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  1. #1
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    New question here. 1st thing to replace on my stock NRS

    I just picked up a brand spankin' new NRS from Performance on clearance for just under $1k. it's just the NRS (the red one).

    Just curious what you guys think i should replace (if anything at all) on it. I'd be using it for some XC racing and adventure racing. Maybe a 24 race...if I train enough.

    I ride primarily cyclocross bikes, so I know very little about mtn. bike specific stuff.

    I'm definitely going to replace the tires and handlebar (way too wide for me).
    I'm guessing I should replace the Hayes Sole disc brakes...any suggestion on what to replace it with?
    Is it worth the $ to replace the wheelset?

    Basically, I'm looking for the best bang for your buck to improve anything either performance-wise or weight-wise. Or...just ride it as stock until things start to falter?

    any and all thoughts are appreciated!

    thanks!

  2. #2
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    Personally, I ride hard till something breaks then upgrade whatever breaks. ie.: my Deore broke and I got SRAM X7 and am awating that eagerly.

    I would recommend against replacing the tires if they are Hutchinson Python Airlights. Those are the best tires for XC in a lot of people's minds. Including mine. They are very light yet tready tires meant specifically for XC. The handelbar I also wouldnt replace. If you plan on doing 24 hour events, perhaps. Otherwise I would stray from that idea seeing has how it compliments the bike's geoemetry very much.

    From what I can tell those brakes will suit you if you dont plan on doing too much fading or downhill. Perhaps HFX-9s or Juicy 7s will do you a little better though. For you however I would recommend getting the Manitou RSEVEN fork. Its definitely an XC built fork, with nothing else in mind. Essentially a no compromise fork. And maybe the new Manitou in the rear as well to compliment it. The RSEVEN will take the edge of those long epic rides you seem intent on doing.

    Oh and... what is the wheelset? If its the Mavic like on other former NRS models I believe it will suit you fine. The NRS is built for XC so theres not much you can or even would want to upgrade to make it better for its purpose.

    However, if your a weight weenie im not the guy to talk to, but I did read that the RSEVEN was fairly light.

    All in all, just ride till things break but maybe look at a new fork and rear shock (air both ways... its the only way to go in your style of riding). Good luck and welcome to the world of NRS ownership!
    One of my friends recently died of a coke overdose and it really got me thinking, "damn, maybe I should start drinking pepsi"

  3. #3
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    Great Info on the bike!!

    hey en are es,

    thanks for the info. it helps a lot cause i know very little about mtn. bike stuff.

    the reason why i was going to change the handlebars was because they just feel so ridiculously wide for me. i'm use to 44cm drop bars, and the stock bars on the NRS feel like they are 3 feet wide to me. but...if it screws up everything by switching out the bars, i'll have to reconsider. the tires are the python lights...and i'll give them a shot now (not like i have anything to replace them with handy anyways).

    the reason why i brought up switching out the brakes is because of the single piston vs. the double piston of other models. from what i've read, the double piston is much more reliable. granted, i won't be doing anything crazy on the bike, so it's probably not necessary.

    i will have to look into potentially replacing the fork. if it takes of a pound or so, i'd be interested in doing it (stock is a Duke SL). otherwise, i'm coming over from a rigid cyclocross bike so this is like riding a cadillac to me. actually, i think it's too springy.

    but, like you, i'm fine with riding parts until they brake. i'm just curious if there were any parts/items you guys know i should replace OR upgrade to make this a "better" ride.

    i do love it though! went out for my first ride on it this past weekend at the local trail and it was CRAZY fun! i hopped back on my cross bike yesterday for basically the same ride, and man...no wonder i have no kids.

    thanks for the input, and i'm still open to any other comments as well!

  4. #4
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    I have a NRS Team with the following components:

    FSA Orbit ZR Headset
    Fox F100X Forks
    Race Face Dues XC Stem
    Easton Monkeylite EC90 lo rise bars
    Easton EC90 Zero carbon seat post
    Shimano XT crankset
    Shimano XT Front Mech
    SRAM X.0 Rear Mech
    SRAM Hollow-pin chain
    SRAM X.0 Shifters
    Magura Marta SL Disc Brakes
    Mavic Crossmax SL wheelset
    Shimano M959 SPDs
    XTR Gear Cables and Outers
    Fox Float Rear Shock
    Conti Tyres

    Upgraded my bushings to MAX bearings on all pivot points (you should already have bearings there if you run an NRS that is '04-'05.)

    Rides fantastic, and i would say any of the above listed would be a fantastic addition to an NRS.

  5. #5
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    Smidge that sounds like a very nice setup. Got any pics? Hows she ride... whats the weight? Must be a rocket...
    One of my friends recently died of a coke overdose and it really got me thinking, "damn, maybe I should start drinking pepsi"

  6. #6
    enjoy the view
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    check out some of the souped up specs and mostly pics in the "nrs pics post",
    i'm hoping that you might get some pointers from there. enjoy your nrs mate!

  7. #7
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    Perfect Christmas List for me!

    Thanks for the spec lists.
    Those are definite upgrades I'll be looking into.

    I'll probably look into brakes 1st since folks keep telling me to go to a dual piston brake vs. the single piston of the Sole.

    I can't wait to take it for a long ride during Thanksgiving. So looking forward to it!

  8. #8
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    Havent weighed it yet - it's very light though :P

    Only just managed to get it finished last week so havent really ridden it amazingly hard yet, but she is sweet as.

  9. #9
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    Smidge I am so jealous of you and your bike. Some day... off in the future... I hope to own this years NRSc1 frame and have so much planned for it.

    NEthingbutlast, what all have you decided on? Most stuff is universal, but if you ride mostly on rocks, gravel, dirt, grass... it could affect some stuff. Personally im going for a plusher fork soon because its all rocks here. Hutchinso Python Airlights are really an "anything XC" tread design if you ask me but some still claim otherwise.
    One of my friends recently died of a coke overdose and it really got me thinking, "damn, maybe I should start drinking pepsi"

  10. #10
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    :P it's cost me about $6970 tho. I'm in the UK and that works out about £4000 which is a lot of money for an XC rig.

    *Stuff is so much more expensive here :-/

  11. #11
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    stickin' w/what i got...for now.

    well...i think i'm going to just stay stock for now.

    whatever brakes first, or gives me the most problems, i'll change out.
    i am going to go with a narrower handlebar because i just feel awkward biking around like i'm ready to hug someone.

    i do have a good list to pull from when parts are needed now though!

    thanks again for all the input

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEthingbutlast
    well...i think i'm going to just stay stock for now.

    whatever brakes first, or gives me the most problems, i'll change out.
    i am going to go with a narrower handlebar because i just feel awkward biking around like i'm ready to hug someone.

    i do have a good list to pull from when parts are needed now though!

    thanks again for all the input
    Perhaps you could consider cutting the handlebars. they are aluminum, so i don't believe that is a problem. an inch or two off of each end may help.

    I do agree though that the bars that come stock are wider than needed.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  13. #13
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    buy some super cheap flat bars and a couple different stems (supergo = $5 stems!) to try different set up's. keep the riser because you may find the wider bar gives you more confidence and stability. try moving the controls more inline as well, figure the extra wide spec is to accomodate antlers. once you figure out what setup suits you best, then go for the high zoot crap (or the hacksaw).

    nice bike, the performance here has the same for about a k and with their frequent sales, can get another 20% off... about 800 for a nice bike with good specs. and people on the classifieds post ads wanting the same dollars or more for their used, dented bikes!

    about disc brakes... anyone really need them? maybe ski lift downhillers and such, but man, they are overkill... not to mention the price. and weight. hairball's words on going downhill: never touch the brakes. if he never used his brakes, what's the point of expensive and heavy super stoppers? if you have vbrake studs (and your levers are cable pull), try a set. performance brakes can be had for 10 bucks a set, $35 out the door for front/rear vbrakes, levers and new cable. easy to setup and maintain, no issues with grit binding caliper pistons, light weight...

  14. #14
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    There are a few things good about disc brakes.

    Stopping power is generally stronger than V-brakes. They often do not lock up and skid either.
    If its raining or muddy out, or your goint through deep sand like I do, V-brakes will scratch your rims or if muddy wont brake as well. Disc brakes can stop through most everything, including water, mud and sand without problems.

    Weight is an issue but for some people like me, if you have the choice and money, its fine. I personally am fond of disc brakes over V-brakes.

    Oh and if your going to cut the handlebar, make sure to be precise and careful... dont want anything uneven.
    One of my friends recently died of a coke overdose and it really got me thinking, "damn, maybe I should start drinking pepsi"

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by en are es
    There are a few things good about disc brakes.

    Stopping power is generally stronger than V-brakes. They often do not lock up and skid either.
    If its raining or muddy out, or your goint through deep sand like I do, V-brakes will scratch your rims or if muddy wont brake as well. Disc brakes can stop through most everything, including water, mud and sand without problems.

    Weight is an issue but for some people like me, if you have the choice and money, its fine. I personally am fond of disc brakes over V-brakes.

    Oh and if your going to cut the handlebar, make sure to be precise and careful... dont want anything uneven.
    i dont remember ever feeling the need for more braking power, even with old cantilever/u-brakes. linear brakes were definately an improvement over cantilevers, i think. it's been so long since using canti's. could have been better setup, better levers.

    as far as riding in wet/muddy/sandy; i think your tires are going to be the limiting factor rather than the brakes.

  16. #16
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    I just dont like going 25 down a trail, then having to take a sudden turn without a bank or anything, you cant exactly bullet through that. You could but its a lot easier to brake a little bit, and disc brakes should enable me to get closer to the turn before I brake. I never really brake much to begin with though, but every now and then we have a downhill section that is basically a u-turn overlooking a cliff.

    Tires limiting braking power? I see where your coming from, but rims and V-brakes make a big difference. If your biking through a puddle about 4" deep, then your V-brakes are going to not brake well until you get all the water off your rims. Disc brakes can stay dry under 4" of water, and even if they are wet, ive found them to brake better. Maybe its just me...

    On second thought disc brakes may be more a personal preference than something everyone will need or even want for that matter.
    One of my friends recently died of a coke overdose and it really got me thinking, "damn, maybe I should start drinking pepsi"

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