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  1. #1
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
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    Anthem suspension set-up help?

    I just picked up my new 2009 race bike. Anthem X2, soon to be modded out to lighten it up, and provide some better grip in the turns.

    However, first and foremost, I need some help with the suspension setup. It came from the shop with 130psi in the rear shock. This felt soft, and despite my weight, I put out a large amount of power, so I had some significant pedal bob. Similarly, I came very close to bottoming the shock out (or so the little rubber band on the shock told me) on a test run. Out came the trusty pump, and I bumped it up to 160psi. Better, but not perfect. I'm only 143lbs at the moment, and am not doing DH runs, either. I'd prefer it to be a bit stiffer but also plush.

    So, I'm told that there are adjustable compression settings on the RP2. Call me blind, but I can't find any way to adjust how "firm" the shock is aside from the ProPedal switch and air pressure. This is my first experience with rear suspension, so pardon my entry level questions.

    Can anyone help me firm up the suspension?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Le Duke; 04-27-2009 at 11:42 AM.

  2. #2
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    The only way to adjust compression damping on an RP2 is to get internal changes made by a company like PUSH. From what I've heard there are different versions of the RP2 that have different pro-pedal firmness setting (indicated by the three stripe symbol on the air sleeve), depending on what the manufacturer decided was the best match to the frame. To answer your question, you are not blind, there is no button/dial. Try to find the air pressure that makes the shock bob as little as possible while still providing a plush ride (always a compromise, but there definitely is a sweet spot) Under very hard efforts (sprinting/climbing) you might still see a bit of bobbing, and thats when you should enable the pro-pedal. If this is insufficient to adjust the suspension behaviour to your liking, you might need to think about getting an rp23, but I've never found the need for one on the anthem.

  3. #3
    I want to ride
    Reputation: pd406's Avatar
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    I own the Anthem X2 as well.

    Mine is a size large frame and the compression is set in the middle (so says the line on the sticker on the shock). I weigh in at 160 lbs and I found this number to also be a good psi for the shock. Although I also feel at times that this could go a little higher. For now it will stay at 160 psi. Hope this is helpful. By the way, what psi are you running on the fork?

  4. #4
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    Just got me an Anthem X3 frameset and built it up nicely. You want to use this as a guide: http://www.giant-bicycles.com/backof...de20070609.pdf
    There are no compression settings on the RP2 shock, only rebound/propedal on&off/air spring pressure. Do not go by shock pressure since this could be off. Use the sag measurement and in the case of the anthem x, 15-25% of shock travel which is between 5.7-9.5mm is the sag range. Since you want a stiffer pedaling platform, i would set it to the lowest range which is around 5.7mm or you can just go down a little bit further to 5.5mm. Keep in mind that you will get a little bob no matter what from any rear suspension platform, that's just the nature of the beast and if you didn't want any bob at all then you might as well ride a hardtail. If it still is too much for you then place the shock in propedal mode, this supposedly will decrease rider induced bob but then you will negate some of the maestro suspension. Good luck!

  5. #5
    little mad riding hood
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    Make sure your rebound is also setup correctly on BOTH ends . BF and I own a new pair of Anthems, his is an X0, mine's an X2. Caveat: we are both primarily roadie and XC racers and are suspension n00bs. He's never even owned a duallie and I only had my Trance for six months and didn't learn much in that period except that the Trance was a beast to pedal uphill.

    Despite the diff in our rear shocks, we've both discovered that incorrect rebound can really affect how the overall supension balance on the Maestro platform "feels". Too fast and the damn thing wants to shoot you over the handlebars at every opportunity. Too slow and it feels like you're towing a 50 lb keg of twine that's gotten wrapped around the rear axle.

    Speeding up the rebound does seem to stiffen up the pedalling platform a bit, but (see above) don't over do it or the bike will ride like a '70s pogostick. I double concur with checking the sag and not going by the psi. We both had to fine tune the air pressure in the shock despite that he has the higher end RP23. He's 145# and I'm 130#, and I don't recall what we settled on for psi in the rear, mainly because he basically adjusted it by the seat of his pants on the side of a muddy trail.

    We both settled on a moderate rebound setting (5 clicks away from "fastest) - his was set too slow from the factory and mine was all the way up. Now that we've gotten them properly adjusted they both go like violated primates uphill and descend like guided missiles. I've been at the mercy of several different DS platforms over the past six months (demoing, borrowing, etc...) and for my money NOTHING rides like the maestro suspensions (even the Trance was a joy to ride, just not to pedal) but you've got to get them fiddled right.

    I'm sure there are way more knowledgeable folks out there who can give you better info, but in our experience we found the key was to find the right rebound on both forks and shocks to balance out the whole suspension platform (front AND rear).

  6. #6
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    Very good points on the rebound adjustment. Keep in mind that generally, a heavier rider will want more rebound dampening (clockwise on red dial). Perform the curb test in the suspension guide until you get it right.

  7. #7
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    I have the RP23 and weight 175, I am using 150 psi while bombing some very technical type trails (drops, g-outs, roots, etc and am using all of the available travel but not to the point of dropping the travel indication band off the shock sleeve.

  8. #8
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    anymore set ups guys, keep em coming

  9. #9
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    'propedal' *IS* in all reality, just a fancy name for a compression damping adjustment.

    the RP2 is a simple 2-way less/more adjustment, and you should be able to tell a slight difference just riding it around a parking lot.

    the RP23 just has a little more range of adjustment.

    to the OP: you really want to set the sag front and rear first, then go from there... the 'sag' is the amount the suspension compresses under your body weight.

    when a bike is set up with some 'sag' this allows the wheel a small amount of travel to extend when the bike becomes unweighted over rough terrain, keeping your tire more in contact with the ground. tire on the ground is faster than tire in the air. (and 'rebound' affects extension force)

    a typical 'starter setup' is to go with 25% sag, meaning with you on the bike in your normal riding position, the suspension is compressed 25%.

    the recommendations mentioned above are merely starting points/personal preference, some run less/some more,

    typically on a short travel XC race bike like the anthem most would run less sag, meaning if you have an air shock, use a higher pressure, or if you had a coil spring shock, you would turn the preload collar or install a higher rate spring.

    also, regardless of any companies marketing hype, the only way to fully eliminate 'pedal-bob' is to ride no suspension.

    'putting out power' is going to cause your suspension to move no matter what. it's the idea that the power transmitted from the chainring to the rear cog causes your suspension to compress is what's been addressed with multi-link suspension designes as well as 'pro pedal' or 'stable platform' shock/fork valving.

    hope this helps!

  10. #10
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    The Giant Maestro Suspension Guide 2010 recommends for the Anthem X:
    20 - 30% SAG (from shock travel 38mm) = 8 - 11mm SAG

  11. #11
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    I've got an Anthem X with an RP23.
    I weigh about #200 with all the camelback, etc on. I run my shock at #170, middle setting on propedal. Rebound is 3 clicks from fast. Full open feels very plush to me.

    Again, personal setting. Company SAG settings feel too soft to me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anthem suspension set-up help?-_bar3153-600-x-399-fast.jpg  

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