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  1. #1
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    New question here. General HRM Question

    I'm seriously considering getting a HRM. I work with a lot of wannabe ironmen that swear by them. I personally don't see how a HRM will dramatically affect my workouts. I'm aware that I have "lazy" rides/runs/workouts that I could be putting forth more of an effort. I also have rides/runs/workouts that I have set a goal (like beating my best time from point a to point b) and I would rather pass out from exhaustion than fall short of my goal. In either case, I don't see myself looking at a HRM and thinking that I should pick up the pace or calm down. However, I am a gadget geek so I will more than likely get a HRM in the near future. My question for HRM users is: For the average person, can a HRM be an effective training tool or will it likely end up in the top of a desk drawer among the hundreds of other gadgets that never gets used?
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  2. #2
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    Sure it can. At minimum, you can use it to find out whether you've broken into an anaerobic workout or not. I have one I admittedly didn't use much until I got cancer. Now, my treatments really accelerate my HR, so I have to be very careful not to overdo it. So, I use my HRM to make sure I stay below a set HR, to ensure my workouts aren't too much. When I stop taking the chemo drugs, I will be able to increase my limit, but I will say that staying in the aerobic zone does better at building cardio fitness, while anaerobic workouts build strength, push your lactic acid threshold, and things like that.

    So for me, I will be staying aerobic for a good, long time. Having a HRM helps me make sure I stay there. Without a HRM, I'd have no clue.

    For the average guy, it's the same story, minus the chemo. To build cardio, stay aerobic for as long as you can. Keep doing it longer and longer. To build your anaerobic strengths, do intervals where you push yourself into the anaerobic zone. Do it longer and longer each time. It helps you build a structure into your workouts so you have a goal each time (even if it's not a huge one, but you plan on riding aerobic for so long before you switch to anaerobic to really push yourself for so long). Before you know it, you're building your fitness beyond what you thought you could do. Sure you can build fitness without one, but in using one you can concentrate your efforts and do better.

  3. #3
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    Nate, good luck on overcoming your cancer. I was diagnosed with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma back in mid-'05. I underwent chemo for the rest of '05 and the early part of '06. I've been cancer free every since. I wasn't very active during my chemo so hopefully your recovery will be even better than mine was. I've been commuting to/from work and riding my bike pretty much everywhere I go for a little over a year now and my Oncologist is amazed at how much my health has improved. I don't know exactly what kind of cancer you have, but I know that I was terrified when I first got my diagnosis. I remember wishing that I could talk to someone that had gone through something similar but unfortunately I never did. If you ever want to reach out to someone that has been in somewhat a similar situation, feel free to PM me. I'm more than willing to share my experiences with you.

    Thanks for your input about the HRM. I've gotten a pretty basic HRM and have played around with it a little so far. I'm going to start out using it during my morning commutes and when I run so that I can compare the data I collect to my other morning commutes and runs.
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