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  1. #1
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    Trance 3 '07 Poor handling - your thoughts please

    Hi,

    I'm no pro rider i'll admit, but i've had a series of scary moments on this bike ending with the grand finale last night of head butting a tree full on whilst the bike somersalted 20 foot down an embankment

    There appears to be no control over the front end. It's kinda hard to explain really. Its like when you turn into a corner the bike wants to keep going straight ahead if you know what i mean. Riding and cornering on loose gravel is very very scary.

    I cant figure what is causing it. Is it the Kenda Blue Groove tyres, the long stock stem or the rubbish Rockshox Tora forks or a combination of all three?

    Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated

    Thank

    Stu

  2. #2
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    Are you just switching over from a hardtail? How long have you been riding?

    I just swapped from a HT diamonback to a Trance X2 and it takes a while to learn a new bike. Part of my problem was I didn't realize how much faster I was really going on the new bike - the "gee I'm not bouncing of the seat so I must be going slow" mentality took a while to go away for me.

    I did notice I have to run lower air pressure in the front than I've been used to on my old bike too. I even swapped back to the same tires I was used to, but ended up dropping about 5psi to get the same well planted feel I was used to. Not sure if the geometry just makes the front want to push more, or if I was using more body lean on the old bike or what - but with the lower pressure and a couple weeks getting used to the new bike I feel just as nimble as I used to.

  3. #3
    Johny Sokko!
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    You are proabably jazzed about the new full suspension and riding faster and more agressive above your level. You can get a guy with skill, have him hop on that stock bike and rail the turn you went out of control on. Take your time, make sure the stem isn't too long. I ride with a 2.35" up front to help with more grip. You do have to learn the balance of the bike. Bottom line! Nothing wrong with bike.

  4. #4
    bi-winning
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    Try moving some of the spacers under your stem to on top of the stem.

    Consider adjusting (lowering) tire pressure.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all your advice !

    I've done away with the Kenda's and put Maxxis High Rollers 2.35's front and rear. Soft compound on the front and 60's on the rear. I'll run the front a bit lower and i'll see what it's like. I will also play around with the stem spacers.

    I have indeed swapped over from a hardtail and it is fair to say that i was probably riding the bike above my level ;-) I'll dial down the crazy next time me thinks

  6. #6
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    i prefer running a slightly shorter stem than standard practice in order to make it less twitchy up front. that might help, along with a lower front end.

    unless you're an avid climber who demands top times and a stretched out position (my back aches just thinking about it), if your stem is over 90mm, try one that's 20mm shorter than what you've got now and you'll be surprised how much better it handles.
    Support your local advocacy group: FVMBA!

  7. #7
    Bike Geek
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    bar

    I say try a wider bar, like the easton ea50, and maybe a fatter front tire
    RIP AL DAVIS

  8. #8
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcalruckus
    I say try a wider bar, like the easton ea50, and maybe a fatter front tire
    Although a wide bar may feel nice, if your trails are really narrow, a wider bar might not be a good idea.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  9. #9
    I AM I AM
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    I'd say it's the wheel base. Dual suspension bikes tend to have a longer wheelbase (and or chain stays) compared to say an XC hardtail, so that translates to slower handling around corners but at the same time it does make the bike more stable at higher speeds.

    I had an '06 Trance 3 and it certainly was harder to corner, compared to say a Gaint XC hardtail I have now or even the STP (stp isn't as nimble as the XC ht).
    To put my case in point...
    Wheel Base of...
    Small Alias 1042
    Small Trance (16") 1062
    STP (13.5") 1057

    So as you can see those numbers explain exactly why the trance was most sluggish around corners and the Alias is the most maneuverable.

    From my experience the only way to get around it (lol - get around the corners) is to try a few different cornering methods, such as shifting more weight towards the front wheel, then backing off after you're into the corner. I'm guessing a slightly shorter stem could help with the maneuverability?

    Tyres certainly do make a difference in the grip and therefore your confidence to maneuver the bike around those corners at speed!

  10. #10
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    .. turn up your rebound.

  11. #11
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    I have found that my Rockshox Tora 289 forks would only compress 20mm even with 86 kg acting down on them no matter what the preload adjuster was set at. I fully stripped them down yesterday and rebuilt them with 7.5wt fork oil instead of the 5 wt / 15 wt that Rockshox recommends and the travel is now excellent.
    I think that the fork was kinda acting like a rigid fork due to the fact that the bike had been stored unused for a year with the fork legs horizontal ? (my friend bought this bike but never used it, he kept it in a cupboard !!!)

    I'm gonna try the same jump next week, i'll report back next week if my hands still function

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