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Thread: Old Giant Yukon

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    Old Giant Yukon

    I recently picked up an old Giant Yukon (I'm guessing early 90's since it's a ridgid frame?) It was really cheap and it's in great shape. I used to Mountain bike when I was younger but haven't in years. I recently moved and theirs a mountain with a TON of bike trails close by. What are some things I can do to this Old Yukon to make it more trail worthy? Is it even a decent bike for trail riding? I will mainly use it to bike with the dog and ride some trails here and there, what do you think? I've been out of the game for a while so things like tire suggestions etc...

    Crappy pictures I know but it's all I have right now I will post more later.




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    No suggestions? No one knows anything about these old Yukons?

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    I had a 1995 model and that one looks a year or two newer. What I did to mine was made it a 1x7 since the front shifter was broken, put better tires and brakes on it. New chain and shift cables along with brake cables. I also put a suspension fork on it that I had laying around along with new stem, grips, and handlebar. Very nice ride..a size to small (it was a L and I needed an XL) I sold it for $125 and really wish I didn't. It was a great bike.
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    I've got a 1997 model, and I think yours is maybe a year or two older. Let me split the difference with SRASS, and let's call it a '96 (though I would have guess older).

    They're a great, honest old-school bike.

    I bought mine new and it was my first mountain bike. Rode plenty of rough trails on it. It was a lot more forgiving on bigger bag tyres - I think I wound up running 2.35 eventually - than on the original 1.9s.

    Mine's still in service as a commuter bike. With slicks and no squish at either end it's even reasonably quick. I rode it in a short-course triathlon a couple of weeks back!

    Apart from suspension, the biggest limitation I found with the bike for off-road use was the brakes. They are woeful. And when they're wet, they're worse than woeful.

    So, if I was pressing mine back into service, I'd be going back to the fattest tyres I could fit, and replacing the wire pull brakes (not sure what the correct term for those is. No, it isn't "*****e") with some cantilevers.

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    I plan on putting on some new tires, maybe 2.1's and maybe a front suspension fork. Then probably the brakes like you said. I want it to still have road manners but be able to do some light trails. Any suggestions on a fork or tires?

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    Nice find! I've got a 2008 Yukon and like it better than my newer more expensive bikes.
    Last edited by S_Trek; 04-11-2011 at 01:41 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTguy
    I plan on putting on some new tires, maybe 2.1's and maybe a front suspension fork. Then probably the brakes like you said. I want it to still have road manners but be able to do some light trails. Any suggestions on a fork or tires?
    I think the trouble you'll have with trying to fit a suspension fork is that the head tube/steerer tube is a much narrower diameter than on any current bikes. Can't remember what the actual figure is, but your LBS will be able to tell you.

    That means that finding a suspension fork that fits is going to be a real challenge. I would guess you'd need to find a fork from the same era to be able to fit it, which in turn means you're buying a 15 yo suspension fork - limited travel, in need of overhaul, limited access to parts. So I'd query whether going down that route is going to be more of an exercise in frustration than anything else.

    I could be wrong, and maybe your LBS could source something for you that will work.

    I found Maxxis High Rollers were a good tyre on that bike. Not light, but big bags and loads of grip. With no suspension and the brakes needing all the help they could get, I think they're a better choice than something lighter and smaller bagged.

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    Just re-read your post. High Rollers aren't a great choice for road manners!

    I think I also ran some Hutchison Pythons or Barracudas (can't remember which) at one point and they were probably a better compromise between road and light trail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodpuddle
    I think the trouble you'll have with trying to fit a suspension fork is that the head tube/steerer tube is a much narrower diameter than on any current bikes. Can't remember what the actual figure is, but your LBS will be able to tell you.

    That means that finding a suspension fork that fits is going to be a real challenge. I would guess you'd need to find a fork from the same era to be able to fit it, which in turn means you're buying a 15 yo suspension fork - limited travel, in need of overhaul, limited access to parts. So I'd query whether going down that route is going to be more of an exercise in frustration than anything else.

    I could be wrong, and maybe your LBS could source something for you that will work.

    I found Maxxis High Rollers were a good tyre on that bike. Not light, but big bags and loads of grip. With no suspension and the brakes needing all the help they could get, I think they're a better choice than something lighter and smaller bagged.
    Good point on the fork I didn't think of that. I'm playing around with a few ideas but I got it riding really nice today. I took off the terrible center pull brakes, replaced them with shimano v-brakes I got at the LBS, replaced the broken shifters and brake levers and ran all new cables/housing for brakes and derailleur and oiled the chain and cassette. Also replaced the rear tire. I just took it for a test drive and it runs great on the road. That was the first step, get it shifting and riding good. Now I need to clean it up a bit, maybe take off the hill climber bar ends and get some new grips. Or maybe just new bars and headset altogether.




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    Nice. Enjoy the ride. Those bikes have a great feel IMO - maybe it's the steel, or maybe it's having to really pick your lines carefully and not rely on the hardware to soak up the rough. Very satisfying.

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    This was the 1995 Yukon I had (Also owned a 2010 and my current singlespeed rig is a 2009 Yukon). Don't worry the bar ends were not run at that angle Really wish i didn't sell it..

    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
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    I agree that you should abandon the idea of buying a suspended fork. Save that money and, if you decide you want to get something to smooth out the trails a bit, buy a newer bike.

    In the mean time, you should consider getting a higher volume front tire (2.2, 2.25 etc) with less aggressive tread. The WTB Woverine 2.25 is a nice high volume time with less aggressive tread that rides fine on the road, only problem is I'm not sure how durable ut would be on the road. Keep looking around and I'll be you can find something that fits the bill.

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    I just got a 95 Yukon as payment for some work I'm doing on a neighbors kids bikes. Needs a tube in the rear tire, and the shifters need fixed, but I think it'll make a good bike to ride with the kids around town, and on some beginner trails. I tire of swapping my eggbeaters for flats when I ride with the kids.
    I already swapped a decent seat onto it, and yanked the bar-ends off. Now need to get new grips, but am waiting to make sure the shifters are OK.

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    I donīt know why but I definitely prefer the straight handlebars to the riser type. I have a 07 yukon and have already swapped over my handlebars from my old bike that are lighter but would prefer to have a new straight bar anyway. Also am looking forward to getting rid of my bar ends. Read recently about their dangers so will be getting rid of them!

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