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  1. #1
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    Garmin Forerunner 405

    Wondering if anybody have any experience with this model. From my understanding it is really meant for runners, which raises my doubt for use in mtbing. Any input regarding accuracy, durability, weather resistance etc... Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I don't have the 405 but I do have the Forerunner 310XT which is a similar product. I got it because I also run and I wanted something I could use for both, if you get the quick release strap then you can direct mount to the bike with the same mount the Edge 500 uses or click into a wrist strap for running.

    On the bike it's great, smaller screen so maps aren't as useful but I never use the maps anyway. More than enough screen for four stats displayed at once, like HR, time, distance and speed. If you get the cadence sensor then you can also have cadence on up to three different bikes on the one device.

    My advice is that if you never run then get one of the Edge series, but if you want something that can do both the Forerunner series is fine for biking and running.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the input....
    Regarding GPS accuracy and signal consistency, do you notice any irregular readings and do you have problems when on a trail with tree coverage where satellite reception might be affected?

  4. #4
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    Tree cover has not been a problem, I've used mine in pine plantation and native (Australian bush) as well as in New Zealand and I have never lost GPS reception outdoors. The worst is actually around tall buildings which can block the GPS signal, but I don't use mine in a city. On very twisty single track the distance tends to under register as the GPS smooths the switchbacks but that improves if you get the cadence sensor - and that also is a problem with all the GPS units though.

    Mine 310XT doesn't have the altimeter by pressure, so the altitude can be off a bit as it's done by GPS location. I know the 500Edge uses pressure and also has temperature on the unit which mine doesn't have. Once I've downloaded into data GarminConnect the altitutde gets corrected by using known altitude for GPS coordinates but in the raw data it can be wrong.

  5. #5
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    I love my 405. The small display is fine for me because I can't really afford to waste time looking during the ride. I can glance down and check my HR or distance/speed with no problem. The wireless data transfer is great. In hilly country with a thick canopy, it takes just a min to locate satellites, but hasn't failed me yet. My recorded trails are pretty consistent with provided trail maps, except my distances are normally a little shorter (2.43 mi vs 2.5 mi) than the posted distances, but who says the 2.5 mi is 100% correct?

  6. #6
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    I use the 405 also. As with any Garmin GPS, tree cover and switchbacks affect the accuracy. I've used my forerunner and 500 on my road bike and the forerunner would lose signal under trees when the 500 didn't.

    I recommend getting a speed / cadence sensor with any Garmin GPS used in the woods as that will fix any accuracy problems.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowducman View Post
    I recommend getting a speed / cadence sensor with any Garmin GPS used in the woods as that will fix any accuracy problems.
    Not entirely true. It will not do anything for the positional accuracy of the track on a map. For that, 1sec recording is the best you can do. The speed/cadence sensor only addresses speed and distance readout on the GPS screen. Some software ignores these values in the GPS data and still reports calculated speed and distance values based on calculations from the positional data. Furthermore, the speed/cadence sensor doesn't even override values on the GPS based on calculations from your position on every model. On some models, the speed/cadence sensor only does anything when the GPS loses a signal entirely.

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