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  1. #1
    I'm Riding It
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    Garmin Edge 305 Heartrate troubles

    Hi guys, I've got the Edge 305 w/ heartrate. And I havent really payed attention to it before, but I'm starting to get into some training for racing, and it clocks my heartrate as 240 many times on a ride (big climbs, etc). I'm 16 so as I understand my heartrate should be around 200 max...
    I've tried wetting down the monitor to get a better reading, but it's still the same.

    I'm pretty sure my heartrate isn't that high ever, but I am going to try out a friends monitor and computer on a ride soon to see.
    Anyone else have troubles with Edge 305 heartrate accuracy?
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  2. #2
    I'm a "she".
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    Yep. Happens fairly often and more on my mountain bike rides than road. The one time I bothered to analyze the cause, I thought it was because I was descending and my windbreaker was flapping on my chest. Not sure if it happened much when I was ascending. I pretty much quit wearing HRM strap now because of it.
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  3. #3
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    So I should try to stay on the road when using my HRM? Because I could do that for training anyways.
    Anybody have any other HRM suggestions that might be a bit more reliable for accuracy?
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  4. #4
    trail rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by oilerfan30
    So I should try to stay on the road when using my HRM? Because I could do that for training anyways.
    Anybody have any other HRM suggestions that might be a bit more reliable for accuracy?
    I use mine on every ride, mostly dirt and some road. I'm 59 and had two stents placed in my heart 2.5 years ago (link in my sig). My cardiologist said no dirt riding, only easy road rides. I bought a Garmin 305 HRM and rode dirt anyway. To prove to him that I am doing OK, I took printouts but told him I was hiking.

    After a few months, I admitted I was mountain biking, he approved once I showed him the charts, but he noticed little things in the chart that were not correct. Being a doctor, he asked me if I was using a conductivity gel, I said "no". He tossed me a tube of it, and said that if I was going to bring him data to support my riding, to use correct procedure to get the best data I could for him.

    Now I use gel, and he and I are both happy. It is the conductivity through the chest wall, not the HRM itself. Get some gel!

    Spectra Electrode Gel is the best deal I have found.
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  5. #5
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    You could just lick it before you put it on. I find when my chest is dry that it doesn't pick it up correctly. As above, it is the chest wall not the HRM.

  6. #6
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    I have tried wetting it down before putting it on to no avail. It's also always soaked when I take it off from my sweat, so I know it's not drying up.
    I just got a sample of electrode gel from my doctor, so I'll try that. If that doesn't help I will be trying a friends HRM and computer and see if it reads different.
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  7. #7
    Double-metric mtb man
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    If you're wearing anything like dogtags or a chain, it can sometimes interfere. My Medic Alert dogtag created some issues until I pum by base layer between it and the chest strap....no issues since.
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  8. #8
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    Have you manually checked your pulse at some point during your ride to see if it comes anywhere close to the 240 figure you mention, even while you are briefly stopped? -GT2005

  9. #9
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    I have, and it has been off by 20 or so BPM, but the fact that it says I've gotten up to 240 worries me. I guess it is possible I have a high heartbeat.
    I haven't been out at all lately as I just came down with a wicked cold. If I'm feeling up for it, I'll give the electrode gel a try.
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  10. #10
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    I've found that the way I curve my back/shoulders when sitting on the bike (vs. standing upright when I put the transmitter on) will cause intermittent connections and cause the heart rate readings to go wonky (on the Garmin it just won't register, but on my Polar's it'll show extremely high heart rates).

    For the plastic style transmitters (like the Garmin, and old-style Polar) I lick them before putting them on. For the new style Polar (fabric feeling), I run it under water.

    Don't discount having a high heart rate. 240 does sound high, but I'm an engineer and not a cardiologist. I had my maximum heart rate measured via treadmill stress test at 197bpm a few years ago, and I'm almost 40. I still consistently hit 195bpm on a local climb, so I know my maximum isn't decreasing very quickly.

  11. #11
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    Went for a ride yesterday, and I've figured out that the only time it clocks my heartrate really high is after cresting a hill and starting a downhill. But if I do that same hill, and after cresting it, go really slow down the hill my reading doesn't go crazy. So I think it's something to do with the wind and my jersey hitting the HRM..
    This is fine, because when I'm training now and it does that on a descent, I can just ignore it, knowing my heartrate isn't that high at all.
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

  12. #12
    Sublime Absurdity
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    I used to have similar problems with an old Polar HRM. In all cases, it was some sort of electrical interferance from powerlines. It would also do that when I had a GPS on near the HRM. Since I got a newer Polar with a coded chest strap, no problems at all. I am interested in this thread because I want to know if the HRM part of the Garmin is problematic like this. Very interested to hear your results.
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  13. #13
    I'm Riding It
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    Things are fine now. I use the electrode gel and things are normal.
    I do still find that after a climb on the trail, if it is followed by a steep technical descent with lots of rattling/rocking, and i'm wearing looser fitting clothing, my heartrate reads around 240, but other than that NO troubles whatsoever. I'm assuming it's from my clothing hitting the HRM.
    www.bikeride.ca
    Alberta born-n-raised mountain bike racer.

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