Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: telemike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    238

    XC - I mean real cross country

    The other day I was riding some fire roads in truly a toasted area. The burn opened many areas of overgrown fire roads. It also burned vast areas of meadow, forest, serpentine, etc (about 70,000 acres). Having ridden the fire roads, I couldn't resist following some game trails in the burned over meadows and riding cross country back to the mine road. The land was very cracked as usual in this terrain, fire roads and all, but was fun to ride.

    How many other folks ride some real cross country?

    Is is legal? Would I do anything else? Would I ask first?

    PS: Personally, I would only think of this in little used land. I have no desire to despoil the landscape.

  2. #2
    Gumnut Peddler
    Reputation: Grinderz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    564
    I think some people refer to this a 'trail blazing' and others refer to it as 'exploration'. Each to their own I guess.

    I have wandered around some well used game trails before on the bike. Ended up down at a little creek that I never knew existed. Was a nice little trip out, but I was also going a slow meandering pace.

    I think there is a time and place for it, and as long as you are not hacking away at shrubs/smashing over trees/etc then I think there is nothing wrong with a little 'exploration' every now and then.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    538
    This is something that I did as a kid in Arkansas. I would just ride my bicycle or motorcycle all over the place. As long as I wasn't messing anything up my neighbors or the land owners didn't care. I was able to find creeks ponds and clear water swimming all over central AR. I wish I could still do this, but here in TX there is a different attitude to "exploration". If your not bothering anyone or the regrowth then have at it.

    Needless to say I am slightly envious.
    "Your opinion may vary, but it's stupid." -Rich Dillen

  4. #4
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,479
    You are fortunate to have that kind of space to ride in.
    We used to be able to explore like that even in-town as long as we sorta stayed out of sight (and out of mind) - there were networks of small trails connecting the parks and back lots and neighborhoods for miles. But out "in the country" we covered a lot of game trails, pipe lines, power lines, dry creeks...
    Those days are long gone, though, now that everything is developed. I can't believe where they are building houses and strip malls... land that never would have otherwise been built on. Acres of fill dirt. Re-routed streams. bleh.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Le Pirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul.C View Post
    This is something that I did as a kid in Arkansas. I would just ride my bicycle or motorcycle all over the place. As long as I wasn't messing anything up my neighbors or the land owners didn't care. I was able to find creeks ponds and clear water swimming all over central AR. I wish I could still do this, but here in TX there is a different attitude to "exploration". If your not bothering anyone or the regrowth then have at it.

    Needless to say I am slightly envious.
    Yep.

    Here in Texas, "explorer" is pronounced "tres-pass-errr", and make good practice targets

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4
    I've done some exploring and accidentally made some unwanted boar friends. Gotta be careful.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,239
    Quote Originally Posted by telemike View Post
    The other day I was riding some fire roads in truly a toasted area. The burn opened many areas of overgrown fire roads. It also burned vast areas of meadow, forest, serpentine, etc (about 70,000 acres). Having ridden the fire roads, I couldn't resist following some game trails in the burned over meadows and riding cross country back to the mine road. The land was very cracked as usual in this terrain, fire roads and all, but was fun to ride.

    How many other folks ride some real cross country?

    Is is legal? Would I do anything else? Would I ask first?

    PS: Personally, I would only think of this in little used land. I have no desire to despoil the landscape.
    We have done a fair amount of that...We have alot of crown land.

    Around here it is legal depends where but even in a motorized vehicle it can be legal...

    But for sure on non motorized it is legal...

    You can not cut down trees, or break the knap of the forest floor....

    You can move deadfall, rocks, etc.....if a path is formed by multiple users it is most often let stand.

  8. #8
    Stiff yet compliant
    Reputation: Moustache rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,902
    Legality depends entirely on what type of land you were on.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    3,120
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Pirate View Post
    Yep.

    Here in Texas, "explorer" is pronounced "tres-pass-errr", and make good practice targets
    But you guys don't believe in public lands; out west we do!

    To the OP: if you're on national forest or BLM land, then you're golden.

  10. #10
    Tool
    Reputation: Pedalphile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,978
    Here in NH we do something similar when it gets cold and doesn't snow - rivers, lakes, reservoirs - all make for great studded tire explorations with no trail necessary. Incidentally, rolling on ice is one of the colder rides you will encounter since the speed to effort ratio is quite high (much like road riding in the cold).

    There's too much undergrowth and deadwood here to really do any off-trail exploring. Any off-trail adventures are usually referred to as bushwhacking, and it isn't much fun on foot, let alone on a bike.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Le Pirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    But you guys don't believe in public lands; out west we do!

    To the OP: if you're on national forest or BLM land, then you're golden.
    Oh, I believe in public lands 100%...however, yes, you are correct. I've grown up in TX and love it...but I wish we had public land like you guys do. I hate fences

  12. #12
    PRETENDURO
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,731
    Quote Originally Posted by Grinderz View Post
    I think some people refer to this a 'trail blazing' and others refer to it as 'exploration'. Each to their own I guess.
    There is also a term referred to as “poaching”.
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given Brewtality too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  13. #13
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,797
    Quote Originally Posted by Moustache rider View Post
    Legality depends entirely on what type of land you were on.
    Yup. Everyone will interpret that sort of thing differently.

    Around here, it's not even much of an option because of the thick underbrush and frequent downfalls. Super soft forest duff in the places that are open makes it even harder. You also had better be ready to soak up lots of thorns on your body.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MrAitchGee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    206
    I quite often go 'exploring' , there doesn't even have to be any trail, just riding across the hills and riding the best route over whatever terrain you come across, i've found myself walking for several miles across boggy terrain with my bike on my shoulder because of this type of mountain biking, appart from the unexpected chance of long walks I love this kind of bking. if you can do it, do it.

    In Scotland we don't have tresspass laws like in England but in recent years we have introduced the countryside code of conduct, basically common sense involving farm animals, wild animals and the land etc, something i've practiced since i was a kid before there even was an official code of conduct.

    I've never upset anyone yet
    I scurry away with my hardtail between my legs

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •