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  1. #1
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    Rear tire spins...

    I have a 2009 Trance X... Although I love the Trance been contemplating on replacing it due to one thing. Whenever I power up on climbs and get off the saddle the rear wheel just spins in place not enough traction. This is shifting my body forward slightly I don't know if its my technique that is causing this because as soon as I sit back on the saddle I get traction. I don't know maybe if its also my setup. I have a 140mm fork so I tend to shift forward to avoid lift on the front end during steep climbs.
    Anybody experience the same with their Trance?

  2. #2
    El Gorrrriiii
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    What size is your bike? Think of it like a car. If you have too much torque then you might need a bigger frame.

  3. #3
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Uh, what tire, what PSI are you running, and what are your trails like?

    No one can help you if you don't give us much info to go on.
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  4. #4
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    Maxxis Minion 2.35 52psi maybe too much? I live in Socal loose over hardpack rocky and sandy.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirthugger View Post
    I have a 2009 Trance X... Although I love the Trance been contemplating on replacing it due to one thing. Whenever I power up on climbs and get off the saddle the rear wheel just spins in place not enough traction. This is shifting my body forward slightly I don't know if its my technique that is causing this because as soon as I sit back on the saddle I get traction. I don't know maybe if its also my setup. I have a 140mm fork so I tend to shift forward to avoid lift on the front end during steep climbs.
    Anybody experience the same with their Trance?
    Yeah, that would be your technique. Nothing wrong with the bike, just the operator.

    I would drop your tire pressure to 35 psi.

  6. #6
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagaredama View Post
    Yeah, that would be your technique. Nothing wrong with the bike, just the operator.

    I would drop your tire pressure to 35 psi.
    What he said. 52psi in a 2.35 Minion is, uh, yeah, sorta' absurdly high.

    Try dropping your front and rear pressure to around 35psi. Yeah, it'll be slower going, but hey, you'll actually have some traction.
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  7. #7
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    ... and if we just ...

    52 PSI and you're having issues with traction and you want to get rid of the bike because of it, nothing to do with you or those pressures ROFLAMO Thanks for that Dude, absolutely needed that laugh

    Seriously, as the other 2 posters said WAY too high pressure unless you weigh like 400lbs. Try dropping the pressure down somewhere in the 30s and give that a try, if you get by without pinch flats or rim dings then lower it some more. Lowering a tyres pressure until you start to feel it squirm and then going up a couple PSI normally gains max traction, but it will roll slow on smooth pavement etc. FYI I weigh about 175-180lbs geared and normally run 2.25"-2.4" tyres between 19-22 on the front and 24-28 on the rear - no paper thin sidewalls mind you.



    Quote Originally Posted by Dirthugger View Post
    Maxxis Minion 2.35 52psi maybe too much? I live in Socal loose over hardpack rocky and sandy.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  8. #8
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    Finding your correct tire pressure is one of those things that requires trial and error and a little patience. If you invest the time and effort, you will be rewarded with a bike that rides much better. Not only will you improve traction on the climbs, you will also notice a significant improvement in the descending qualities of your bike. It really is crazy what a difference just a few psi can make.

    I agree with the other posters that you should lower your psi to 35. Personally, I would go no higher than that. I would start there and lower the pressure by a couple psi per ride until you notice the tires really hooking up with the trail. Eventually you will find a tire pressure that works for you and stick with that.

    If you start getting flat tires because of the lower pressure (pinch flats) you can do one of two things. Either increase your pressure so you don't get the pinch flats anymore, sacrificing traction. Or you can consider converting your rims to tubeless. Tubeless allows you to ride at lower pressures than using tubes and still avoid pinch flats (because there is no tube to pinch). Stans NoTubes makes a kit that is fairly easy to install and works really well with most rims.

    I am running tubeless and weigh 200lbs. I am running 28psi front and rear. It took a while to figure out and a bunch of tubes to convince me to go tubeless, but I'm glad I put in the effort because my bike is perfectly dialed in now. Just keep making small changes until your pressure feels right!

  9. #9
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    As everyone has said, your tire pressures are very high.I run the Minion DHF on my ReignX and have a few traction issues as well. Remember that the Minion is a downhill tire. Switching your rear to a tire with a more climbing friendly tread pattern could make a world of difference.

    Regarding tire pressure, check out this Tech Tuesday post from pinkbike.com. It is very informative and is guaranteed to help you out.

    Tech Tuesday - Find Your Tire Pressure Sweet Spot - Pinkbike.com

    Happy tuning and enjoy your ride.

  10. #10
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    Hey thanks for the suggestions, definitely too high I was laughing with you when I read that again . I used to run Kenda Nevs on it and that was the reason why I switched to Minions to see if I can cure it. Didn't realize I could have saved money just by lowering the pressure. I will def try it 35psi
    Thanks!!
    I really love the Trance or else I wouldn't even post this thread.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirthugger View Post
    Hey thanks for the suggestions, definitely too high I was laughing with you when I read that again . I used to run Kenda Nevs on it and that was the reason why I switched to Minions to see if I can cure it. Didn't realize I could have saved money just by lowering the pressure. I will def try it 35psi
    Thanks!!
    I really love the Trance or else I wouldn't even post this thread.
    Yeah... the problem with lowering the pressure on the Nevs is that you would then have decent traction but you'd get 4,231,239 pinchflats.

  12. #12
    El Gorrrriiii
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirthugger View Post
    Maxxis Minion 2.35 52psi maybe too much? I live in Socal loose over hardpack rocky and sandy.
    Umm yea way to much air...

  13. #13
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    Tire pressure is first thing, but your shock pressure and rebound speed can affect climbing traction also.

  14. #14
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    aside from the absurdly high tire pressure, you might work on climbing technique as well.

    shifting your weight forward on the front wheel = less weight on the rear wheel -> more likely to spin.

    when you are out of the saddle climbing, try to keep your arms straight and equally balanced on the wheels.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marshalolson View Post
    aside from the absurdly high tire pressure, you might work on climbing technique as well.

    shifting your weight forward on the front wheel = less weight on the rear wheel -> more likely to spin.

    when you are out of the saddle climbing, try to keep your arms straight and equally balanced on the wheels.
    I was thinking the same thing but didn't post this for some reason.
    Even with the "perfect" tire choice/pressure/suspension setup on your bike - the natural tendancy to move forward while standing up can still spin the rear tire.
    Get on a loose climb and experiment with on your balance, in and out of the saddle.

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