's for cyclist come over from the hikers who pioneered their usage. Why would you not include a temperature sensor in them ?
    So my list for what I want is:
    -hrm
    -Accurate total incline measurement (via barometric sensor)
    -all normal cycling functions
    -auto start stop
    -switch to pace from mph/kph
    -easy upload to global map like google
    -various route mapping functions
    -but yes temperature viewable and measured as I ride. (Kinda like I used to be able to get from Polar with my old s720i).
    The Garmin Edge series is just a wonderful on or off road bike computer imho, but temperature function capablitites is a really huge failure....imho (I ride much differently at 100 degrees than I do at 40 degree on a mountain bike.)
    Do any of the garmin GPS's include a temp sensor ?
    Does anyone know of a mini digital themometer that I could hook on to my camelbak or bars ?
    Does Polar cs400 computer show temp while riding in the stats like the old ones used to ?

  15. #15
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    Honesty You Should Not Need Any Of It

    Being told by my GPS that the temp is 72F won't make any difference to me. I want to know what the temp is when starting a ride, and whether that temp is expected to increase, stay the same, or decrease so I can choose appropriate clothing. Real-time temp readings on the GPS waste display space for more useful info. Attaching a thermometer to your body won't give you accurate readings because your body heat will screw it up.
    Agreed, I can also generally tell the temp, but it is still very nice to have. Beleive it or not unless you are "special" there are times when you ride hard enough that your sensitity to external data is a bit messed up. Or at least most of us humans do. Then it is really nice to have that data. My polar s720i had one for years and myself like many other normal cyclist find it very helpful.
    Btw, I can also sense my speed, how far I have gone, where I am etc., but.....it is still nice to have all the stats data possible in the toys. That is why were are on this forum.
    Btw, here is a great site for general first starting to do gps feature compairsons
    http://www.gpscity.com/compare/frun3...hcx&etrexsumhc

  16. #16
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    What you FEEL (whether or not the exercise has altered your perceptions) will regulate how you ride and what you wear. 40 deg on a leisurely bike path ride is different than 40 deg on a hammerfest mtb ride in the woods. I check the weather before I go outside and am perfectly happy.

    Part of the problem like I mentioned before, is that temp sensors aren't great. The temp sensor on a GPS is used by the GPS to make compensations in the barometric altimeter. I have a weather center watch, and the temp sensor is useless because my body heat screws up the temp reading.

    But really, what does a temp reading on a gps do for me? Sure, a speed readout lets me know if I'm riding faster today than yesterday. Cadence and HR let me know how hard I'm working to go that fast. Temp tells me...how warm or cold it is. Big deal. Very minor data, not the "really huge failure" you say, ghawk. If I was bikepacking for a week or so, such data might increase in importance, especially if the temps hover near freezing or at the top edge of my comfort level. But for a day trip, the thermometer on my kitchen window is going to give me the same number +/- a couple degrees of what it will be at the TH, and checking the weather forecasts/maps will tell me whether that will change or not.

    If I live in the mountains, I know the temp will vary by a specified amount by altitude, still no need for a thermometer there. A barometric altimeter will tell me more about the weather than a thermometer. Again, maybe convenient, but not a "really huge failure".

  17. #17
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    If I live in the mountains, I know the temp will vary by a specified amount by altitude, still no need for a thermometer there. A barometric altimeter will tell me more about the weather than a thermometer.
    Yea, I have a home in the mountains, I kinda like having temp readings as well as b pressure. Even blood pressure (even though I can generally sense that also.)
    Again, out on the trail data is fun, but don't become dependent on it, of course sensing, feeling, awareness, etc., hopefully that is why you are there.
    Temperature as well as other enviromental info is much more important to me than mph (very terrain dependent) while mountain biking. Such as during over night, multi-day, back country distance riding on the CT.
    http://www.climbingdreams.net/ctr/
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    Last edited by ghawk; 06-04-2009 at 04:12 AM.

  18. #18
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    Again, a nice convenience to be available (if it worked better than a wristwatch system) but not a major failure.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghawk
    Yea, I have a home in the mountains, I kinda like having temp readings as well as b pressure. Even blood pressure (even though I can generally sense that also.)
    Again, out on the trail data is fun, but don't become dependent on it, of course sensing, feeling, awareness, etc., hopefully that is why you are there.
    Temperature as well as other enviromental info is much more important to me than mph (very terrain dependent) while mountain biking. Such as during over night, multi-day, back country distance riding on the CT.
    http://www.climbingdreams.net/ctr/
    Killing brains cells, no more.

  19. #19
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    Come on now. The more valuable a particular data-point is might be directly proportional to the amount of thead space wasted argued against it's importance.
    Temp is great to have and even us Luddites like it such as in the polar cs400 that is pretty accurate when not in the sun (like any temp sensor.) Which Gps units have it buried Etrex, etc ? Yes, we all have built in temp sensors guys.....
    Ideally here is what I "want" in a gps: xm weather radar. Such as the Bushnell ONIX 400 Handheld GPS Weathertracker......but that actually works.
    But, ya know, in the back country, look up once in a while…..
    Last edited by glovemtb; 06-06-2009 at 04:44 AM.

  20. #20
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    I don't know which units have a built-in temp sensor as it's not an advertised 'feature'. It's there to help with the barometric altimeter, which needs a temp sensor to function correctly. It's accessed by going into the firmware...not a typical use of the GPS by any means.

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