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  1. #1
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    Anthem1 Shock settings (Manitou S type)

    Just got my Anthem 1 and am a little confused on setting up the Manitou S type rear shock.
    Here’s what the manual said:
    Put 75 psi in the SPV (red) valve
    Put enough Air in the main chamber(black) to achieve ¼ of the travel in sag
    Then put in 30-70% of rider weight into the SPV valve(red)

    I weigh 180 LBS
    To get the right sag I put in 125 PSI in the main chamber(black)
    Then I put in 130 psi(70% of 180) in the SPV valve(red)

    This was a little soft, probably could use more in the main Chamber but pretty close.

    Anyway, I get the February edition of MTN Bike Action last night and here is how they show setting up the shock in their review:

    Body weight plus 10% to set the shocks spring pressure, they call this the “red” valve, which I thought was the SPV setting (Is this a typo?).
    Then Pressurize the SPV chamber(the black Valve??? Another typo?) to adjust your pedaling platform to suit( they used 75 psi)

    As you can see, if I went by MBA’s settings I would be running 198 PSI in the red valve and somewhere around 100 psi in the black valve. This is way different than the way the manual has it. Any advice on whats the correct way?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I recently got an anthem 1 also... I set up the rear shock per the manual's directions and found that it was pretty soft. I added a bit more pressure to the red valve - I think close to 150 and it seems better. I weigh about 180lbs.
    I too would like to hear other comments...

  3. #3
    Cycle Solutions
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    The red valve is almost certainly the SPV, as that is it's trademark colour (yes colour with a "u" I am Canadian). The recommended 75psi is likely a neutral point for the SPV valve where it has little effect on the suspension. This allows you to put the correct amount of air in the main chamber (black) by letting the shock sag. Once this is achieved, pump up the SPV to the required responsiveness. If the shock is bottoming out (the only way to tell if you dont have enough air, use the travel O-ring to see if you are bottoming out) then add more air. If she is bobbing under pedaling (which it shouldnt really from what I hear regardless of your SPV setting) that I'd say add more air to the SPV. Note: Only adding air to the main chamber will be an effective way to keep the shock from bottoming out, do not rely on the SPV for this. SPV is designed only to control what activates the initial travel stroke.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies. The typo in MBA is what really had me messed up. I think I have a handle on what’s going on now. Setting up the shock per the provided instructions creates a plush ride. That’s fine if that’s what you’re after but not what I bought this bike for. I set the shock up like MBA has it in their review (correcting for the typo of course). And have found, for me, it is the ticket and exactly what I was hoping this bike would be; an efficient pedaling machine with just enough rear suspension to take the edge off. Anyway, here’s what I arrived at for my settings:
    My weight 180

    Main chamber (black valve) 190 psi
    Spv chamber (red) 130 psi

    I’m sure I’ll tinker with it some more but for now that seems to give a super firm ride under pedaling force but the suspension is active when it needs to be. If I’m just out noodling around with the girl friend I can take the main chamber all the way down to about 125 for a super plush ride. I do get quite a bit of pedal induced bob at this low a pressure. Pump it up to body weight (or just a tad more) and this thing is rock solid.

  5. #5
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    Make sure it still has the correct amount of sag. The geometry of the bike depends on it.........jacking up the air pressure might run the shock topped out and leave you with a steeper head angle which will in turn make your front fork less effective and the handling too twitchy.

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