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  1. #1
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    Anthem: 80 or 100 mm or travel?

    So I recently bought a 2007 anthem 1, which came with a fox f80rl. I still had a 2008 fox f100 rlc lying around so I swapped out the forks. I did this because my weakest point is navigating technical descents quickly and some other people (notably adam craig himself http://www.bike-zone.com/tech/2007/p...g_giant_anthem) mentioned that this may be of some benefit in technical terrain. However, I did not notice that with the standard 110 mm stem the steering seemed a bit slow, so now im trying to decide between dropping the fork an inch (Im pretty sure the f100's can be dropped if you have the proper spacer) and just putting on a shorter stem. Also, could it be that its all in my head? Does it actually make a difference? So my question is, for those who have ridden an anthem in both configurations, what do you like better? Do you find the bike too twitchy at 80, or too slow at 100? Is the 'magical' handling ruined by the extra inch of suspension as mentioned in one of the reviews? Im not looking for general statements about how the change in AC length changes geometry etc., but for first hand accounts

  2. #2
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    80 vs 100mm

    beereppc I built a medium 2007 Anthem w a Fox 100 x teralogic fork.It seemed a bit lazy so I used a 10mm spacer to make it a 90mm travel fork.I run a 120mm 5 degree rise and no spacers.This worked out good for me.Not to twitchy but still carves well .When I say no spacers I removed the cool tapered carbon one that comes with the Giant and run the stem on top of the head set.Good Luck

  3. #3
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    I swapped mine to 100mm and then had both ends pushed. The bike feels great and the extra 20mm up front does not make the front end wallow or feel lazy. The techy stuff feels the same with the 100mm and the bike does feel like both ends are working together a lot better. I know this is due to the push treatment. As its better at the small bumps and the rear doesn't blow thru its travel anymore, even with the rec'd 5-8mm sag.

  4. #4
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    So I decided to just try it and lower my fork (fox f100rlc) to 80 mm. I also put the original (longer) stem back on because I figured it would make it feel a bit more stable. With the longer stem the bike seemed to steer about as fast as with the shorter stem at 100 mm travel. However, i found myself to stretched out so I switched back to the shorter stem. I like the way it rides and feels much more at 80 mm. Imight try to go back to 100 mm just to see if its not all in my head, but I dont think so.

    Pros:
    -Suspension feels more balanced
    -Climbs even better, less wandering of the front wheel, no popping up
    -Corners better, felt like I was able to take more speed through corners
    -increased 'flickability'

    Cons:
    -Obviously less travel, noticeable on fast techy downhills. At 100 mm I adopted more of a point and shoot type downhill riding, whereas at 80 I have to pick my lines more carefully. I actually enjoy this especially because the bike is so maneuverable
    -Weight is more distributed to the front, I had my rear wheel spin out and slide a couple times because I did not have enough weight on it. This is more of a question of getting used to the new setup though
    -Feels like I would go otb quicker, although it hasnt happened yet
    -Less forgiving, need to concentrate on riding more, I think I would crash quicker when tired at 80 mm

    Conclusion:
    If you want your anthem to feel a bit more like a trailbike, 100 mm is not a bad idea at all since it mellows out the steering a bit. If you want the bike to feel as fast as it can be and race it often 80 mm is more appropriate

  5. #5
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    Another option is run the 100 mm fork and go with a slightly shorter stem and/or bars. The shorter stem quickens the steering just a touch, while keeping the extra travel.

    Personally, I wouldn't go back to an 80 mm fork on my Anthem. Your mileage may vary.

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