Results 1 to 84 of 84
  1. #1
    Trail Cubist
    Reputation: SWriverstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,135

    Garmin Oregon 450 vs. Edge 800

    Garmin has really grabbed the cycling GPS market with its Edge series of GPS units. Like all Garmin hardware, these are great units...and they almost seem to have become the "must-have" for cyclists.

    But I'm a big fan of the Garmin Oregon series, and I believe the Oregons represent a better value overall.

    I've always been an out-of-the-box thinker...and I don't believe that just because I'm a cyclist, I have to get a cycling-specific GPS. Though the Edge units have features the Oregon units lack, I believe to a certain extent, Garmin is just capitalizing on people's belief that if you make a product targeted at a specific audience and put a premium on it, people will buy it---which in the case of the Edge units is largely true.

    Here's my quick take on two comparable units, looking at the features that really matter: the Oregon 450 and the Edge 800.

    Here's the Oregon 450:



    Here's the Edge 800:




    TRAINING FEATURES
    If you're seriously into training, and you need/want training-specific features like a pace rider, work/rest intervals, pace alerts, in addition to heartrate and cadence...then stop right here and go get an Edge 800. The Oregon 450 has none of these features.

    On the other hand, the Oregon 450 does connect to heartrate and cadence sensors via bluetooth and displays this data. So if you all you need for training are these two metrics, you're good to go with the Oregon.

    SIZE & WEIGHT
    The Edge 800 (2" x 3.7" x 1") is smaller and slimmer than the Oregon (2.3" x 4.5" x 1.4")...as well as about half the weight (Edge = 3.5oz, Oregon = 6.8oz). So if you're the kind of biker obsessed with shaving every milligram off your gear, then you'll like the Edge. (Most of us aren't that obsessive.) The Oregon is by no means a "hulking box" on your bars---it's also small enough to easily fit in the palm of your hand...so we're kinda splitting hairs here. (And the Oregon has an excellent mounting plate.)

    DISPLAY SIZE
    This is where the Oregon wins hands-down. The Oregon has a larger display size (1.53"W x 2.55"H, 240x400px) than the Edge (1.4"W x 2.2"H, 160x240px). On devices this small to start with, the Oregon's larger display makes a BIG difference. Everything is easier on the larger display---buttons are bigger, scrolling maps is easier. Both devices are touchscreen, so that's a wash. And importantly, the Oregon's higher resolution display means tiny details on the screen are easier to see and read.

    MEMORY
    Again, the Oregon wins here, with 850MB internal (read: faster) memory, where the Edge 800 has a mere 105MB of internal memory. Both units accept Micro-SD cards, so that mitigates the Oregon's advantage to an extent...but internal memory is always faster regardless, and the Oregon has the "edge" here.

    The Oregon has a far greater capacity for waypoints, with a max of 2,000. The Edge allows 200 (no, that's not a typo---only 200).

    And the Oregon can store a far greater number of routes in internal memory.

    BATTERY
    The Oregon wins here in my opinion, simply because it uses easily-replaceable AA batteries. The Edge has a rechargeable. non-replaceable internal Li-Ion battery. The Edge's battery life is rated at 15hrs...and the Oregon's at 18hrs (and I've gotten well over 20hrs with the high-end Li-Ion AA's).

    MAPS
    This category is basically a tie, with both units having identical features...except I give the nod to the Oregon simply because of its larger display size---all maps are a LOT nicer to use and view on the larger display, period. Both have basemaps loaded (which are really useless because they lack detail), both allow you to load more detailed Garmin maps...and both support Garmin's custom maps.

    OTHER FEATURES
    This is a wash. The Edge 800 records temperature, which is pretty nice (but obviously not necessary)...and the Oregon 450 has sunrise/sunset times, tide charts, moon phases, etc (obviously not necessary). Both units have barometric altimeters.

    AND THE BOTTOM LINE: PRICE
    This is where I think the Oregon shines. Checking Amazon.com prices, the Oregon goes for $330...and the Edge goes for $449. So you're basically paying $120 more for the Edge to get a few extra training features and a slightly smaller package.

    It's important to note that neither unit comes with heartrate or cadence monitors---you've got to fork out for those separately. They're around $35 each, so adding the cost of these and you're looking at $400 for the Oregon and (ouch) $520 for the Edge.

    So as I said above, if you really need or want the training-specific features of the Edge 800, then you've gotta go with the Edge. Otherwise, if you're fine with just heartrate and cadence monitoring, the Oregon 450 is a far better value.

    The Oregon 450 has longer battery life, a bigger display, more internal memory, and more waypoints...and otherwise offers 100% of the features found in the Edge 800 (except training-specific features).

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Someone just posted a question to my website about the Oregon that prompted me to investigate the answer. Dude asked if the Oregon will display climbing gradient like his Edge 705.

    This would be another feature lacking on the Oregon. There are many options for displaying elevation information either in the trip computer or the elevation profile screens, but none of them will tell you the % gradient.

  3. #3
    Trail Cubist
    Reputation: SWriverstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,135
    Hmm...climbing gradient % is pretty cool. Then again, I'm not sure I'd want to know climbing gradient while I'm riding! LOL (And I can find out after the fact no problem with my tracklogs...)

    Obviously, both units are for different target markets. While the Oregon doesn't display climbing gradient, it does display vertical speed in feet per minute and glide slope---very useful if you're a hang glider or paraglider pilot! :-D

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  4. #4
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,817
    Well, I am skeptical of the touch screens while riding, at least for me. I need to watch heart rate, so I have it displayed to see when I am pushing close to maximum on the Bike Computer 1 & 2 screens plus the Map screen. I also have Grade on the Map screen and have disabled the Altitude screen so I can toggle back and forth with a single button push; altitude and ascent climbed gets analyzed at home on the computer.

    Being a trail designer / builder, I like to see Grade at times to understand how a trail rides (and on the road when it seems my exertion is higher than my eyes tell me it should be), so I will bump the Mode button with my left thumb or knuckles to get there and back, whether on road bike or mtn bike. I can toggle Bike Computer 1 & 2 screens with the zoom buttons by bumping with thumb or knuckles on my right hand. These bumps are easy to accomplish, even in fairly rough terrain.

    I also have way points set for tool stashes around my area that come in handy when you have so many and may not use them for a year or more. Bumping to the map screen as I ride along knowing there are tools close can be handy as well.

    I am not sure I could toggle screens with a touch screen unit as easily, so that is why I am skeptical.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    it would take a couple extra taps with the touch screen.

    you'd tap to activate the screen, tap to close what you're on, then at minimum tap again to open up what you need. at worst, you'd have to tap to scroll a couple times to get to the option you need. You can swipe your finger on the Oregon, but that doesn't work quite as well as other touch interfaces I've used. it likes to register swipes as taps occasionally if you do that.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,219
    I've been flirting with the idea of a gps, so here's a noob question. With the edge you can swap it between bikes, this means I can track separate routes and like a regular computer keep track of separate mileage (e.g. a road bike, mountain bike, and a third application like a navigator in the car)? Can the oregon 450 do this?

  7. #7
    3D guy
    Reputation: gstahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    329
    Dude,

    Your information is interesting but you are not really offering a useful unbiased comparison or even trying to. It is pretty clear you prefer the Oregon and want folks to know why. Good deal, glad the oregon works great for you. I think you miss the point about the Garmin product design...

    - Edge: smaller with cycling specific features, used for riding and racing.
    - Oregon: larger more versatile unit. but lacks some cycing specifc features.

    You absolute best point is that Garmin is too unit specific with their software.

    Why not bring out just a few package sizes (some color some not) and allow the user to say... today act like a cycling computer, tomorrow I am going for hike. Even if garmin did this expertly the Oregon and Edge would be two different units one smaller lighter weight for the handle bars mostly and one larger and mostly handheld (though either one could be used in a pinch in either case).

    My two cents.
    Geoff Stahl
    San Jose

    BLTc, Chameleon Single Speed, Speedvagen Road

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    103
    I have been looking at the Oregon but after many years of success with my 205 going back to AA cells isn't a win .. for the past 2-3 years i have used my 205 4-5 times a week, after each ride just plug into a usb charger and done .. yes the battery life has decreased very slightly but not bad .. droid

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by masterofnone
    I've been flirting with the idea of a gps, so here's a noob question. With the edge you can swap it between bikes, this means I can track separate routes and like a regular computer keep track of separate mileage (e.g. a road bike, mountain bike, and a third application like a navigator in the car)? Can the oregon 450 do this?
    The Oregon, like all the handheld models, doesn't care what you use it on. It's easy to bounce it from one activity to another, and set the trip computer screens for each activity. But it only keeps a single running odometer of total miles.

    If you want to keep track of mileage for each different activity, you'll have to do that on your computer using your fitness software of choice.

  10. #10
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbikedroid
    I have been looking at the Oregon but after many years of success with my 205 going back to AA cells isn't a win .. for the past 2-3 years i have used my 205 4-5 times a week, after each ride just plug into a usb charger and done .. yes the battery life has decreased very slightly but not bad .. droid
    Use rechargeable AA's and all you have to do is swap your drained set for a new set. And when your charge capacity drops, replace them and use the old ones for less energy-hungry purposes.

  11. #11
    Combining Old and Bold
    Reputation: DrHog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    94
    Quote Originally Posted by gstahl

    Why not bring out just a few package sizes (some color some not) and allow the user to say... today act like a cycling computer, tomorrow I am going for hike. Even if garmin did this expertly the Oregon and Edge would be two different units one smaller lighter weight for the handle bars mostly and one larger and mostly handheld (though either one could be used in a pinch in either case).
    I think you make a fair point, and I think Garmin thinks that they can sell multiple units to the same customers if they engage in different activities. Maybe they can, but I like your approach of making a unit be able to morph into different specialties via software choices. Who knows, maybe they would even sell more units because more people would see the value of a single unit for multiple activities.

  12. #12
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by DrHog
    I think you make a fair point, and I think Garmin thinks that they can sell multiple units to the same customers if they engage in different activities. Maybe they can, but I like your approach of making a unit be able to morph into different specialties via software choices. Who knows, maybe they would even sell more units because more people would see the value of a single unit for multiple activities.
    Garmin HAS done this already.

    The Oregon can, using its software, switch between different modes on the trip computer that work well for different things. The Oregon can use a HRM and a speed/cadence sensor. The Dakota 20 can, too (but not the Dakota 10). For casual users, you can do this. Shoot, I've even been using my Oregon running lately.

    No, the Oregon doesn't have ALL of the fitness features available with a Forerunner or an Edge. But that doesn't bother me one bit, because I never used them even when I did own an Edge 705.

    Sure, if someone WANTS to buy multiple GPS receivers and if someone has the money to buy multiple GPS receivers, they can buy the very niche receivers for fitness.

    But for someone who can only have one due to finances, or someone who only wants one GPS for simplicity's sake, it's a much more reasonable prospect with a Dakota 20 or an Oregon than it ever has been with previous GPS receivers like the eTrex or the GPSMap series. And since the new GPSMap series models use the same software as the Dakota and Oregon receivers, they have a degree of multi-use capability, too (though somewhat less so due to their increased size).

    Of course Garmin would love to sell you a different receiver for every activity you do. And there's really nothing stopping you from getting an Edge for biking and a Foreruner just for running and one just for golf and so on and so forth. But Garmin also recognizes there's a desire for one that can be used for many things. They do make some that can do that. You just have to pay attention to see it.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,219
    I honestly don't need or want the cycling specific stuff or training aids of the edge, most of it is stuff I wouldn't even look at, the oregon 450 does look more like what I have in mind. Is it as durable for trail riding as the edge and does the mount hold the unit securely in lumpy bumpy stuff?

  14. #14
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by masterofnone
    I honestly don't need or want the cycling specific stuff or training aids of the edge, most of it is stuff I wouldn't even look at, the oregon 450 does look more like what I have in mind. Is it as durable for trail riding as the edge and does the mount hold the unit securely in lumpy bumpy stuff?
    IMO, the mount is worlds better than the Edge 705 mounts. It's quite secure for me. I used to have to rotate the Edge because I'd bump it and the mount would rotate around my stem. This one does not, even though there's a bigger GPS attached to it. The release tab is big. It can be tricky to reach, underneath the GPS (it would be hard if you have manly sausage fingers for sure), but it holds well and will not snap off because I press a little too hard or catch it on something.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,219
    Ok, this is cool. I considered the turn by turn navigator feature on my phone but it's not weatherproof, you can't read it in sunlight, it won't survive a crash, it's relatively useless offroad, and it'll eat up battery life and minutes like a fat kid in a candy store. I wanted a gps that could be used on the bikes (I'll use it in the car too), but I've been holding off because I couldn't justify all the extra training features of the edge that I would never use. This has been a very informative thread, despite your critics. I think I know what I'll be buying myself for Christmas this year...

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    When I first saw the Edge 800 coming to town..I was like...wow, this is the GPS I want...it seems to have everything I need. But as I looked into it further and started to reflect on what aspects I would use, I came to realize that I would most likely not utilize alot of the training features of the 800. Then I turned my sights on the Oregon Gps. First I looked at the 400,450, and now the 550. Originally, I thought I probably would not use a camera but the more I think about that, the more I think I will use it instead of my phone or a separate camera in tow.

    Ive moved most of my riding to offroad trails now and really want to keep a log of my rides and photos along the way as well which will help me remember the ride better.

    I've decided to go with the Oregon 550t and my only real question now is...with the Oregon 550t being out for a bit now, is Garmin on the edge of releasing a new model to replace it, and do I want to go with the Garmin bike mount or go with something more user friendly like the Ram Mount.

    Thanks for the Thread as I was gonna start something myself!
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  17. #17
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by rmasse10
    When I first saw the Edge 800 coming to town..I was like...wow, this is the GPS I want...it seems to have everything I need. But as I looked into it further and started to reflect on what aspects I would use, I came to realize that I would most likely not utilize alot of the training features of the 800. Then I turned my sights on the Oregon Gps. First I looked at the 400,450, and now the 550. Originally, I thought I probably would not use a camera but the more I think about that, the more I think I will use it instead of my phone or a separate camera in tow.
    the camera will be fine if all you want to do is post your snapshots online. I did not want the bother of it because I like to take better pictures, and I hang my best ones on the wall in my house.

    Ive moved most of my riding to offroad trails now and really want to keep a log of my rides and photos along the way as well which will help me remember the ride better.
    You'll probably learn like most of us do at some point that you're not going to take as many pictures as you think. On most of my rides, I don't even bring the camera because I know I'm more interested in riding. If I'm going to take photos, I have to make that the focus of the ride.

    I've decided to go with the Oregon 550t and my only real question now is...with the Oregon 550t being out for a bit now, is Garmin on the edge of releasing a new model to replace it, and do I want to go with the Garmin bike mount or go with something more user friendly like the Ram Mount.

    Thanks for the Thread as I was gonna start something myself!
    Why the t? Plenty of free maps available to you. If you are constantly waiting for the next new gadget, you'll never wind up enjoying what's already out there. Garmin will release new models...whenever they darn well feel like it. It seems to me that the new touch screens and such are really only just now coming into their own. The early adopters have had them awhile, but everybody else was happy with what they had for quite awhile (I know I was).

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    the camera will be fine if all you want to do is post your snapshots online. I did not want the bother of it because I like to take better pictures, and I hang my best ones on the wall in my house.



    You'll probably learn like most of us do at some point that you're not going to take as many pictures as you think. On most of my rides, I don't even bring the camera because I know I'm more interested in riding. If I'm going to take photos, I have to make that the focus of the ride.



    Why the t? Plenty of free maps available to you. If you are constantly waiting for the next new gadget, you'll never wind up enjoying what's already out there. Garmin will release new models...whenever they darn well feel like it. It seems to me that the new touch screens and such are really only just now coming into their own. The early adopters have had them awhile, but everybody else was happy with what they had for quite awhile (I know I was).
    I tend not to print anymore although I have the equipment to produce great looking wall shots...just so busy with life that it is easier for me to just keep them on my phone or computer

    I tend to focus on the ride...but like the option of having a camera when its needed

    I will most likely take the plunge this week as I got lost temporarily yesterday on a ride...I ended up figuring it out (hence me typing here now) but dont like that momentary "Where the hell am I and how do I get back" feeling
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  19. #19
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by rmasse10
    I tend not to print anymore although I have the equipment to produce great looking wall shots...just so busy with life that it is easier for me to just keep them on my phone or computer

    I tend to focus on the ride...but like the option of having a camera when its needed

    I will most likely take the plunge this week as I got lost temporarily yesterday on a ride...I ended up figuring it out (hence me typing here now) but dont like that momentary "Where the hell am I and how do I get back" feeling
    Be aware that there may be times when you don't want GPS coordinates of your subject matter in the photo's EXIF data. This is probably the biggest reason I don't have a setup that will automatically geotag photos for me. I geotag photos manually only when I want. Yeah, it requires me to carry a separate GPS and camera...but I prefer it that way.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Be aware that there may be times when you don't want GPS coordinates of your subject matter in the photo's EXIF data. This is probably the biggest reason I don't have a setup that will automatically geotag photos for me. I geotag photos manually only when I want. Yeah, it requires me to carry a separate GPS and camera...but I prefer it that way.

    Understood...most of the photos are for me....I taught Social Networking and how to use it for your business for years and the privacy issues with it etc so I know all about it all too well.

    thanks for the info
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scoutcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,988
    the edge is probably better for using with gloved fingers. i think that reading a map while riding is almost useless - how often do you realy need to see your blip on a map. looking at the map on my computer is good enough. i think the better choice for money and cycling specific features is the edge 500. i dont think AA batteries is a plus at all.

  22. #22
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by scoutcat
    the edge is probably better for using with gloved fingers. i think that reading a map while riding is almost useless - how often do you realy need to see your blip on a map. looking at the map on my computer is good enough. i think the better choice for money and cycling specific features is the edge 500. i dont think AA batteries is a plus at all.
    who said anything about reading the map WHILE RIDING? I dunno about others, but if I need to look at a map, I stop riding for that. And yes, some of us ACTUALLY ride places where we might need to look at a map from time to time. If you don't ride places like that, then that's fine for you, but most people need a map at least the first time they ride somewhere.

    I don't wear full-finger gloves except for maybe a month or two out of the year. But to be honest, I don't often flip back and forth between screens over the course of a ride, either. And even if it winds up being that I need to on a ride, many gloves are available now with fingertips that can even operate an iphone's touchscreen. And the touchscreen on the Oregon is not the same type, either, and simply requires pressure (that can be applied with a stick if necessary).

    I'm curious why you don't think AA batteries are a positive feature? You're not strapped to a charger if you're out riding/camping for a couple days. Sure, using alkalines or lithiums can get expensive, but if you have a couple sets of rechargeable AA's, you get the best of both cases.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Well, I went ahead and just bought the 550t from PcNation for $489.00...Cabela's had it for $454.99 but it was a backorder deal and I did not know how long that would take.

    I plan on putting it to the test this weekend and see what it can do so will keep my fingers crossed....

    My next question now is the mount...what are your thoughts on the mount for this badboy...the one from Garmin or the one from Ram or someone else....

    let me know

    thanks
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Oh, and on another note...I often use Pricegrabber.com to find the best price of something and to order online...it usually does a great job so if you havent tried it, you may want to give it a shot
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  25. #25
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    the Garmin mount has been working flawlessly for me. I'll never forget the story of the guy who's face got destroyed by a RAM mount in a crash, so I'll never be able to recommend one.

    Rider down: cnbiker (Thurs night Gap ride disaster)

    You still didn't say why you paid extra for a GPS with maps already on it considering all the free options out there.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    the Garmin mount has been working flawlessly for me. I'll never forget the story of the guy who's face got destroyed by a RAM mount in a crash, so I'll never be able to recommend one.

    Rider down: cnbiker (Thurs night Gap ride disaster)

    You still didn't say why you paid extra for a GPS with maps already on it considering all the free options out there.
    I was thinking about that as I was contimplating it...I ended up getting the Garmin mount but got it from Amazon for less than Garmin is selling it (with shipping) plus Garmin claims to take 4 days to process the order...whatever, Amazon will have it to me by end of this week...so Im good

    thanks
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    71
    Hi guys,

    I'm about to sell my Edge 705 to get an Oregon 450. Just want to make sure that the Oregon not only display cadence and HR, but also record it for thansfert to computer. Also, can it calculate the calories burned?

    Thanks

  28. #28
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    it does not calculate calorie consumption. I am unsure about recording HR/cad since I don't have the sensors to verify.

    if calorie computation is important, maybe wait for the Edge 800?

    what features of the Oregon 450 do you want?

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by Yanick
    Hi guys,

    I'm about to sell my Edge 705 to get an Oregon 450. Just want to make sure that the Oregon not only display cadence and HR, but also record it for thansfert to computer. Also, can it calculate the calories burned?

    Thanks
    I would think that when you upload it to your computer...the calories will be calculated although I dont know how accurate it is as it cant take into account the terrain you are on, for example, riding on the beach in the sand is alot harder than riding on a paved road, regardless of distance
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    So my Oregon 550t is suppose to arrive on Friday and my bike mount for it will arrive tomorrow...hopefully I will get the oregon a day early..but lets see
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  31. #31
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by rmasse10
    I would think that when you upload it to your computer...the calories will be calculated although I dont know how accurate it is as it cant take into account the terrain you are on, for example, riding on the beach in the sand is alot harder than riding on a paved road, regardless of distance
    it does not. the calorie computations are done by the GPS (those that offer the feature) and the calorie data is stored in the .tcx file. Most software does not offer calorie computation.

    This is my run on Sunday with my Oregon 450. No calorie consumption data. Also note that it lacks the additional data fields you find on a fitness GPS. (I had to upload from a .gpx file rather than a direct upload because I had to delete an extra track point that got dropped at my house just before I uploaded).

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/50584783'></iframe>

    Note how the data fields differ from an Edge 705.

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/29123199'></iframe>

    Or a Forerunner 205

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/50961442'></iframe>

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    it does not. the calorie computations are done by the GPS (those that offer the feature) and the calorie data is stored in the .tcx file. Most software does not offer calorie computation.

    This is my run on Sunday with my Oregon 450. No calorie consumption data. Also note that it lacks the additional data fields you find on a fitness GPS. (I had to upload from a .gpx file rather than a direct upload because I had to delete an extra track point that got dropped at my house just before I uploaded).

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/50584783'></iframe>

    Note how the data fields differ from an Edge 705.

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/29123199'></iframe>

    Or a Forerunner 205

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/50961442'></iframe>
    I hear ya...I personally dont care since I dont believe the calories that are calculated anyways...not getting it for that
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    So the Oregon GPS bike mount showed up today right on time from Amazon...its alot bigger than I thought it would be for some reason...looks like it will do the trick and so far I think I am glad that I went this route over the RAM mount. It will depend on how easy it is to take the GPS on and off...that will be the key!

    I will give my pseudo report when it all comes in and I get it up and running!
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    So the Oregon 550t showed up today...first reaction was, that I thought it was a bit smaller than I thought it would be...probably because I had read and reviewed so many people talking about it and most mentioned how big it was or how heavy...but I was pleasantly surprised. The screen I wish was more crisp but very nice either way.

    Im hoping to get out on the bike trail tomorrow and see how it does. I also made sure all the upgrades were on it, which were not so now running version 3.9. All in all, I feel pretty happy with the unit from the limited playing I have done with it so far.
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Ok, so I finally got out with my new 550t mounted with the garmin bike mount and I must say...very nice setup.

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/51408494'></iframe>

    And for being a 3.2MP camera, I am very impressed with the pictures considering what it is...work very well. Getting the garmin off and back on again to take a picture was very slick. Only gripe I have with the camera is that it is not fast enough...but no big deal there.

    Aside from that, I was afraid that sun was going to be a factor, even with my sunglasses on, but it turns out that it was no problem at all. I could see the screen easily (but I have my settings turned up all the way)

    The main reason I went with the 550t and not the edge 800 (soon to be out) is because of flexibility. With the Edge, it really is designed for biking..more so street biking although you can do off road easy enough. Its built to be a trainer. Since I am not training for anything and dont need a virtual trainer/rider, I dont really need the edge 800. The 550t is really designed to be pretty much everything else. Outdoor activity, from biking, to boating, to hiking, to whatever you can think off. If you want to get some training info, you can buy a heart rate monitor or cadence sensor and go for it.

    The only other thing I would have loved, because I live in Florida and I really have to watch the heat out in the open, is the temperature. It seems like a little thing and I am kinda surprised that it does not have temperature. I am unclear if there is a temperature sensor in the garmin 550t, and they just haven't activated it thru the software...but whatever the case, water temperature is really not needed.

    All in all, the Garmin 550t will fit the gap between users that want a bit more flexibility than using the edge series gps.

    I couldnt be happier.
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,219
    Is the brightness of the screen adjustable? If strapped to the bike for after dark rides a bright screen for me would be distracting at best.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by masterofnone
    Is the brightness of the screen adjustable? If strapped to the bike for after dark rides a bright screen for me would be distracting at best.
    Yes screen brightness is adjustable...how it will look at night...I dont know, but you can adjust from low to high brightness
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  38. #38
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by rmasse10
    Yes screen brightness is adjustable...how it will look at night...I dont know, but you can adjust from low to high brightness
    Yes...you can also let the backlight go out, too. If you touch it, the light comes on so you can see, and then after a time, it will turn off again.

  39. #39
    Trail Cubist
    Reputation: SWriverstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,135
    Just bumping this thread and also wanted to post a couple comments.

    Someone suggested above that my "review" is pretty biased in favor of the Oregon...and I admit that's true. I do like the Oregon better...but just to clarify, I did say the following (and reiterate it here):

    • If you're seriously training and really need training-specific features like lap times, a pace bike, grade, etc then stop right now and go get an Edge.

    • And if size and weight are big issues for you, then get an Edge.

    Those, IMO are the only advantages to getting an Edge, period. Outside of training-specific features, you'll find that not only does the Oregon do everything the Edge does...but it does it better. For example...

    • The Oregon allows a far higher number of waypoints to be stored.
    • The Oregon allows a far greater number of routes to be stored.
    • The Oregon has more internal memory.
    • The Oregon's screen is larger, which is definitely a plus when they're so small to begin with
    • The Oregon has all of the multi-modal features: it can be configured for biking, for driving, etc. and the screens can be customized just like the Edge
    • The Oregon uses AA batteries—some say "So what?" and my response is "If you never ride more than a few hours, that's true—so what?" But you can use rechargeable AAs and there are times when not needing a charger (or USB cable) is very convenient.

    So this isn't a "fight" between the Edge and the Oregon. For serious training, the Edge is better, period.

    But if all you want is to find your way through the woods while riding, you're better off with an Oregon—and I'll gladly debate that with anyone.



    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  40. #40
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone
    Just bumping this thread and also wanted to post a couple comments.

    Someone suggested above that my "review" is pretty biased in favor of the Oregon...and I admit that's true. I do like the Oregon better...but just to clarify, I did say the following (and reiterate it here):

    • If you're seriously training and really need training-specific features like lap times, a pace bike, grade, etc then stop right now and go get an Edge.

    • And if size and weight are big issues for you, then get an Edge.

    Those, IMO are the only advantages to getting an Edge, period. Outside of training-specific features, you'll find that not only does the Oregon do everything the Edge does...but it does it better. For example...

    • The Oregon allows a far higher number of waypoints to be stored.
    • The Oregon allows a far greater number of routes to be stored.
    • The Oregon has more internal memory.
    • The Oregon's screen is larger, which is definitely a plus when they're so small to begin with
    • The Oregon has all of the multi-modal features: it can be configured for biking, for driving, etc. and the screens can be customized just like the Edge
    • The Oregon uses AA batteries—some say "So what?" and my response is "If you never ride more than a few hours, that's true—so what?" But you can use rechargeable AAs and there are times when not needing a charger (or USB cable) is very convenient.

    So this isn't a "fight" between the Edge and the Oregon. For serious training, the Edge is better, period.

    But if all you want is to find your way through the woods while riding, you're better off with an Oregon—and I'll gladly debate that with anyone.



    Scott
    Good clarification.

    On another note - it seems Garmin Connect is down today, since the maps I embedded aren't displaying right now.

  41. #41
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,817
    This was posted a couple days back:

    Please note: Garmin Connect will be unavailable Wed 11/17 from 7am to 3:30pm Central because of scheduled maintenance. Thanks!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  42. #42
    Single Speed Junkie
    Reputation: crux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,108
    One question I have is how does one get the 3D maps on the standard 450 or 550 models?

  43. #43
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by crux
    One question I have is how does one get the 3D maps on the standard 450 or 550 models?
    You need Garmin's maps that include a DEM. It seems theoretically possible to make a custom vector topo with a DEM, but I haven't seen any.

  44. #44
    banned
    Reputation: Flankerdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    347
    What is the difference between the 450, 450c, and the 450T?

  45. #45
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Flankerdog
    What is the difference between the 450, 450c, and the 450T?
    Functionally, nothing. What accounts for the price difference are the preloaded maps on the T. I don't see a c on their product list for the Oregon series.

  46. #46
    banned
    Reputation: Flankerdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    347
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Functionally, nothing. What accounts for the price difference are the preloaded maps on the T. I don't see a c on their product list for the Oregon series.
    So if a guy lives in Mexico, for which no preloaded map will work, does it make sense to pay the extra dough?

    Would a 200 series do the job?

    I'm just looking for something to get me out of trouble as I explore a new (to me) area. I've found trail maps on line from other users and will be able to upload.

    Good info, well thought out and clearly written. Thanks.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    290
    Very useful thread. Thanks for that OP. I have accumulated several GPS units over the years; mostly as a result of boating and kayaking. My best handheld is a Garmen Colorado, a model previous to the Oregon, with US marine charts. After reading your post I think I'll get a handlebar mount for it and buy the US maps (about $130) and use it as car, boat and bike GPS.

  48. #48
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,817
    Quote Originally Posted by washington_desert_rat
    Very useful thread. Thanks for that OP. I have accumulated several GPS units over the years; mostly as a result of boating and kayaking. My best handheld is a Garmen Colorado, a model previous to the Oregon, with US marine charts. After reading your post I think I'll get a handlebar mount for it and buy the US maps (about $130) and use it as car, boat and bike GPS.
    Look at the free maps available from www.gpsfiledepot.com and see if those will serve you needs before you buy. I live in CA and the topo has 20' contour intervals and is much more detailed than anything Garmin hast to offer!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Ok, so I got an early christmas gift from a friend of mine...just got the Edge 800 to add to my GPS's. I cant wait to get it out on the trail which should be this Sunday.
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    44
    I have the Oregon 550t and an Edge 500. The trails I ride on, the 500 hits the spot. In direct daylight I can not see the Oregon 550t display very well. To see it you have to touch the screen or the disable the timer for back-light, which will eat batteries. I have also had a problem with the Oregon 550t not reading my HRM at 1 second intervals.

    I like the Edge 500 far better for biking than the Oregon. It just works. I can see the screen at all times without touching in direct sunlight. If the Edge 800 is like the Edge 500 than that is what I would buy.

    Oregon 550t
    2.3" x 4.5" x 1.4" 6.8 oz (192.7 g) with batteries
    16 hours (not with the back-light on so you can see the screen)
    There is no way you get but about half that time if you have the back light active
    so you can see the display.

    Edge 800
    2" x 3.7" x 1" 3.5 oz
    15 hours

    The Oregon 550t is hugh compared to my Edge 500. That a lot of weight and bulk on the stem, which becomes a projectile if you crash.

    Just my opinion

  51. #51
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonoran_Flyer
    I have the Oregon 550t and an Edge 500. The trails I ride on, the 500 hits the spot. In direct daylight I can not see the Oregon 550t display very well. To see it you have to touch the screen or the disable the timer for back-light, which will eat batteries. I have also had a problem with the Oregon 550t not reading my HRM at 1 second intervals.

    I like the Edge 500 far better for biking than the Oregon. It just works. I can see the screen at all times without touching in direct sunlight. If the Edge 800 is like the Edge 500 than that is what I would buy.

    Oregon 550t
    2.3" x 4.5" x 1.4" 6.8 oz (192.7 g) with batteries
    16 hours (not with the back-light on so you can see the screen)
    There is no way you get but about half that time if you have the back light active
    so you can see the display.

    Edge 800
    2" x 3.7" x 1" 3.5 oz
    15 hours

    The Oregon 550t is hugh compared to my Edge 500. That a lot of weight and bulk on the stem, which becomes a projectile if you crash.

    Just my opinion
    I find the Oregon 450's screen to be MORE visible in direct sunlight than it is in the shadows. If I'm stopped in the shade, I have to take of my sunglasses and play with the angle of the GPS to get the best view. If I have light shining on it from the sun, I see it fine with my shades on even. I removed the screen protector I was using because it made visibility in the shade worse.

    I also find the mount to be very secure. I've had no troubles with it. If anything, it's tough to remove the GPS when I need to. It's not so tough that it's a problem, but it's tough enough for me to recognize the GPS is being securely held. I have stem mounts on two bikes. I use the GPS for hiking, biking, and geocaching and I get the advertised life from alkalines. I'm getting through my supply, though, so it's time to upgrade to eneloops to save some money and reduce my battery trash.

    Think the Oregon is huge...try a GPSMap 76 CSx sometime. The Oregon is compact in comparison, and on my bike the Oregon nestles onto the stem perfectly without any protruding parts.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    I find the Oregon 450's screen to be MORE visible in direct sunlight than it is in the shadows. If I'm stopped in the shade, I have to take of my sunglasses and play with the angle of the GPS to get the best view. If I have light shining on it from the sun, I see it fine with my shades on even.
    I haven't used my Garmin Colorado on my bike yet but on the flying bridge (unshaded) of our cabin cruiser (a Carver Santa Cruz 25) it has great visibility in bright sunshine. But a bit more difficult to see in the shade. It might be a tad big for the handlebars though. I'll know by spring.

    WDR

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    44
    In Arizona most devices with a touch screen do not have enough contrast to see in Midday Sun. So that is why I tend to favor the Edge 500.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonoran_Flyer
    In Arizona most devices with a touch screen do not have enough contrast to see in Midday Sun. So that is why I tend to favor the Edge 500.
    Ahh.... that explains why my Garmin Colorado works ok in bright sun... it's not a touchscreen.

    WDR

  55. #55
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonoran_Flyer
    In Arizona most devices with a touch screen do not have enough contrast to see in Midday Sun. So that is why I tend to favor the Edge 500.
    I live in Texas, so I'm no stranger to bright sun, either. But shadows are still more challenging than direct sun on the Oregon 450, IMO.

  56. #56
    Trail Cubist
    Reputation: SWriverstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,135
    Just a followup...a friend with an Edge 800 did a ride last weekend in extremely cold weather (around freezing or below). He said his Edge "froze up" a few times and wouldn't work.

    I don't know if that was just his? Or this is a problem with all Edge units in extreme cold? I know my Oregon works flawlessly in temps down to the teens with sub-zero wind chill (on my motorcycle).

    The other Garmin unit that often gets forgotten but I think is absolutely worth the money is the eTrex Vista Hcx. It's tiny, has all the critical features, holds a micro-SD card, and has a brighter, better screen than either the Edge or the Oregon models (it's bright in blinding, direct sunlight or dark shade).



    I used one of these for a few years before getting the Oregon, and it never failed me. The only thing that was a bit difficult was manipulating the tiny buttons with motorcycle gloves on (which is one reason I got the Oregon).

    For $179, you cannot beat this little GPS—no way!

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  57. #57
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    New 800 owner

    I already have the Edge 705 but one week ago I got the Edge 800. The 800 is much more than a 705 with a touchscreen. Several things have changed and my first impressions were not good. But after two rides I am getting used to it.

    It is smaller and lighter than the 705, yet it has a much bigger and easier to read screen. The mounting system is fantastic and the touchscreen is a major step up from the "eraser" and other buttons on the 705. One great addition is the manual altitude calibrate! I had learned to turn on my 705 a half hour before each ride to let it equilibrate. But once in a while I forget.

    One major irritant is the inability to lock the start/stop and lap buttons. When I stop I rarely get off the bike and I sometimes bump them. But at least there is a nice feature to notify you if you move and the timer is not going. The temperature feature is a nice plus.

    I paid $382 for it at Bicycles Outfitters Indy, with free shipping and no tax. (1st order you get 15% off). Below is my first ride. I will attempt to follow it this weekend.

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/58792521'></iframe>
    Last edited by Wherewolf; 12-09-2010 at 10:59 AM.

  58. #58
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    I already have the Edge 705 but one week ago I got the Edge 800. The 800 is much more than a 705 with a touchscreen. Several things have changed and my first impressions were not good. But after two rides I am getting used to it.

    It is smaller and lighter than the 705, yet it has a much bigger and easier to read screen. The mounting system is fantastic and the touchscreen is a major step up from the "eraser" and other buttons on the 705. One great addition is the manual altitude calibrate! I had learned to turn on my 705 a half hour before each ride to let it equilibrate. But once in a while I forget.

    One major irritant is the inability to lock the start/stop and lap buttons. When I stop I rarely get off the bike and I sometimes bump them. But at least there is a nice feature to notify you if you move and the timer is not going. The temperature feature is a nice plus.

    I paid $382 for it at Bicycles Outfitters Indy, with free shipping and no tax. (1st order you get 15% off). Below is my first ride. I will attempt to follow it this weekend. Appears service is out temporarily.
    Good to hear some significant improvements have been made beyond the obvious touchscreen.

    I bought my 705 from that place, too...they do have good prices. Have you found the touchscreen lock? It doesn't work for the start/stop buttons? At least on my Oregon, the touch screen lock is accessed by pushing the power button.

    Does it use the same mount as the other touch screen units with the sliding rail mount? Or is it more like the Edge 500 with the twist?

  59. #59
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    800

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Have you found the touchscreen lock? It doesn't work for the start/stop buttons? At least on my Oregon, the touch screen lock is accessed by pushing the power button.
    Yes, but only locks the touchscreen. I'd like to lock the buttons.

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Does it use the same mount as the other touch screen units with the sliding rail mount? Or is it more like the Edge 500 with the twist?
    Uses the twist on the mount held on by heavy duty rubber bands. Very nice. But I never had a problem with the 705 mount.
    Last edited by Wherewolf; 12-09-2010 at 09:39 PM.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    67
    Hi Wherewolf,

    Thanks for posting your track. I'm still deciding whether to go for the 800 or 705.

    Had a look at both TCX and GPX files from your track.
    I could not find any temperature in the TCX .
    Its in the GPX but the GPX does not show speed or distance (I imagine cadence neither).
    So GPX seems not to include any info from the GSC 10.

    When you convert the fit file to GPX or TCX is there an option to specify the fields?
    It would be a bit of an annoyance that neither GPX nor TCX files contain all the data fields.
    Could you post a link to the FIT file?

    GPX file:
    'trkpt lon="-121.0367641132325" lat="38.918197927996516"
    'ele>183.60000610351562</ele
    'time>2010-12-04T17:02:27.000Z</time
    'extensions>
    'gpxtpx:TrackPointExtension>
    'gpxtpx:atemp>11.0</gpxtpx:atemp>
    'gpxtpx:hr>156</gpxtpx:hr>
    '/gpxtpx:TrackPointExtension>
    '/extensions>
    '/trkpt>

    TCX file:
    'Trackpoint>'
    'Time>2010-12-04T17:02:27.000Z</Time>
    'Position>
    'LatitudeDegrees>38.918197927996516</LatitudeDegrees>
    'LongitudeDegrees>-121.0367641132325</LongitudeDegrees>
    '/Position>
    AltitudeMeters>183.60000610351562</AltitudeMeters>
    'DistanceMeters>150.07000732421875</DistanceMeters>
    'HeartRateBpm>
    'Value>156</Value>
    '/HeartRateBpm>
    'Extensions>
    ' ns3:TPX>
    'ns3:Speed>1.5230000019073486</ns3:Speed>
    '/ns3:TPX>
    '/Extensions>
    '/Trackpoint>
    Last edited by luap; 12-09-2010 at 04:43 PM.

  61. #61
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    Fit file

    Quote Originally Posted by luap
    I'm still deciding whether to go for the 800 or 705. Had a look at both TCX and GPX files from your track. I could not find any temperature in the TCX .
    Its in the GPX but the GPX does not show speed or distance (I imagine cadence neither).
    So GPX seems not to include any info from the GSC 10.
    When you convert the fit file to GPX or TCX is there an option to specify the fields?
    Could you post a link to the FIT file?
    Here is a link to a zip of the fit file. I don't do any converting. I just upload to Garmin connect. They convert for you to download. Even though I am still getting used to the 800, it is much better than the 705. A few mistakes and omissions in the 800 manual. So let me know if you get it. But both manuals are a bit short on how to really use the units.

  62. #62
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    A few mistakes and omissions in the 800 manual. So let me know if you get it. But both manuals are a bit short on how to really use the units.
    I'm betting that you know that Garmin has full manuals online that are not usually in the product package (normally only "Quick Start Guides", erk). Sometimes they are updated as firmware changes, sometimes not. Here is the link, in case.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    Here is a link to a zip of the fit file. I don't do any converting. I just upload to Garmin connect. They convert for you to download. Even though I am still getting used to the 800, it is much better than the 705. A few mistakes and omissions in the 800 manual. So let me know if you get it. But both manuals are a bit short on how to really use the units.
    I just recently went from a 705 to the 800/500, so have been using a mix of all 3 in the past say 2 months. I did sell my 705 (though my husband still has one and loves it).

    I'm not a huge fan of the .fit files (we have felt that the conversion of files and the "image" file particularly may lose some information in "translation"), and my only other real complaint is not being able to record every second without a power tap being mounted/found by the unit at start up. This is somewhat inconvenient for cyclocross racing (it winds up IMO cutting out quite a lot with the short course, vast amounts of corners, etc.), and I like it for checking a.m. HR but can't do any kind of post-recording analysis since it only records every 2-4 seconds or something, rendering the graph/chart fairly useless/flat for a 4 minute period of time.

    I have not used the map much on the 800, but so far prefer it. I love the swipe to change screens. I haven't used the 800 much in super cold or rain, but have read it has no issues.

    The 705 I believe is due to be "decommissioned" in January, so you may be able to find them really clearanced, or may not be able to find them at all soon enough.

    The 500 I think is probably a good race unit with minimal bells and whistles, but find it a little difficult to see the screen sometimes for intervals on my road bike (just because it's a smaller unit and my stem is short).

    While my first few uses of the 800 I wasn't stoked, I'd definitely recommend it over the 705 and 500 (depending on your uses of course). For me as someone that switches bikes every other day (road bike, mountain bike, sometimes cross bike), trains a lot, does intervals, uses power, and wants to be able to download and see my info online and on my desktop computer I am really liking the 800 right now!

  64. #64
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    I'm betting that you know that Garmin has full manuals online
    Yes, and I only use the pdf manuals, not the paper ones. Much easier to read and search through. But still some incorrect information that I had to search for a solution to on the web. E.g. changing data fields is not even close to what the manual says.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,219
    What are the best sites to download street maps for the road bike or is garmin's city navigator worth $80? How is the accuracy of the oregon in a car?
    Last edited by masterofnone; 12-24-2010 at 04:10 PM.

  66. #66
    I'm more of a dog person
    Reputation: unclekittykiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    864
    does the Oregon 450 have the 3D map viewing ability like the 450T?

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jesterrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    629
    800 also has power via ANT+ if you have a power meter. And the 800 hooks up to a scale to interpret your weight.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jesterrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    629

    Edge 800 works in cold

    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone
    Just a followup...a friend with an Edge 800 did a ride last weekend in extremely cold weather (around freezing or below). He said his Edge "froze up" a few times and wouldn't work.

    I don't know if that was just his? Or this is a problem with all Edge units in extreme cold?

    Scott
    I just got an 800 and live in Minnesota. I used it twice in sub 20-degree weather, down to about 10 degrees or so. No issues.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jesterrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    629
    In terms of power - I like the 800. I can get about 15 hours on a charge and carry a small kicker pack to get me more. In 5 years of using Edge products, I've never needed more.
    The 800 touchscreen works fine with gloves. I use winter ski gloves with mine and while a little bulky - it does not require me to take my gloves off.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    922

    450 shakedown ride

    My 60CSx was much easier to read than the 450. I basically have to keep the backlight lit to see it (but I have old eyes).

    Here's an example of the 24K Topo in Basecamp versus how it looks on the 450 (upper left). I was following the track in green from a previous ride. I was using it at 29 degrees this morning, no problem with thick gloves.

    The 24K topo looks better (to me) than what Garmin Connect is offering (for free); The map can be manipulated (rotated/angled) like GoogleEarth.

    The second picture is a custom map I built of the same trail network. Without the relief shading and contour lines it looks pretty drab, but it's free and I can call it up on the Garmin with a click of a button. Note, contour lines can be easily created (downloaded and installed) on custom maps but I find them a bit distracting.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Garmin Oregon 450 vs. Edge 800-basecamp.jpg  

    Garmin Oregon 450 vs. Edge 800-capture.png  

    Last edited by MarkHL; 12-30-2010 at 07:00 PM.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dogpilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    17
    I have both the Oregon 550 and the Edge 800 (Bday present to replace the 705). Since I am a geologist and I fly I have a plethora of GPS devices, occupational hazard. As others have pointed out, the ability to replace the batteries is a silly one. I rarely go more than 12 hours on the trail. If I do, I have a handy solar device that does, my iPhone, 2 AA batteries or a USB charged device. So I can actually go indefinitely, regardless of battery any device needs. The Oregon is really hard to read, unless you have it perfectly positioned on the handlebars, which is a problem, as the Oregon mount only fits in a few spots on most handlebars out there now. The other problem I have had with the Oregon and the bike mount is it can, and has broken on really rough trails. The device is simply heavier and gets a resonance , which breaks the little plastic rails that secure the device to the mount.

    Previous to getting the Edge 800 I used the Oregon to get to difficult to find locations due to its ability to display Birdseye View satellite images. The Edge can do it now as well, so the Oregon is now firmly in the hiking category and off the bike. I like the Edge mount waaaaay better and it is much easier to read. It responds to touch much faster than the Oregon, which sometimes needs repeated stabs at it with gloves on. Since I have to go to London in a week, I may take the Edge, as it is very slim and fits in a pocket better than the Oregon. I've got to go from place to place for meetings and the data charges on the iPhone are hurtful overseas. So I still use the GPS to get to the silly places I have to get to. London has a lot of 'Can't get there from here' issues.

    Sat images are a real boon to find stuff you find from the air. I found this sinkhole from the air. I couldn't locate it from Google Earth, wrong sun angle. Birdseye had a good image. Its actual position on the map was dubious at best, so navigating with the Oregon was necessary at the time to find it on the bike. If I didn't have the image, I literally would have ridden into it as I found it. Less than healthy. As I mentioned, the Edge 800 can do this as well now.

  72. #72
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogpilot
    As others have pointed out, the ability to replace the batteries is a silly one.
    Just because you primarily go out on day trips doesn't mean other folks don't go out for multi-day trips. I do like multi-day trips. I don't have much opportunity to do that on the mtb where I live (East Texas is not known for long distance mtb trails), but I commonly take my GPS out for multi-day trips hiking or paddling. I need user replaceable batteries. Solar is unreliable for me as a recharge option. The idea is nice, but the reality of it is that My local terrain is primarily dense forests. Even the rivers on my paddle trips are shaded by dense forests most of the time. I could still use a solar charger and rechargeable batteries if I was presented with a situation where carrying it would be advantageous (out west in open country, I suppose). Other places I have commonly ridden in the east (thoughout the midwest and a few places in the Appalachians) would not be good for solar, either, not only for the dense forests, but because it is very commonly cloudy or hazy.

    The Oregon is really hard to read, unless you have it perfectly positioned on the handlebars, which is a problem, as the Oregon mount only fits in a few spots on most handlebars out there now. The other problem I have had with the Oregon and the bike mount is it can, and has broken on really rough trails.
    Yes, it is difficult to read at times (deep shade with sunglasses being one of them), but all I need to do is get some direct sun on it and it's perfectly visible. I don't stare at the screen while I ride. I only look at it occasionally when I'm stopped in an unfamiliar place. If visibility is a problem, I just remove it from the mount (on the stem, which is a much better location than the handlebars, anyway...and no durability problems even when on rough terrain or while getting air) to orient it correctly. It's not rocket science.

    Previous to getting the Edge 800 I used the Oregon to get to difficult to find locations due to its ability to display Birdseye View satellite images.
    The Birdseye imagery is worthless for me - no coverage anywhere I ride. I use Topofusion for imagery.

    I like the Edge mount waaaaay better and it is much easier to read. It responds to touch much faster than the Oregon, which sometimes needs repeated stabs at it with gloves on.
    This is the first time I've heard anything about improvements in the screen visibility and response on the Edge 800 over the Oregon or other receivers. I'd like to hear more details on this. I did use my Oregon 450 while geocaching in Michigan over the holiday (my first experience using it with gloves). I was wearing Seirus softshell gloves and did not have any trouble with screen response, to be honest. I do notice, though, that it takes a firm, deliberate touch to operate the screen compared to devices with a capacitive touchscreen, but it compares well with other devices I've used with resistive touchscreens. It doesn't necessarily surprise me that there are improvements in resistive touchscreens, though. Compared to my Nuvi 205w, the Oregon450's touchscreen is MUCH more responsive. Sometimes the Nuvi doesn't even respond to barefingered touches.

    Since I have to go to London in a week, I may take the Edge, as it is very slim and fits in a pocket better than the Oregon. I've got to go from place to place for meetings and the data charges on the iPhone are hurtful overseas. So I still use the GPS to get to the silly places I have to get to. London has a lot of 'Can't get there from here' issues.
    I have taken my Nuvi along on vacations for "getting around". I don't like trying to navigate roads on handhelds. Granted, I have not taken it on any international trips. But I did take it to Hawaii, and Garmin's US street maps are absolutely terrible on the Big Island. I had to install additional maps for that area (I wound up using gpsfiledepot topos) to get to some of the places I wanted to visit.

    Sat images are a real boon to find stuff you find from the air. I found this sinkhole from the air. I couldn't locate it from Google Earth, wrong sun angle.
    If you have not already, look into Topofusion. There are multiple sources of imagery included with the software, and with a little technical know-how, you can add more sources. I agree that having multiple sources of imagery available helps view various things on the ground. With variables like sun angle, satellite angle and sensor type, leaf-on vs leaf-off condition, and date of image acquisition, sometimes the things you're looking for just aren't visible on a certain set of images.

    As I mentioned, the Edge 800 can do this as well now.
    Yes, and that's a good thing because it gives people who want the fitness capabilities of the Edge a better option for viewing maps for navigation purposes. The point I'm trying to make (it may or may not be the same as the OP's point) is that the Oregon is a viable option for folks who only want a single versatile GPS that can be used on the bike or while hiking or whatever. If you've got the coin to have separate GPS receivers for specific functions, then go get an Edge just for biking if you want/need any of the features the Edge 800 has that the Oregon does not.

    Just because you've found a suite of devices that works for you does not mean that same suite of devices will work for me or anyone else. I've found something that works for me. I had an Edge 705 for awhile and yes, while the rechargeable battery worked well on day trips, it was limiting for multi-day trips. Since solar is not viable for me, my recharge option for multi-day trips was a AA USB dongle. I'd still have to carry spare AA batteries...so eliminate the dongle and let me put the batteries straight into the GPS. A non-solar renewable energy recharge option would work well. A hand crank, inertial charger, or whatever...but most of that stuff is not widely available and the options that do exist are often big and clunky and do not offer big advantages over carrying a couple extra sets of AA's. When those options start to get smaller and lighter to compete with the weight of a couple extra sets of AA's, I will reconsider my strong desire for devices that have user-replaceable batteries in the backcountry.

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dogpilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    17
    The battery thing could go on forever. I go out in the field, for weeks, professionally, it is what geologist do. I spent all last summer in Borneo up in the mountains in Ba Kalalan on the Indonesian/Malaysian border. The jungle is a bit more dense there than the Appalachians or East Texas. Solar worked just super for me there. As for imagery, I have no idea what your talking about. I have used Birdseye there and am setting it up for my New Guinea trips after London. I have to go out to the Grasberg Mine in the mountains and oddly enough, Birdseye has the ONLY cloud free images. I am a remote sensing specialist, I do geology from the air and then go to the ground to verify and ground truth what I find. So I do have lots of different imagery products available to me. Including ones I produce myself from the aircraft (which you can load into either unit with some prep). For the price, it works exceptionally well and it is easy to set up to work on either unit.

    The Nuvi is cool if your in a car, but in Central London, you don't drive, unless you want to pay for the inner city access fees. They have automated cameras that photograph your license plates and send you a bill. So you walk, tube or take taxis. Besides, most of Europe has no parking so driving is rather pointless anyway. I take a bike with me when I have to spend extended periods there. It runs about an extra $5 when you declare it as baggage on a train. I did score a bike Friday which I bring now, and it folds small enough to not get the attention of conductors to charge the fees.

    On my Dean Duke, I have carbon handlebars, which taper, the Oregon's mounts always seems to slip from the center, so I have to jam it near the brakes to keep it from sliding down the taper. The Edge mount stays put with an uneven surface, since the bands adjust to fit. It has also chosen to not break the mount so far. I was lucky, since I actually saw the Oregon break off its mount. This precluded a long backtrack to find it, as I would have been bummed to lose it. The Oregon does have a new toy, the Chirp, which I have taken to putting in my backpack, which I have set down, gone to take a few measurements and then had a bit of fun finding it again. The Chirp does let you know if your within 30' of it.

    You can do just fine with either unit. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. They both have enough capability overlay that one can easily supplant the other in many uses. For exercise, the Edge gives you a nauseating amount of data to let you know just how bad of shape your in. The Oregon can give you much, but not all of the data. Its up to you if you need it. What puzzles me, is it all is simply software. They both read the same devices, so it is not out of the realm of possibility to program them to do the same functions. It would be nice if the fitness center could read the Oregon directly, rather than through a file import. Perhaps someday in a future software update it will. I did try the TCX converter program, but it has its glitches in making the files more Edge like.

    If your looking for a solar unit that does work in field conditions and charges just about everything I had, then this one does the trick, jungle or not:
    http://www.google.com/products/catal...wAw#ps-sellers

    I just don't remember Texas or the Appalachian Trail having jungle up to these standards:

  74. #74
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogpilot
    The battery thing could go on forever. I go out in the field, for weeks, professionally, it is what geologist do. I spent all last summer in Borneo up in the mountains in Ba Kalalan on the Indonesian/Malaysian border. The jungle is a bit more dense there than the Appalachians or East Texas. Solar worked just super for me there. As for imagery, I have no idea what your talking about. I have used Birdseye there and am setting it up for my New Guinea trips after London. I have to go out to the Grasberg Mine in the mountains and oddly enough, Birdseye has the ONLY cloud free images. I am a remote sensing specialist, I do geology from the air and then go to the ground to verify and ground truth what I find. So I do have lots of different imagery products available to me. Including ones I produce myself from the aircraft (which you can load into either unit with some prep). For the price, it works exceptionally well and it is easy to set up to work on either unit.

    The Nuvi is cool if your in a car, but in Central London, you don't drive, unless you want to pay for the inner city access fees. They have automated cameras that photograph your license plates and send you a bill. So you walk, tube or take taxis. Besides, most of Europe has no parking so driving is rather pointless anyway. I take a bike with me when I have to spend extended periods there. It runs about an extra $5 when you declare it as baggage on a train. I did score a bike Friday which I bring now, and it folds small enough to not get the attention of conductors to charge the fees.

    On my Dean Duke, I have carbon handlebars, which taper, the Oregon's mounts always seems to slip from the center, so I have to jam it near the brakes to keep it from sliding down the taper. The Edge mount stays put with an uneven surface, since the bands adjust to fit. It has also chosen to not break the mount so far. I was lucky, since I actually saw the Oregon break off its mount. This precluded a long backtrack to find it, as I would have been bummed to lose it. The Oregon does have a new toy, the Chirp, which I have taken to putting in my backpack, which I have set down, gone to take a few measurements and then had a bit of fun finding it again. The Chirp does let you know if your within 30' of it.

    You can do just fine with either unit. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. They both have enough capability overlay that one can easily supplant the other in many uses. For exercise, the Edge gives you a nauseating amount of data to let you know just how bad of shape your in. The Oregon can give you much, but not all of the data. Its up to you if you need it. What puzzles me, is it all is simply software. They both read the same devices, so it is not out of the realm of possibility to program them to do the same functions. It would be nice if the fitness center could read the Oregon directly, rather than through a file import. Perhaps someday in a future software update it will. I did try the TCX converter program, but it has its glitches in making the files more Edge like.

    If your looking for a solar unit that does work in field conditions and charges just about everything I had, then this one does the trick, jungle or not:
    http://www.google.com/products/catal...wAw#ps-sellers

    I just don't remember Texas or the Appalachian Trail having jungle up to these standards:
    River bottoms in the southeast can be quite thick. But that's besides the point. Garmin's Birdseye images are unavailable for my area in Garmin Connect. I'm not going to hold my breath for them elsewhere when I have no other way to preview them. I haven't had any issues with imagery in Topofusion being obscured with clouds, either. It comes from seamless.usgs.gov

    For solar chargers, I'm basing my decision on them from the experiences of folks who have used them in ways that I would also use them. Your use in your professional life would not mirror my recreational use. A solar charger would work well in my professional life as a wildlife biologist, also. But folks who have used them recreationally have found that they don't absorb much of a charge when strapped to a backpack trying to collect sunlight in the forest (even in forests with relatively thin canopies in the United States). The folks who seem to have success with them strapped to the top of a backpack use them in the desert or in alpine areas with NO canopy and clear skies.

    Since I am likely to need a little help with battery life when backpacking or bikepacking, weight is a concern. It would have to be a long trip for the weight of spare batteries to overcome the weight of a solar charger, anyway. And on such a long trip, I would be unlikely to leave the GPS on all the time, anyway, thus stretching the use of a set of batteries in the first place.

    It is not ludicrous to desire user-replaceable batteries, no matter how hard core you think you are.

    The Nuvi works fine in an urban environment regardless of your mode of travel. The battery life isn't great, but is plenty to get you between your destination and the underground in London (yes, I've been there). My annoyance of using handhelds for routing purposes relates to the "beep" prompts mostly, anyway. If you don't care, no skin off my back.

    The Oregon mount is ideal on the stem. It never moves. It doesn't snag on anything. It really doesn't even vibrate because the bottom tab practically rests on the stem. But I prefer my computer on the stem anyway. I use my handlebars for other things like a light or occasionally a horn.

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dogpilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    17
    Your experience with Birdseye preview might improve if you used the Basecamp program, you can preview all you want. Once you subscribe, its $30 for all the imagery you can download, no limit. I am very familiar with the USGS imagery, being located only a couple of blocks from the USGS Campus here in Flagstaff, Arizona. USGS product are spotty out of the US. I have found in areas with poor map coverage the sat views are the only useful ways to get around. If your in SE Asia, in many areas, your GPS will only tell you where you are lost with great precision. The sat views give you a good ground reference to navigate by.

    Again matter of personal preference on batteries. Since I need to carry so many devices, many with their own internal LiPO cells, I ended up working out ways to power them all in the field. Solar is one option, mine, weighing in at 6 oz with two Sanyo AA Enloops in the charger, equal to about two powerbars. I've got both, so I have loads of options. I just really like the Edge's size and screen better. and its mount is, again my preference, better. Not all stems will accommodate all mounts.

    However if you want other lighter options, another device I use, when solar isn't an option is the Minty Boost 3.0, weighs less than .4 oz. Couple it with a LiPO 2000 MA pack it will charge several devices via USB and costs under $20.
    http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10094

    If you want to make one yourself that does solar and has the LiPO pack, fits in an old Altoids tin. Check out the instructables site:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...ger-aka-Might/
    Charge anything or extend its battery life, even your Nuvi.

  76. #76
    Trail Cubist
    Reputation: SWriverstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,135
    I bumped this thread because I keep seeing people debating/pondering/discussing various Edge units...and I still think the Oregons are a better value overall (just my opinion—read the thread and judge for yourself!).

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    6

    Oregon 450

    Hi all found this thread interesting, I currently have a Garmin 60Csx GPS & Polar RS300 HRM & use both when out riding & am looking to combine them both so I can see HR for particular areas of trail I ride (nasty hills!) so I can monitor fitness improvements etc. I also use the 60CSx for geocaching so came to the conclusion that the Oregon 450 (now $299) would meet this requirement. I note you can't see calories by default on the 450 upload which would have been nice. Also I like to see max, average heart rate.

    Therefore am keen to hear from anyone who regularly uses the Oregon who can advise if this info is available either in the default Garmin apps or 3rd party & any other pro's cons they may want to share oh & can you confirm that the HR info is still available with the latest firmware.

    Thanks in advance

    EauMan
    flickr -> Briggsworld

  78. #78
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,817
    Quote Originally Posted by eauman View Post
    Oregon 450 (now $299)
    No help on your question, except that the Oregon is on sale with a rebate.
    Garmin Oregon 450 on sale for $199.99 | GPS Tracklog
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    6
    Thanks I found that but after REI $90 postage to Australia its cheaper shipped from GPSCity who only charge $37 Fedex & their prices are a little less for the HRM strap etc.

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    71
    you do can download all the HR data and do some analysis
    SportTrack for example give you more details than Garmin which is more limited
    But SportTracks is not free anymore
    as you can see with Sporttrack and Garmin Dashboard
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Garmin Oregon 450 vs. Edge 800-sporttrack.jpg  

    Garmin Oregon 450 vs. Edge 800-clipboard03.jpg  


  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    6
    Yanick thanks for the screen dumps. Sportstracks looks good does it have an option to calculate calories & is it a easy process to transfer the data from Oregon?

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    71
    yes, it`s very easy to download from the GPS to SportTracks.
    In fact it's only few steps more than with Garmin dashboard, but it's more reliable as it happen sometimes that garmin doesn't transfer HR or Cadence data. Delete and re-import and it shows it, weird!!

    As for Calories, I haven't look for that. For sure the Oregon doesn't compute it.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    182
    So I couldn't resist getting an Oregon 450 from REI - thanks for the heads up For those of you that have one...

    Anyone recommend a hard clear case?

    Will it still pick up a signal if I put it in a case & throw it inside my pack?

  84. #84
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,428
    Quote Originally Posted by mfshop View Post
    So I couldn't resist getting an Oregon 450 from REI - thanks for the heads up For those of you that have one...

    Anyone recommend a hard clear case?

    Will it still pick up a signal if I put it in a case & throw it inside my pack?
    The Oregon is pretty sensitive to its orientation relative to the sky. The patch antenna necessitates it be pretty much face up to the sky to get the best reception. It might hold a signal in your pack, but it's not likely to be the best reception because the GPS will likely wind up in a sub-optimal position and its tracking will suffer for it.

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •