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  1. #1
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    2009 AnthemX rear pressure

    What's a good guide that I can follow or start with, with my AnthemX's rear shock pressure? I previously had the 2007 Anthem where I ran my rear shock at 120psi (race) or 100 psi (comfort). At 120psi on the AnthemX, it feels too soft for me. Or is it just right that I feel this?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrusKO
    What's a good guide that I can follow or start with, with my AnthemX's rear shock pressure? I previously had the 2007 Anthem where I ran my rear shock at 120psi (race) or 100 psi (comfort). At 120psi on the AnthemX, it feels too soft for me. Or is it just right that I feel this?
    If you think it feels too soft, then it probably is. Is there an O-ring on the shock? If so, push it up the shock body so that it's flush with the air sleeve. Sit on the bike without over-compressing the shock, dismount and measure the distance from the bottom of the air sleeve to the O-ring. Change the air pressure until that distance measures 9.5mm, which is approx 25% sag. Adjust the air pressure from there in small increments to suit your preference.

  3. #3
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    how much do you weigh?
    2008 XL Giant Anthem Advanced Frame for sale (excelent condition) Make me a offer

  4. #4
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    I'm 160lbs.

    By the way, would you know how much total travel the rear shock has and it's measurement eye to eye?

    When setting up sag, do I put the propedal to + or -? Or it won't matter?

  5. #5
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    Shock dimensions: 6.5x1.5" (~165x38mm).

    Normally, you would set sag with propedal off, but I suppose if your primary concern was how the bike felt with the propedal on, then why not try setting the sag that way? If you were racing on a smooth track, you might want to run the entire race with the propedal on. Setting a lower pressure may make the suspension a bit more active, with the propedal helping to reduce out-of-the-saddle bob. The best way to know if that will work is through experimentation. When my bike arrives, I'll let you know how it goes for me.

    RP23 or RP2?

    I suppose the biggest concern would be that the shock may bottom out too easily with the pro-pedal off if you set the sag that way. It may even do that with the propedal on; I'm not sure how the Float's high speed compression damping would be effected. I have an RP2 on a Trek Remedy on which I could test that idea, but that's certainly not the best bike to compare with the Anthem X.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrusKO
    I'm 160lbs.

    By the way, would you know how much total travel the rear shock has and it's measurement eye to eye?

    When setting up sag, do I put the propedal to + or -? Or it won't matter?

  6. #6
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    I have the RP2 (Anthem X2) slapped in. With the PP on, I tried pumping it to 120psi in order for me to get that 25% sag... maybe a little bit less.

    I had an Anthem 2007 so I'm not sure now how to go about this rear suspension setting. My previous frame had a grid where you can refer to air settings according to your weight and ride preference. Aside from the fact that the present Anthem doesn't have this, the instruction manual that came with it is garbage.

  7. #7
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    160lbs and 120psi? I'm 155lbs and I'm running around 170lbs on my anthemx. Gives me around 15-20% sag. I like a very stiff and out of the way unless there is a hard hit rear suspension though, so your setup may vary from mine. I do wish the rp2 had a firmer propedal setting. I had the rp3 on my old trance revalved to make it firmer and I am missing that shock on this new bike.

  8. #8
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    True- I wish the propedal was firmer. I just tried 170psi on my shock. Taking it for a spin later...

  9. #9
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    poor old Giant, they spend millions and millions on research into the Maestro suspension and here are people saying it needs pro-pedal ! lol, and not only that, it needs to be firmer ! lol . I am racing a Anthem X this season and never even touch the pro-pedal, it ruins the ride, makes it harsh and ride more like any other full sus bike with a less sophisticated suspension design. i also don't worry about what pressure to set the shock, i set it via the sag, around 5-7mm.

    Obviously everyone can set the bike how they like, but it seems criminal to use pro-pedal on such a great system, i can't believe any gains you get from using pro-pedal (i.e. reducing any possible in-efficiency in pedaling?) out way the harshness in the ride !

    Switch the pro-pedal off, enjoy that Maestro goodness ;o).

  10. #10
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    My friend on a Stumpy FSR HAS to run Pro Pedal to get up technical climbs. His wife has a Trance X2 (actually a 2008 Cypher) abs she get up all the same hills just as fast with her RP2 wide open.

  11. #11
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    I also had an 07 1st Gen Anthem, I go about 175 and used that # for psi in my 07 RP2 equipped Anthem. I am now on a 09 Anthem X with an RP23 and find anything over 150 psi too hard. I agree completely with the pro pedal statements, it's just not needed on the Anthem.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalpower7
    poor old Giant, they spend millions and millions on research into the Maestro suspension and here are people saying it needs pro-pedal !
    No one here said anything about PP being a necessity. 743power said, "I like ..." He's clearly stating his preference, not an absolute. Even Adam Craig uses it:

    "The lack of a proper singletrack on the start loop meant I got to ride the first climb with Ryan Trebon instead of him crashing out in the first few minutes We had figured out that Ryan would need at least a minute gap over the top to keep me from running over (under?) him on the descent I decided not to find out and had a small gap on him as we crested. ProPedal off and time to roost things."

    Anyway, to the OP, I think at this point you just need to carry a shock pump with you and try out different pressures with and without PP to find what suits you.

  13. #13
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    I think it goes without saying if you are riding tarmac or anything completely flat you might as well turn pro-pedal on (i still don't bother though), for the same reason you might as well be on a hard tail, or engage lockout if you have it. It just seems such a shame to use it off-road, Maestro is just so good it does not need it. I used to race a spark, that needs pro-pedal, but does not have it, its like riding a bowl of custard compared to the anthem !, bouncing and flexing all over the place lol.If Fox did a lighter shock without pro-pedal at all i would happily do without it completely.

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    We kind of got off subject here, althogh I have to agree with everything said. I would like to hear more input about your weight and shock pressure. I just came off of a specialized and I wish Giant published a starting pressure like Spec. does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomBouch
    We kind of got off subject here, althogh I have to agree with everything said. I would like to hear more input about your weight and shock pressure. I just came off of a specialized and I wish Giant published a starting pressure like Spec. does.
    Giant gives a sag figure. There is no need to anything else. Just pump it up or let air out until you get the recommended sag. Thats the start point. If you want a firmer feel add air to reduce sag and if you want a more plush feel lower the pressure and increse the sag.

    The pressure figure is meaningless as pumps can be off by 10 PSI or more depending on the brand, age and treatment of the pump. None of the pumps we use are calibrated and certified to be accurate in any way. The gauge is just a relative measurement for you to use with your pump on your bike.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by formulaone33
    Giant gives a sag figure. There is no need to anything else. Just pump it up or let air out until you get the recommended sag. Thats the start point. If you want a firmer feel add air to reduce sag and if you want a more plush feel lower the pressure and increse the sag.

    The pressure figure is meaningless as pumps can be off by 10 PSI or more depending on the brand, age and treatment of the pump. None of the pumps we use are calibrated and certified to be accurate in any way. The gauge is just a relative measurement for you to use with your pump on your bike.
    I 100% agree here, what is the interest with the pressure ???, its not relevant !, use the sag setting, all giant would do is provide a estimated pressure to get the correct sag, as formulaone mentioned, shock pumps are not great for accuracy and a new shock will offer more friction that a nicely warn in one. Why are you not confident to use the sag, would you really just pump it to a specified pressure and leave it at that ?, regardless of how it felt or rode ?

  17. #17
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    Sag is a great starting point, but at the end of a ride I want to check my travel indicators and see what I used and what I left (wasted ) in reserve. Using the sag method on my Sid the first time out I bottomed out the fork. Use sag as a starting point and tweak from there.

  18. #18
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    For most bikes you can just put a zip tie on the shock and adjust pressure until you use all of you travel. This is not so easy with the Maestro suspension. Sag is very critical. The Maestro suspension uses the axle path (chain growth) for anit-bob rather than compression damping. The axle path only has the correct chain growth at roughly around the correct sag. If you run it with too much or too little sag it will affect your pedaling performance.

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