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  1. #1
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    rock shox sid xc set up on giant 2001 NRS 3

    Hey, I need help. I just got a new Giant NRS3 2001 on ebay. It was only $430 shipped which I thought that it was a great deal. It comes with a RS 2002 read SID XC and a Judy Air front. I am trying to adjust the rear shock. RS suggests about my weight on both chambers. I did that and it seemed very stiff. I want to have it very plush so it will stick to very rocky terrain on my long seated climbs. I like to do long rocky climbs seated without dabbing. I don't care about going fast, but that the bike tracks. I weight about 200 with clothes on.

    I only rode the bike a little on the street. It rode great. for a while I had it set up with very little air and would ride into the curve sitting to see if the rear would bottom out and it wouldn't. That's the reason I thought that filling it up would be too stiff.

    This is my first suspended experience.

    Thx,

    Andres

  2. #2
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    suspension 101

    first you need to be able to gauge how much travel you are using, the easiest way is to attach one zip tie to the fork stanchion and one to the shock tube so that when either compresses you can know the maximum point it compressed.

    second, there are no hard and fast rules as to how much pressure to use, just recommendations. if you feel like you want it a little softer, reset the air pressure lower in say 5 or 10 psi increments until you're good with it. remember not to let too much out tho so you're not bottoming out.

    usually, a good starting point is to use enough PSI in your shock and fork so that both ends compress about 25% under your "riding" body weight and tweak from there. best to have a friend help you gauge this either by pedaling around a bit and coasting up to a wall or other sturdy object and stopping in a "riding position" and having friend move both zip ties to the seals, then easing off the bike without bouncing it. when fully off the bike you can see how much the suspension compressed. beforehand it's also good to know how far your bottom-out is by letting out all the air in both and fully compressing the supension. sometimes the max length of the tube isn't where the travel stops.

    NOW, all that above being said, if i'm not mistaken, the NRS bikes were "recommended" to be set with no sag in the rear, so that means you'll want to start somewhere in the PSI range where there is no sag under your weight, then keep reducing til it begins to, then add a little back.

    remember, these are just basic starting points, making the most out of your rebound and compression adjustments (if you have them) is for a whole other post...

  3. #3
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    thanks

  4. #4
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    50 psi

    Giant recommends 50 PSI in the negative chamber of that shock on the NRS, regardless of weight. 50 in the negative, and your weight in the positive chamber, is a good starting point.
    RIP AL DAVIS

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcalruckus
    Giant recommends 50 PSI in the negative chamber of that shock on the NRS, regardless of weight. 50 in the negative, and your weight in the positive chamber, is a good starting point.
    This is my first experience with full suspension and I love it. I rode 3 hours yesterday and 3 today in rocky trails. It is very responsive and light compared to my previous bike. Since I don't intend to use it for jumping, I wanted to get as much suspension both front and rear. For the rear, I got it at 180 for the positive and 190 for the negative. I weigh a little over 190. For the front I had very little air and used the springs mostly. I never came close to bottoming it but got plenty of suspension to keep the bike tracking and get over bigger rocks and bumps. I am enjoying the hell out of it.

  6. #6
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    The negativce chamber needs 50 PSI. The positive chamber needs as much air as it needs that you have a "no-sag"-setting. This means that the bike compresses zero percent. Otherwise the NRS-System won't work.
    There are some people who recommand a 20%-Setting on a NRS but the NRS is constructed around a "no-sag"-setting.

    The bike will be fast but not too comfotable. If you look for a comfortable ride go for a different bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bummel42
    The negativce chamber needs 50 PSI. The positive chamber needs as much air as it needs that you have a "no-sag"-setting. This means that the bike compresses zero percent. Otherwise the NRS-System won't work.
    There are some people who recommand a 20%-Setting on a NRS but the NRS is constructed around a "no-sag"-setting.

    The bike will be fast but not too comfotable. If you look for a comfortable ride go for a different bike.
    You are probably right, but mine compresses and I like it. I don't know if the nrs system works or what it means. I like the way it rides with the active shock while being very responsive. I don't want the stiff rear end. I mostly seat when I climb. I got it because it was new and cheap and had pretty nice components. It so happens that it rides very nice with the suspension the way I set it even though it is supposed to be set differently.

    Since this is my first full suspension I cannot compare. Maybe there are others that would ride much nicer that I should have considered. But they were a lot more dough. I'll ride this one until I get tired and then I'll switch frames.

  8. #8
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    it doesn't matter whether you sit or you stand.
    while pedaling the NRS-Systems "decompresses" the shock.
    If you ride with no-sag the shock can't be decompressed. this is the reason why a XtC NRS does not bump.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bummel42
    it doesn't matter whether you sit or you stand.
    while pedaling the NRS-Systems "decompresses" the shock.
    If you ride with no-sag the shock can't be decompressed. this is the reason why a XtC NRS does not bump.
    Ok, today I took my shock pump to the trail I rode with 200 positive and 30 negative. It rode like a very responsive stiff hardtail. It gave me a bit of suspension over very rough stuff. But, my butt would jump up every time I went over a big rock. It was fast and maneuverable but required lots of concentration.

    Then I took 15 psi from the positive and pump the negative to 190, essentially giving me nice suspension. It lost some of the liveliness of course but it had a nice cushy feel and would get me over technical stuff a lot easier. I liked it soft better for the terrain of tons of rocky stuff. For smooth terrain I'd probably go with the psi recommended by giant. For El Paso desert trails, I'll stick with the softer rear. Even with the softer rear it is pretty responsive and maneuverable.

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