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  1. #1
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    Pivot bearings / service duration?

    I have a 2010 Reign 2 - currently going through it to prep for this season and wondering how often most people replace the pivot bearings?

    I have't even pulled my linkage apart yet to see how the bearings feel, but curious if some people out there replace or repack the bearings seasonally, every other year or merely on how they feel.

  2. #2
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    I recently picked up a used 09 Reign frame on eBay. I have no idea what sort of maintenance the bearings might have received over the years, but I'm guessing none. One by one, I cleaned the outside, popped off the seal, doused it with WD-40 and worked the bearings until clean. Most were gunky with little grease, but all but one cleaned up fine. After rinsing out the WD-40 with brake cleaner, I packed them full of thick grease, replaced the one bad one, and they seem to be working like a champ.

    Anytime you pop off those seals, you're likely to compromise the sealing qualities, so at some point it will make sense to replace them.

    If I were you, I'd go through them as I did and hopefully all or most of them are still serviceable. Once you get 'em cleaned out good, you'll be able to tell if they're still good or not. My one bad one wasn't visually obvious, but no amount of cleaning would allow it to turn freely. The others felt like new once they were cleaned/greased.

    AM.

  3. #3
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    I'm interested in this also. I recently took the rear shock off to tinker around and everything looked sound. How tight should you bolt the linkages? where should you apply grease when building everything back up?
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  4. #4
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    i just pulled my rear triangle off this afternoon. Most of the bearings feel notchy. I plan to pull the dust seal off of them to see if cleaning & re-packing them will help.

    Curious to see how easily they press out given the odd and hard-to-get-to seats.

  5. #5
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    The one I had to remove/replace did not come out very easily. I had to use a blind puller attachment on a slide hammer puller to remove it. Don't try to remove any bearings unless you're sure you're going to replace them. You don't need to remove any of them to access the seals and clean/grease.

    AM.

  6. #6
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    KG - After servicing the bearings for the pivot arms (the small triangular linkage that depresses the shock), I found them "notchy" once the linkage was all bolted back up. Someone in another thread mentioned that... that's just the way they are. I don't know if that's right, but my bearings seemed perfect before reassembly. All the other bearings moved smoothly after reassembly.

    AM.

  7. #7
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    I think I read something in the "show your Reign mods" thread about an aftermarket bushing and/or bearing mod to do to these? Sound familiar? I tried to buzz through it again and didn't see it...

  8. #8
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    Re: Pivot bearings / service duration?

    Enduro fork seals sells the needle bearings for the top eyelet on the giants. The bottom eyelet does bot use the bushings.
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  9. #9
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    If you ride in mud or wash your bike alot you should check them. You can replace them faster than cleaning and re-greasing.
    There is a link on how to swap them out plus make a press out of sockets and long bolt. Bearing kit is around $65.00.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SD853 View Post
    If you ride in mud or wash your bike alot you should check them. You can replace them faster than cleaning and re-greasing.
    There is a link on how to swap them out plus make a press out of sockets and long bolt. Bearing kit is around $65.00.
    What link?

    I've already pressed a few out with sockets...haven't fully committed myself to doing it yet, but probably will wrap it up tonight. Most of the bearings still feel pretty good but just trying to do a comprehensive service so I can justify keeping this bike another season.

  11. #11
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    If they're still good, there's little to be gained in replacing them. I would leave them in place, pop the outer seal out with a small utensil, clean it out with WD-40 or similar, pack it full of grease, pop the seal back on.... and you'll be done in no time AND still have the $65 in your pocket and no unnecessary wear on the aluminum bores into which the bearings are pressed.

    AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post
    If they're still good, there's little to be gained in replacing them. I would leave them in place, pop the outer seal out with a small utensil, clean it out with WD-40 or similar, pack it full of grease, pop the seal back on.... and you'll be done in no time AND still have the $65 in your pocket and no unnecessary wear on the aluminum bores into which the bearings are pressed.

    AM.
    +1 Ive done this a couple of times with my '09 Trance, lots of miles and still going strong. In fact some of mine had little if any grease in them from the factory.

    The bearing mod referred to may be the needle bearing for the upper shock mount from RWC. ABOUT RWC SHOCK EYE NEEDLE BEARING KITS I did this too, and despite the hype that it will transform the bike from a chevy to a ferrari I didnt notice any difference on the trail. With the same psi in the shock I did notice the sag increased though, assumed it was due to less friction...no doubt that's a plus.

  13. #13
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    I wonder if less friction would result in a plusher ride?
    I have a '12 trance that I have been debating doing this.

    Since you are familiar with the maestro. I see the bearings in the linkages are pressed in there. So would I just pop off that outer disc whiles its in there or do I need to pull the whole thing out?

    I thought if you pop that outer disc it bends/warps and will never go back in properly?
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kikoraa View Post
    I wonder if less friction would result in a plusher ride?
    I have a '12 trance that I have been debating doing this.

    Since you are familiar with the maestro. I see the bearings in the linkages are pressed in there. So would I just pop off that outer disc whiles its in there or do I need to pull the whole thing out?

    I thought if you pop that outer disc it bends/warps and will never go back in properly?
    That is exactly what I read over and over when deciding to make the purchase... less friction = better ride. And that makes perfect sense, im just saying for me personally I didnt notice any difference on the trail. Maybe because the Maestro feels so plush to me anyway. Still a good upgrade though, I dont regret it. The stock bushing will eventually wear, properly serviced that bearing will last a long long time.

    I'm sure you could bend the seals if you are heavy handed. If you do happen to bend it a little you can straighten it easily enough with your fingers. Just work slowly and lift it a little at a time.

    The bigger issue IMO is trashing the edge of the seal when prying them out. You need something thin. I use a dulled razor blade, the thin box cutter style. I dulled it a bit with a file so it wouldnt slice up the seal and used the corner to gently pry them up. A thin jewelers screwdriver might work too. Just take your time and pretend its surgery... None of mine show signs of grease getting out or dirt/water getting in.

  15. #15
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    Ill have to try that when I have some time. I took apart the maestro to replace the shock, ended up being to harsh, so took it apart again to send it off and get adjusted. put it back together again and feels great. Its just SO DAMN TEDIOUS putting linkages back together! Ill probably order the RWC bearings and work on the seals the same day I put them in to kill 2 birds
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

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