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  1. #1
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    Bike computer is the hardest part of my new build.

    It's the last thing I need. All I want is wireless, basic features, one that does what it's supposed to, stays where it's supposed to and not to expensive. Any ideas?
    '96 San Andreas
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  2. #2
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    I've had a cateye strada wireless (CC-RD300W) for a few months now and its lived up to all my expectations. Has all the basic functions, can be had for ~$45, and doesn't move one bit. I have mine mounted to my stem.

    They also have one thats the same but also measures cadence, just a little more expensive.

    Cheapest prices I've found have been on amazon

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuelman22 View Post
    I've had a cateye strada wireless (CC-RD300W) for a few months now and its lived up to all my expectations. Has all the basic functions, can be had for ~$45, and doesn't move one bit. I have mine mounted to my stem.

    They also have one thats the same but also measures cadence, just a little more expensive.

    Cheapest prices I've found have been on amazon
    Right on! Reviews looked good, so I ordered one. I'm only worried about one thing. I have Spinergy wheels, they have 4mm spokes, so, I'm not sure the magnet will fit.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  4. #4
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    MC Shawn, post an update once you have it installed. I'm also in the market for a bike computer and I'm running Spinergy Xyclones...
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by marpilli View Post
    MC Shawn, post an update once you have it installed. I'm also in the market for a bike computer and I'm running Spinergy Xyclones...
    I will do that.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  6. #6
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    I just got the Axiom IO from Perfomance. It was on sale for 29 bucks and it has temp and calorie counter.
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  7. #7
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    Good news!

    The Cat Eye CC-RD300W computer that I ordered showed up today. The magnet easily fits a Spinergy spoke. Computer steup and installation was pretty easy. It only takes about 15 minutes. Directions say to put it on the back of the right fork leg. I think I might change it to the front of the fork leg. So if it were ever to catch a spoke, the spoke would push it away from the wheel instead of into it. But, it takes long thin zip ties, so, I'll have to go buy some. I wish it could use wider zip ties to make it more stable. But at the same time, I can't say that it isn't stable. I didn't trim off the mounting bracket tab. It's not going to hit anything and leaving it long will allow me to easily take it off and on. I really like how you change the mode. You just push down the bottom of the unit and it pivots down a little bit and pushes the mode button, which is on the back. That way, you don't have to be accurate at pushing a button on the face of the unit. And with no button, dirt and stuff can't get into it. I'll take my new bike and computer out for a ride this afternoon after it cools off and report back. The second pic was taken looking through the wheel from the left to right side.

    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  8. #8
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    I took my Nickel out for its first ride today. I did 10 miles and the Cat Eye worked very well. My only complaint is that it is hard to see what mode you are in. And my eye sight is pretty good. But, you can pretty much tell what mode you are in by what type of # you are looking at. So, I would have to say, I am pretty happy with it. Thanks fuelman22 for the suggestion.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  9. #9
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    It's still working great.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  10. #10
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    Its a great little unit. My only complaint with mine is that my handlebar LED light interferes with it and it does not read when the light is on. My night rides dont accumulate any miles!
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  11. #11
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    Thinking about getting this same unit. People on amazon are raving over it!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    I took my Nickel out for its first ride today. I did 10 miles and the Cat Eye worked very well. My only complaint is that it is hard to see what mode you are in. And my eye sight is pretty good. But, you can pretty much tell what mode you are in by what type of # you are looking at. So, I would have to say, I am pretty happy with it. Thanks fuelman22 for the suggestion.
    No problem! Glad I could help.

    As for the placement on the fork I have mine angled so that if a spoke hits it it'll just push forward instead if getting jammed up. I'll try to take a pic of it later when I have time.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuelman22 View Post
    No problem! Glad I could help.

    As for the placement on the fork I have mine angled so that if a spoke hits it it'll just push forward instead if getting jammed up. I'll try to take a pic of it later when I have time.
    I was thinking abut doing that also.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  14. #14
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    Would it be safe to say that these units (compared to a gps unit) are more accurate with distance? I got one as a gift (Bontrager I believe) and still want to get a GPS for navigation among other things...but wonder if people use them together.
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  15. #15
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    Good info. I've been looking for a comp as well.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiznblue View Post
    Would it be safe to say that these units (compared to a gps unit) are more accurate with distance? I got one as a gift (Bontrager I believe) and still want to get a GPS for navigation among other things...but wonder if people use them together.
    GPS is very accurate. It's accuracy is not dependent on distance traveled. If a bike computer is off by, lets say, 100 feet/mile, in 10 miles it will be off 1000 feet.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  17. #17
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    I have been usng the Cateye Strada for a couple of years, but I'm now considering changing to a simple GPS unit like the Garmin Edge 200. Here's why...

    1. I've got three bikes with 700C, 26" and 29" wheels. Although you can toggle the Strada between two different wheel sizes, it doesn't have three! You also have to buy a 'second bike kit' which includes a sender unit, wheel magnet and computer mount for each bike, and of course Cateye charge only a little less than a whole new Strada for these Meanwhile, GPS units only need a new stem mount on each bike, and as they don't rely on wheel travel to measure distance, are more easily shared amongst different sized bikes.

    2. All the readings except time depend on an accurate wheel circumference measurement. Although you can measure this with a 'rollout', it still varies a bit ride to ride with terrain and tyre pressure, so GPS is more consistent and accurate.

    3. The ease of pressing the function button mentioned by another poster above can backfire if you accidentally touch the computer at any stage - which I seem to do regularly, like when I crash, lean on the bars to rest, lift bike over an obstruction etc, which results in resetting all the data mid-ride.

    Don't get me wrong - its a great little unit, and I've lived with the above minor frustrations for a couple of years, but have decided for me its time to move on to a GPS based unit...
    Last edited by PerthMTB; 11-10-2012 at 12:33 AM.

  18. #18
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    I was looking for a GPS, but have decided that anything that will give me accurate distances is out of the price range I'm willing to pay. I'm leaning toward the Cateye Strata Wireless because of this Thread, but I was curious if anyone had tried the Cateye Mini Wireless. How do the two compare?

  19. #19
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    GPS is subject to errors as well. GPS works by checking your position periodically, and calculating the distance between these points. Going around a curve, the GPS is going to treat it like several straight line segments rather than an actual arc, under-reporting the actual distance.

    Most units check your position once per second. A few check it five times per second, but if the Edge series did that I'm pretty sure they would mention it in the sales info.

    There are other sources of GPS errors, including things as fickle as atmosphere:
    Error analysis for the Global Positioning System - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  20. #20
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    Definitely. There's error inherent in whatever method you choose. A poorly calibrated cyclocomputer has the potential to have much worse accuracy than GPS, but it has the potential to have better accuracy if you meticulously calibrate it.

    Think of it this way:

    A basic cyclocomputer gets you the same basic information but does not give you data uploads to the computer or location information.

    GPS gives you the location information and the ability to load that data to your computer (some high end cyclocomputers without GPS give you upload capability without location information). Once you get the data onto the computer, different programs have the ability to analyze it in more advanced ways, especially if you add things like an altimeter, cadence sensor, heart rate monitor, power meter, or temperature sensor.

    You can see pretty quick that accuracy is not why people get a GPS for their bike.

  21. #21
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    Good post Nate. It won't let me give you more rep, but you deserve it

    Ok, ok, yes, I do want something . Question:

    I used my cell phone GPS, and went with a Cateye Strada for two reasons: 1. The phone (SiRF III chip) kept losing lock in the woods, and (2) convenience. The Cateye is as convenient as the speedo/odo in my car--it is just there and all I have to do is look at it. I use the odo to for maintenance, tracking chain & tire life, etc.

    Would a low-end GPS, say Edge 200, stay locked better than my cell phone, and 2, is it auto-on, etc -- as convenient to use as the Cateye. I would probably use Strava if I had a good GPS.

    Thanks.

  22. #22
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    Here is a photo of how I mounted my sensor.

    Also, I lost the head of the computer -- it just came off while riding. It is still in the woods AFAIK. So here is a simple fix for that problem.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike computer is the hardest part of my new build.-magnet-mounting.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images  

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