Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Garmin 910XT?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    99

    Garmin 910XT?

    Has anyone used the 910XT for mountain biking? I like the idea of a watch instead of a mount on the bike, but I wasn't sure if I was giving up capability. I'm mostly concerned with the reception in the tree cover.
    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    57
    I use the 310XT the predecessor to the 910XT you lose nothing when compared to the 500 other than you only get 4 display items rather than the 6 of the Edge 500.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kendal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    59
    I ride under heavy tree cover and no loss of signal. But caloric calculator seems to not b accurate. Seems to calculate 300 Cal difference than same ride on my old 310xt.
    2011 Yeti Big Top
    2012 Santa Cruz Tallboy
    1991 Cannondale m700

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    99
    thanks for the feedback guys. I just picked it up with the HR bundled, I'll let you know how it goes. It picked up satellites at my house pretty quick, so hopefully that's a good sign. I haven't even read the manual comletely yet (typical guy), but did notice a map option that did show the standard arrow on the screen. Can i load maps into this thing? that would be icing on the cake.

  5. #5
    I should be out riding
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    939
    I don't think it takes maps. I have a 310 XT, and it was great for mtn biking, and nice to be able to easily use it for other outdoor activities as well. I got an edge 800 recently, and other then the touchscreen and bigger display with more fields, don't notice it being any better for cycling then the 310XT is. I would think the 910XT will be even better.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    6
    FR910XT can't use maps, you can prepare course on your computer, upload it to the watch and then follow, though.
    NEOTRACK - GPS enabled activity tracking journal.

  7. #7
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,536
    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    I don't think it takes maps. I have a 310 XT, and it was great for mtn biking, and nice to be able to easily use it for other outdoor activities as well. I got an edge 800 recently, and other then the touchscreen and bigger display with more fields, don't notice it being any better for cycling then the 310XT is. I would think the 910XT will be even better.
    maps are where mtb-focused models differentiate themselves. It's why many mountain bikers prefer using handheld models. Fitness features are less important, but maps are.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    maps are where mtb-focused models differentiate themselves. It's why many mountain bikers prefer using handheld models. Fitness features are less important, but maps are.
    I'd say Maps are very important but they can be used as a last-resort if you have a course only ability.

    In 95% watching the course is sufficient to navigate without much hassle.
    The other 5% is in cases where there is a fork in the road and both routes are relatively in the same direction.

    If I wanted to get by with only a 910xt (for example) I would make sure I have a paper map and/or a reliable GPS with a map.

  9. #9
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,536
    Quote Originally Posted by hesher View Post
    I'd say Maps are very important but they can be used as a last-resort if you have a course only ability.

    In 95% watching the course is sufficient to navigate without much hassle.
    The other 5% is in cases where there is a fork in the road and both routes are relatively in the same direction.

    If I wanted to get by with only a 910xt (for example) I would make sure I have a paper map and/or a reliable GPS with a map.
    maps are important on the GPS in some situations where the paper map you have in your hand is not good for navigating with. many park maps fall under this category. maps are also useful on the GPS if you ever free-navigate or explore when riding. A course doesn't help you there.

    having a good map is definitely an important primary navigation source, though. I won't argue that. in simple terms, having a basemap on the gps can help you quickly relate your general position on the map pretty quickly by just doing a visual match on features you can see. if you want the additional accuracy, a coordinate readout is very important, and a lot of basic fitness models don't make coordinate readouts easy to find or reach. I know on my Forerunner, it's a bit of a pain to reach the coordinate readout.

    maps on the GPS are not a be-all end-all solution for mtb riding, but they give you more options when navigating the backcountry. and options are good.

    I will also say this, once I've ridden the trails in an area and mapped them all out (any GPS will do), I can create a transparent basemap of those trails to overlay onto a mapping-capable GPS so I can see how the trail system layout relates to the terrain. If I have this information, and I have no other map that shows the trail system, it becomes my primary navigation source. I have been in these situations before, also. it just depends.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •