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  1. #1
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    Edge vs. standard GPS unit

    I currently own two Map 76CS units from Garmin. I'm thinking about adding a GPS to my bike but my feeling is that the Map 76CS would be too big. I've been looking online here and the Edge 605 and 705 seem to be popular. I was checking out Garmins website and I see they have the Oregon which is all touch screen.

    What is the difference between a standard GPS like the Oregon vs using the Edge? Really all that is important to me is speed, trip distance and total distance. Nice to have would be avg speed.

    From what I heard is the Edge doesn't keep total distance and everything needs to be uploaded. The one website that I was pointed to allowed me to keep everything online at their site. I didn't really care for that. If I need to upload information I want it on my PC.

    Thanks in advance for the feedback. When I bought both of my Map 76CS I wanted them for boating first and geocaching second. I no longer own the boat and got bored with geocaching so I'm really starting out in the dark on what to look for when it comes to getting one to work with a bike.

    Anyone use a Map76 on a bike? It would be interesting to hear feedback on the size and if it's really too big.

  2. #2
    saddlemeat
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    I recently replaced a gps I lost and decided to go with the Vista. One of the factors was the replaceable batteries, 2AA, versus a rechargeable unit. I use AA rechargeables and like the ability to simply install fresh batteries anytime, anywhere. Having said that, the bike specific Edge has a lot going also, especially if you train with it. Seems less charging hassel overall and it mounts on the stem nicely. Looks more like it belongs on a bike.

    The other factor was suitability for trail design/construct activities. I normally have the gps on my handlebar, but use it handheld a lot too. I use the enhanced altimeter and compass functions routinely. The Edge models may have this too, I haven't used them at this point because I haven't felt like spending the extra $300 to find out. I don't believe they have the restrctions you mentioned, they are really sophisticated units.

    I guess at this point I also realize that for me, a gps is simply another consumeable item, and the price difference is considerable, especially over multiple purchases. Since I don't normally use the bike/training features of the Edge I would just have more money riding on my bar to lose or break.

    I use a bar mount attached to my stem, so the unit sits sideways. I don't have a problem with the mental flip, and the units is more protected there. I imagine your 76 would mount ok with a bar mount too.

    I have enjoyed being able to load USGS topos in my Vista, especially for trail building activities. I have another micro sd card loaded with free maps from gpsfiledepot for NM, AZ, CO, & UT. They have an amazing degree of detail and work well for general biking activities.
    Last edited by bsieb; 03-31-2009 at 03:39 PM.
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  3. #3
    GPS_dr
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    I normally have two handheld GPS units on my bars when I'm mapping bike trails.
    One is a 76CSx, the other is a DeLorme PN40.

    Last year I was going to get a 705 Edge from Garmin, but had them send me a Colorado 400t instead. It has large hi-res screen, both have heart rate & speed/cadence sensors. The newer units from Garmin do not have the visibility range that the eTrex and 60/76 series color units. New units also don't display multiple tracks at one time - this was critical for my mapping use! Ended up selling the Colorado when I got my PN40.

    The 76 isn't all that heavy, couple ounces difference from eTrex. Since I'm not using it during a race, weight isn't really an issue. It can display a network of 20 trails in various colors.

    My DeLorme displays my entire network of over 1300 miles of trails (126 tracks). Normally have it display them over vector Topo data, can display over USGS quads or aerial imagery as well, but while moving, it is quicker to gather information from the topo data.


    76 isn't really that much bigger than PN40 - just a lot closer to camera
    You can see the mount from the Colorado on the bar - three at once for a while.

    Both of my GPS units have many trip stats to view.
    I don't use it as a training device, so competing versus prior rides or set pace aren't of interest to me.
    Last edited by gps_dr; 03-30-2009 at 09:59 PM.
    2,000+ miles free Colorado FrontRange GPS enabled bike trails w/map overlays.
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  4. #4
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    GPS DR - I think you need more items on your handle bars! I held mine 76CS up to the handle bars last night and I thought it looked huge. Kind of like your picture but maybe I'm just use to not seeing anything or looking at the small bike computer next to it. I did quite a bit of looking online and while I like the Oregon it seems I will only get about $150 each for my 76CS if I sell them. Two Oregon's will set me back $1000. I already have the cradle so maybe I will just get the handlebar mount and give it a shot. Thanks for the picture.

  5. #5
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    bsieb - I agree on the AA batteries. Everything I have is AA and I like to keep it that way. Makes it easier to only need to buy one battery. I like the fact you can have multiple SD cards with different data on it. With mine right now I can only have one or the other. Not that big of a deal since I load up as much as I can which gets me all of WI, half of MN, IL, and MI. If I go on vacation I just reload what I need. Not that big of deal.

    I'm looking more to use the GPS to know where I am. If I ride in an unknown area nice to have that as well if I am riding one of the rails to trails to know where I am at.

  6. #6
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    the edge 705 has the altimeter but not the compass. the short of it is that the Edge series are souped-up cyclecomputers that (in the case of the 705) features full mapping and autorouting capabilities (with the right data loaded, e.g. City Navigator). The others you mentioned are back-country targeted units which can also do autorouting.

    i have used a 705 extensively since may '08 when I got one and have found that it gathers data notabily higher in quality than a gpsmap60csx stuffed into the outermost pocket of my camelbak (on MTB or road bike). The ability of the 705 to collect data at 1 second intervals stomps all over the earlier gen GPSr for data quality - and stress out some applications for dealing with tracklogs. I've had long ride tracklogs with approaching 30,000 trackpoints.

    I'd think the colorado/oregon would mostly work ok on the bars, not too big, but battery-bounce could be an issue and I still like the size of the edge for an h-bar mount much better (i do a lot of technical trail MTB riding, it would not make much difference on more tame trails or road riding).

  7. #7
    GPS_dr
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    IF you want detailed tracklogs:

    DeLorme PN20 /40 allows you to record trackpoints at intervals down to 10 feet or 1 second (If you are going very fast at all, the one second limitation comes in.)
    It will record up to 10,000 points per tracklog and will start new ones as needed till
    you reach the 10 saved tracks and one active track limitation.
    Saving the tracks does not reduce data as happens on Garmins.

    You can lay an entire network of trails into the maps Vector TOPO, USGS quads, 1M B& W or Color imagery and Hi res imagery for metropolitan areas. (My 126 track 1300 mile trail network overlays nicely)
    2,000+ miles free Colorado FrontRange GPS enabled bike trails w/map overlays.
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  8. #8
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    gps_dr,

    I've got to ask how you feel about the PN-40, especially how it stacks up in performance compared to a 76, 60 or Vista. Are you still testing the PN-40 and use both for comparison, or do you just feel better having a backup when out data gathering?

    Looking to finally get a GPS unit and have it down to a PN-40, Vista HCx or 60CSx. The Edge is nice, but just too expensive and although kinda cool, I just don't need all the training bells and whistles.

  9. #9
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    I was looking into the edge range probably the 305?? I want to use it as a back up when hillwalking just to find out my exact position, can they do this? I'm in the uk and use map grid reference compared to longitude/ latitude?

  10. #10
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    i'm pretty sure the garmin units support the different coordinates. you could always go to garmin.com and download the manual to be sure (it's online as a PDF file, probably).

  11. #11
    GeoMan
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    Quote Originally Posted by couby
    I was looking into the edge range probably the 305?? I want to use it as a back up when hillwalking just to find out my exact position, can they do this? I'm in the uk and use map grid reference compared to longitude/ latitude?
    Yep, saw your other post first... Hehe.
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  12. #12
    GPS_dr
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    I've been using the PN40 as my main GPS, but I've been using Garmins for over a decade now and they've always been reliable. The DeLorme will lay down a more detailed tracklog.
    I normally turn it off between trails and let the 76CSx keep on ticking. Has saved me a couple times when I forgot to turn the PN40 tracklog back on... I could leave the PN40 tracking all the time, but could end up with 30,000 trackpoints from a ride.

    The DeLorme doesn't keep running ascent/descent totals but allows me to view both barometric and GPS elevations.
    With the recent DeLorme improvements speeding data entry, and long comments, it will be easier to avoid notepad use.

    They are both great units.
    2,000+ miles free Colorado FrontRange GPS enabled bike trails w/map overlays.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gps_dr
    With the recent DeLorme improvements speeding data entry, and long comments, it will be easier to avoid notepad use.
    When is one of the manufacturers going to allow voice annotations for waypoints?

  14. #14
    GPS_dr
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    Some of the Lowrance Endura and iFinder series allows voice notes. (Sierra, Safari & Expedition C, Hunt C)
    Magellan Triton 2000 and 1500.

    The Tritons and iFinders didn't have the sunlight visibility I needed for handlebar use.
    I initially thought the Triton 2000 would be a great unit with voice notes, large screen, camera)

    Accessory adapter required for the iFinders - could listen to notes on PC with their software.

    Haven't seen the new Lowrance Endura series screens (touch screen with buttons like Triton 1500 & 2000)
    2,000+ miles free Colorado FrontRange GPS enabled bike trails w/map overlays.
    View network via GoogleEarth @ GeoBiking.org

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