Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    284

    Garmin 800 vs. 500 Edge

    I am looking at getting either one of these units and am trying to decipher if the 800 worth the extra money. It seems to me the basic difference is the touch screen, are there any other functions that you may think are important in contrast to the 500?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,918

    Mapping

    The 800 is a mapping gps. It does basically everything a 500 does plus It can display maps, tell you where you have been, and show you where you are going. The 500 is a GPS enabled bike computer. It can tell you how fast you are going, how far, and elevation change, average speed, etc. Its bascially useless as a navigation device
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

    http://www.vrbo.com/392904

    PM me

  3. #3
    Adventure Mapper
    Reputation: forgiven_nick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    516

    etrex 30?

    Though not a cycling specific computer, I just bought the etrex 30 and also wanted something that had functions between the 500 and 800.
    It has ability to connect heart rate and cadence/speed sensors wirelessly through ANT+ connections. It also can load base maps like the 800, is fairly small and light weight, uses AA batteries, and costs the same as the 500.
    I make maps and seek out adventure using a Salsa El Mariachi with a 29+ front end. Read more here:

    RideAlongside

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: oakhills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    903
    All I can say is that I haven't been happy with the 500's accuracy. The older 305 was way better.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    284
    I missed the obvious mapping feature. I am most likely going to use it only as a bike computer in the field and would like to be able to upload the ride to Garmin Connect to then map. Would the 500 be sufficient for that?

  6. #6
    Adventure Mapper
    Reputation: forgiven_nick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    516
    If you don't want to know your position or see it on a map while you are out in the ride, the 500 is perfect.
    I make maps and seek out adventure using a Salsa El Mariachi with a 29+ front end. Read more here:

    RideAlongside

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    284
    @ Nick, thanks!

  8. #8
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,814
    The 500 was conceived as a road bike GPS, so the mapping algorithm is slower to allow for a smaller size, keeping good battery life; it assumes you are going mostly in straight lines.

    The 800 has a faster sampling rate that will be more accurate offroad on twisty track.

    I have typed the whole explanation on the 500 a number of times, search in this forum for my user name and you will find them.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,438
    Note that the 500 now also has a user-selectable 1-second sampling rate. Although with the wheel sensor, I haven't needed to use it yet.

    Once the trees leaf out this summer I'll get a better idea of it's in-woodland functionality.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  10. #10
    Riding or Drumming
    Reputation: funkydrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    The 500 was conceived as a road bike GPS, so the mapping algorithm is slower to allow for a smaller size, keeping good battery life; it assumes you are going mostly in straight lines.

    The 800 has a faster sampling rate that will be more accurate offroad on twisty track.
    I've had both and I too found the 500's reception weak in the woods. 800 is definitely better reception and a much-improved menu interface. Additionally, I do a bit of backcountry riding and do use the mapping with topos I've loaded.

    IMO, the 500 works better for road.
    Tallboy
    Salsa El Mariachi SS
    Salsa Vaya
    Salsa Mukluk
    Surly Big Dummy

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    284
    All good input, will most likely get the 800. Garmin Tech Support sent the following comparison which I found interesting.

    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/compare....eProduct=36728

  12. #12
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    Think ahead

    Think ahead when you buy a GPS. If you can afford it buy more than you think you need because you may grow into the extra functions. If you mountain bike sooner or later you will find the mapping features of the 800 well worth the extra money.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    491
    I got an 800 last spring and really like it. I don't use the mapping and routing features that much, but when I do they are very handy. When in unfamiliar areas, I can put up the map and have it display upcoming intersections/road names and I'll know when a turn is coming up. And if you do get lost on a ride, just hit the route to beginning button and it'll figure out how to get back to where you started the ride. And off-road, it is handy especially with a good topo or trail map. Get a 4GB mini-SD card and load it up with all the maps you can fit on it.

    Also works for geocaching if you are into that. Fun to load up some geocache waypoints along a biking route and hit those on your ride.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    5,290
    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf View Post
    Think ahead when you buy a GPS. If you can afford it buy more than you think you need because you may grow into the extra functions. If you mountain bike sooner or later you will find the mapping features of the 800 well worth the extra money.

    I certainly did.
    With loading the OSM maps, you get trail. I was able to create a ride in a large state park that you can get lost in if your not careful (Henry Coe). I loaded it on my 800 and always knew where I was.

    I could tell when a turn was coming up that I needed to take. Have you ever been blazing down a trail and having so much fun you missed your turn??? I have. You get a loud beeping sound when you miss a turn with the 800.

    I think it's worth it.

    Oh, GET AN ANTIGLARE SCREEN PROTECTOR!!!!!
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ZTallboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    37
    I just purchased the edge 800. I love the unit but having one issue. The mileage tracker doesn't show the mileage when I start the timer and show's ft instead of mph even when I pick distance from the menu and picking statute instead of metric under settings.

    Does anyone know what may be driving this issue?

    Thx


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,438
    Quote Originally Posted by ZTallboy View Post
    I just purchased the edge 800. I love the unit but having one issue. The mileage tracker doesn't show the mileage when I start the timer and show's ft instead of mph even when I pick distance from the menu and picking statute instead of metric under settings.
    Sorry, it's showing your trip distance in feet?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ZTallboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    37
    Yep. It withers shows in feet or doesn't track mileage if I pick course and distance to distance. Thinking its a software glitch or operator issue :-) not much out there on instructions.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    962
    My 800 starts in feet then changes to miles once I get a a couple hundred yards in....

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ZTallboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    37
    I rode for 1:15 minutes today and it was stuck on feet throughout the ride.


    ---
    I am here: http://tapatalk.com/map.php?fasytn

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    491
    Mine will read feet up until you hit 500 ft. then it changes to 0.10 miles and continues in miles. You might contact Garmin tech support and see what they have to say. When I first got mine last year, I had to go through 2 special resets to get it working right. I think I found one real bug in their firmware that they ultimately fixed. But did one reset and then a different one and after that is pretty much worked normally.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,438
    Weird. Wouldn't it run out of room for the numbers in the display window after about 2 miles?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  22. #22
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    Screen capture?

    Quote Originally Posted by ZTallboy View Post
    I rode for 1:15 minutes today and it was stuck on feet throughout the ride.
    Please post a screen capture of this.

  23. #23
    Timbo
    Reputation: Timoshenko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    7

    Good job! Garmin 800

    Have had two issues with an 800; spiking cadence, me thinks caused by freewheeling near the sensor and a one off soft re boot, otherwise a great investment

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,438
    Quote Originally Posted by Timoshenko View Post
    Have had two issues with an 800; spiking cadence, me thinks caused by freewheeling near the sensor
    When I descend (coasting) with my left foot back, I'l sometimes get cadence spikes from the crankarm magnet wavering over the sensor as I go over bumps.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  25. #25
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,814
    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    When I descend (coasting) with my left foot back, I'l sometimes get cadence spikes from the crankarm magnet wavering over the sensor as I go over bumps.
    Yes, you can test this by moving the magnet back and forth, up and down past the magnet; the sensor counts each pass, it has no way to sense if you do circles or up and down passes since it is non-directional in sensing the magnet field. It counts them all, so reports a couple seconds at 200 rpm when in fact you are at zero rpm, bouncing.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  26. #26
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Just got a 500 as a gift. Seems ideal for most uses, is way cheaper and smaller than the 800. Once you set-up a "course" on it, either via downloading someone else's ride or one of your previous rides, you get navigation and "off course" warnings.

    Using a Garmin Edge 500 for Car Navigation - YouTube

    While the 800's mapping would be beneficial for the rare time you venture out on unknown trail, a free iPhone-based GPS (Motion-X app) could get you on track, no?
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  27. #27
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    19,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    Just got a 500 as a gift. Seems ideal for most uses, is way cheaper and smaller than the 800. Once you set-up a "course" on it, either via downloading someone else's ride or one of your previous rides, you get navigation and "off course" warnings.

    Using a Garmin Edge 500 for Car Navigation - YouTube

    While the 800's mapping would be beneficial for the rare time you venture out on unknown trail, a free iPhone-based GPS (Motion-X app) could get you on track, no?
    maybe. map downloads for phone apps need either a data connection or the foresight to cache them before you go out. the phone gps will give you coordinates, but coordinates don't mean anything outside of the context of a map.

    then, you also have to own a phone with a gps and the ability to load a map app in the first place. some of us do not. I refuse to spend that much money for a phone with a data plan when I already pay for an internet connection at home.

  28. #28
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,992

    Unknown city trails?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    While the 800's mapping would be beneficial for the rare time you venture out on unknown trail, a free iPhone-based GPS (Motion-X app) could get you on track, no?
    You riding unknown city trails? Unknown trails you would need mapping features for are generally not covered by cell phones. And how long are your rides, 2 hours?

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,438
    Actually, Google maps has some of the more often-ridden singletrack trails around here, available on the app for phones. I don't think anyone gets lost very often, but I guess there are always out-of-towners.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  30. #30
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    maybe. map downloads for phone apps need either a data connection or the foresight to cache them before you go out. the phone gps will give you coordinates, but coordinates don't mean anything outside of the context of a map.

    then, you also have to own a phone with a gps and the ability to load a map app in the first place. some of us do not. I refuse to spend that much money for a phone with a data plan when I already pay for an internet connection at home.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf View Post
    You riding unknown city trails? Unknown trails you would need mapping features for are generally not covered by cell phones. And how long are your rides, 2 hours?
    iPhone app "Motion-X GPS": MotionX® | MotionX News » MotionX-GPS
    Full-blown GPS on you iPhone. Works well. Costs $1.99. I have an unlimited data plan on my phone, so map downloading is not a concern. If I'm hitting a trail system that I dont know very well, I'll download the map to Motion-X as back-up, before heading out. Rarely have had to use it, unless its suddenly getting dark and we need to find a quick exit.

    I don't like having my iphone mounted on the bar/stem while riding, or even in my pocket (big, heavy, not element-proof and to easy to damage in a crash), so it stays stowed in my pack unused with little batt drain - ready for emergency use in the way of a phone call or GPS navigation.

    The garmin 500 is small/light/element-proof and stem-mounted and provides "enough" nav for 99% of what I do. Between it and MotionX on my iphone, I dont see the need for the bigger/heavier more expensive garmin 800's mapping features, which I'd rarely use.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  31. #31
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    19,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    iPhone app "Motion-X GPS": MotionX® | MotionX News » MotionX-GPS
    Full-blown GPS on you iPhone. Works well. Costs $1.99. I have an unlimited data plan on my phone, so map downloading is not a concern. If I'm hitting a trail system that I dont know very well, I'll download the map to Motion-X as back-up, before heading out. Rarely have had to use it, unless its suddenly getting dark and we need to find a quick exit.

    I don't like having my iphone mounted on the bar/stem while riding, or even in my pocket (big, heavy, not element-proof and to easy to damage in a crash), so it stays stowed in my pack unused with little batt drain - ready for emergency use in the way of a phone call or GPS navigation.

    The garmin 500 is small/light/element-proof and stem-mounted and provides "enough" nav for 99% of what I do. Between it and MotionX on my iphone, I dont see the need for the bigger/heavier more expensive garmin 800's mapping features, which I'd rarely use.
    does your unlimited data plan work absolutely EVERYWHERE?

  32. #32
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,814
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    does your unlimited data plan work absolutely EVERYWHERE?
    As long as it is everywhere you ride, I guess it works.

    Some of us go where phones don't work, let alone data.




    A GPS is nice back there, since it will work and lay down a track, and as backup to a paper map and compass.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  33. #33
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    does your unlimited data plan work absolutely EVERYWHERE?
    In an iPhone Motion-X GPS app context, a data plan is needed solely for downloading maps before you head out on a ride.

    The iPhone Motion-X GPS app can navigate without a SIM card, if needed. Slower and less accurate, but it still works.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  34. #34
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    19,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    In an iPhone Motion-X GPS app context, a data plan is needed solely for downloading maps before you head out on a ride.

    The iPhone Motion-X GPS app can navigate without a SIM card, if needed. Slower and less accurate, but it still works.
    I'm very well aware of that, but you did not catch that I pointed that out in my post? You quoted the statement, even. The way mobile phone apps handle map caching is clunky. I dunno about you, but most of the good trails go through places where cell reception is spotty at best. With a dedicated mapping GPS, you download maps once and they stay there, forever accessible unless you overwrite them. No phone mapping app I've seen does that, unless it's one of the street nav apps that come with all the map data as part of the app. So, you have to do it before EVERY ride.

  35. #35
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I'm very well aware of that, but you did not catch that I pointed that out in my post? You quoted the statement, even. The way mobile phone apps handle map caching is clunky. I dunno about you, but most of the good trails go through places where cell reception is spotty at best. With a dedicated mapping GPS, you download maps once and they stay there, forever accessible unless you overwrite them. No phone mapping app I've seen does that, unless it's one of the street nav apps that come with all the map data as part of the app. So, you have to do it before EVERY ride.
    No, I did not see where you stated that once a map had been loaded, phone-based GPS could navigate just fine w/out a SIM card (ie without any phone service whatsoever). Motion X GPS retains the maps once loaded - no need to reload every time you roll out. So service is not an issue.

    From the MOTION-X iPhone app "Maps" page:

    "Map Downloads and Map Caching are two similar but distinct features. Both improve map performance and enable you to use maps even when your iPhone's data connection is unavailable.
    Due to the licensing agreements with our map providers, Map Downloads and Map Caching are available exclusively for MotionX Road, MotionX Terrain, Bing Road, Bing Terrain, Bing Satellite, Bing Hybrid and NOAA charts.
    Use Menu>Setup>Map Downloads to define an area of the map along with a range of zoom levels to pre-load for offline use when a network connection is unavailable. Once selected and downloaded, these tiles will be saved in MotionX-GPS permanently unless you choose to delete them from the Map Downloads page."


    But I think you may be misunderstanding me. I am not saying a phone-based $1.99 GPS is as good as the Garmin 800. I am saying that for the very rare times I have needed it, phone-based $1.99 GPS has been "good enough" to get me out of the woods.
    Last edited by Stumpjumpy; 06-26-2012 at 11:58 AM.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  36. #36
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    19,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    No, I did not see where you stated that once a map had been loaded, phone-based GPS could navigate just fine w/out a SIM card (ie without any phone service whatsoever). Motion X GPS retains the maps once loaded - no need to reload every time you roll out. So service is not an issue.

    But I think you may be misunderstanding me. I am not saying a phone-based $1.99 GPS is as good as the Garmin 800. I am saying that for the very rare times I have needed it, phone-based $1.99 GPS has been "good enough" to get me out of the woods.
    You are the one with the misunderstanding. It's posted all over in this board about how the GPS chip in smartphones works fine without a signal. There is no debate there. That was only a debate when the 2nd gen iphone came out which DID have a GPS chip and the 1st gen did not. We're on gen 4 now...with 5 to be released probably within a year. Does not need stated.

    The app will store the maps for a single location. If you go somewhere else, you have to load new maps, and the previous ones get wiped from memory. It's map "caching" (temporary), not "saving" (permanent). It makes sense from a memory standpoint. You've got finite memory for storing data, and I know of no app that can store unlimited data. How much area can you store at once? Your whole city? Whole state? The whole United States?

    My first post also implied that you're not paying ONLY $1.99 for an app (or whatever your app of choice costs). You have to buy the phone to begin with. If you want any kind of cellular connection, you have to pay for an expensive data plan. You also either have to pay out a 2yr contract OR spend several hundred for an unlocked phone. That cost adds up. $60/mo for 24 mo comes up to $1440 for the plan. Figure $100 for the subsidized phone (newer and fancier ones cost more...unlocked and you're looking at $500-$600). You're looking at ~$1500-$2000 over two years, plus the cost of apps.

    My Oregon 450 cost me $250 in 2010. I spent $60 on Topofusion to use with it. Add another $50 for a good battery charger and some Sanyo Eneloops. I will be hitting that 2yr mark in about 2mo. I have spent $360 in about two years. So which is cheaper, again?

    Besides, why did you start talking up your favorite iphone app when the OP never asked about phones in the first place? The OP wanted questions answered about the Edge 500 vs Edge 800. Either of those options costs less than a smartphone and its associated service. In light of that question, the only major difference would be maps.

    Edit: It appears you changed your post with more information. I stand corrected. This is a new feature I was unaware of. It still does not change the rest of my post.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    While the 800's mapping would be beneficial for the rare time you venture out on unknown trail, a free iPhone-based GPS (Motion-X app) could get you on track, no?

    Rare? Weekly for me. The 800 is far superior to 705 and makes the 500 look daft. There is really no comparing them to 800 its just not fair. I love mine.
    15 Yeti ASR-c
    14 Yeti ARC
    16 Bianchi Specialissima
    15 Echo Big Deal
    15 Roubaix S-Works

  38. #38
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    You are the one with the misunderstanding. It's posted all over in this board about how the GPS chip in smartphones works fine without a signal. There is no debate there. That was only a debate when the 2nd gen iphone came out which DID have a GPS chip and the 1st gen did not. We're on gen 4 now...with 5 to be released probably within a year. Does not need stated.

    The app will store the maps for a single location. If you go somewhere else, you have to load new maps, and the previous ones get wiped from memory. It's map "caching" (temporary), not "saving" (permanent). It makes sense from a memory standpoint. You've got finite memory for storing data, and I know of no app that can store unlimited data. How much area can you store at once? Your whole city? Whole state? The whole United States?

    My first post also implied that you're not paying ONLY $1.99 for an app (or whatever your app of choice costs). You have to buy the phone to begin with. If you want any kind of cellular connection, you have to pay for an expensive data plan. You also either have to pay out a 2yr contract OR spend several hundred for an unlocked phone. That cost adds up. $60/mo for 24 mo comes up to $1440 for the plan. Figure $100 for the subsidized phone (newer and fancier ones cost more...unlocked and you're looking at $500-$600). You're looking at ~$1500-$2000 over two years, plus the cost of apps.

    My Oregon 450 cost me $250 in 2010. I spent $60 on Topofusion to use with it. Add another $50 for a good battery charger and some Sanyo Eneloops. I will be hitting that 2yr mark in about 2mo. I have spent $360 in about two years. So which is cheaper, again?

    Besides, why did you start talking up your favorite iphone app when the OP never asked about phones in the first place? The OP wanted questions answered about the Edge 500 vs Edge 800. Either of those options costs less than a smartphone and its associated service. In light of that question, the only major difference would be maps.

    Edit: It appears you changed your post with more information. I stand corrected. This is a new feature I was unaware of. It still does not change the rest of my post.
    I amended my post to include the MOTION-X language.
    That did not change the import of the post, however, which clearly made note of the fact that you were obviously basing your opinion on misinformation.

    Hey, look - I was just offering my opinion on these products, based on my ownership and use of the 500. Given the fact that I rarely have the need for full blown GPS on my bike, and that on the rare occasions that I do need it, I have a decent GPS system on my phone which stays in my camelbak, i do not see a reason to incur the added expense, weight and size of the 800.

    Now for folks who are always navigating unknown trails, obviously the 800 would be a godsend.

    Obviously, a smartphone is a device many people buy for many other uses besides GPS, and is something that most gadget-oriented people already own. If you already own one, $1.99 is a small price to pay for a decent GPS system to take into the woods with you as insurance. Sorry if that concept offends your sensibilities.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  39. #39
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    19,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    I amended my post to include the MOTION-X language.
    That did not change the import of the post, however, which clearly made note of the fact that you were obviously basing your opinion on misinformation.

    Hey, look - I was just offering my opinion on these products, based on my ownership and use of the 500. Given the fact that I rarely have the need for full blown GPS on my bike, and that on the rare occasions that I do need it, I have a decent GPS system on my phone which stays in my camelbak, i do not see a reason to incur the added expense, weight and size of the 800.

    Now for folks who are always navigating unknown trails, obviously the 800 would be a godsend.

    Obviously, a smartphone is a device many people buy for many other uses besides GPS, and is something that most gadget-oriented people already own. If you already own one, $1.99 is a small price to pay for a decent GPS system to take into the woods with you as insurance. Sorry if that concept offends your sensibilities.
    It was not misinformation I was basing my statements on. It was old information. Big difference. There are so many phone apps out there with different feature sets and different update frequencies, it's impossible to keep up with it all. Map caching is a relatively new feature on its own. Map DOWNLOADING is even newer. This is why it pays off to provide DETAILS.

    MotionX now allows you to download maps, not just cache them, so if you have a phone and don't need mapping frequently, it's an option.
    Would have been a great way to frame that sort of thing.

  40. #40
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    It was not misinformation I was basing my statements on. It was old information. Big difference. There are so many phone apps out there with different feature sets and different update frequencies, it's impossible to keep up with it all. Map caching is a relatively new feature on its own. Map DOWNLOADING is even newer. This is why it pays off to provide DETAILS.



    Would have been a great way to frame that sort of thing.
    Old information is misinformation when it is the wrong information.

    I provided a link to the Motion-X site - can't provide more detail than that.

    Next time, you may want to read the provided link before embarking upon a gratuitous misinformed rant.

    Oh, and BTW, Motion X GPS for iPhone had the map storage feature back in '09: MotionX® | MotionX News » Fullpower Introduces MotionX-GPS 9.0 for the iPhone

    Fullpower Introduces MotionX-GPS 9.0 for the iPhone

    December 11, 2009

    New Map Storage Lets Users Take MotionX Maps Anywhere Worldwide
    SANTA CRUZ, CA – Fullpower Technologies, the global leader for mobile sensing solutions, today launched an updated version of MotionX-GPS featuring MotionX Map Storage allowing users to take up-to-date MotionX maps well beyond the coverage range of cellular connections.

    MotionX-GPS 9.0 embeds the functionality of an advanced handheld GPS unit into a simple and intuitive iPhone application that is ideal for outdoor activities such as hiking, cycling, running, sailing, skiing, kayaking, motorcycling, and flying. Embraced by more than 2 million outdoor enthusiasts, MotionX-GPS 9.0 for the iPhone 3G and 3GS is available for $2.99 for a limited time through the Apple App Store.

    Now with MotionX Map Storage, users can easily download the latest up-to-date MotionX O-Road and O-Terrain maps for any region of the world before setting out on their adventure. MotionX O-Road and O-Terrain maps are worldwide road and terrain (topographic) maps based on the OpenStreetMap project. MotionX users have taken MotionX-GPS well beyond the coverage of cellular connections to track activities such as sailing across the Pacific Ocean, biking across the deserts of Abu Dhabi, hot air ballooning above the Rocky Mountains and even racing up volcanoes in Guatemala.
    Last edited by Stumpjumpy; 06-26-2012 at 02:02 PM.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •