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  1. #1
    nimble biker
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    sugoi short sell over 100 bucks

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    Sugoi is one of the pricier brands ,you can find good shorts in 50 to 70$ range.

  3. #3
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    Well, one reason mountain bike shorts are fairly expensive is that you are essentially buying two garments: a liner and a short.

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    Niche market.

  5. #5
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    I buy the ones at Target. Cost $10- sometimes $5.

  6. #6
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    They've always been expensive. I think I paid about $100 for a pair of Castelli bibs 30 years ago,

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    I paid £35 for a pair of £80 Sombrio shorts, they're great quality and they have a liner but when you compare them to some of the top quality hiking shorts from Karrimor etc it's hard to see where the extra cost is. Beware of prestige pricing...

    Prestige Pricing: Definition from Answers.com

  8. #8
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Everything is more expensive.... The hitch rack I paid $395 for a couple of years ago is now over $500. On the high end shorts front- I really like Endura's for technical/rocky riding. I bought one pair with a $50 off certificate I won in a bike race... can't bring myself to pay full price for them.
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    There are many roadies in my town. They tend to clump together in their housing decisions, so I find a house full or roadies and do a bib collection, getting 7 or so pairs. While the colors are crazy, I ride in fancy shorts I would never want to pay full price for. Many of the shorts are close to new. I'm due for another collection in the next year or so, will be the third time in about 7 years. Fortunately the market for used shorts is thin, so they'll usually give me the shorts for free, and I'll just tip whoever brings them by my house. I guess it's not for everyone though...fortunately, or it wouldn't be free.

  10. #10
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    Try Voler.

    I find their shorts are reasonable and you can get a very good pair for around $60. However, these are not baggies so if you are afraid of lycra, look elsewhere. Another plus in my book is that the product is made in California in case a USA made product is something that might interest you. I still have not worn out the two pair of Voler shorts I used regularly.

  11. #11
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    I ride Lycra on the road and have a collection of old, fading and worn out ones. I ride baggies off road: For me personally they don't get hung up on my saddle like Lycra does; not to mention I'm a slave to fashion.

    Totally agree that new baggies with padded chamois liners are over the top expensive. My solution is to wear the worn out Lycra shorts for the chamois underneath $15 OP board shorts from Wally World.

    As far as road, you need really good pads for long rides. I have scored 3 pairs of new Hincapie bibs on eBay for $65/ea this spring. Should last me a good 3-4 years. They fit and feel great.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  12. #12
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    Chainlove has shorts on sale all the time. At 50%-75% off the price goes from ridiculous to reasonable.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev Bubba View Post
    I find their shorts are reasonable and you can get a very good pair for around $60. However, these are not baggies so if you are afraid of lycra, look elsewhere. Another plus in my book is that the product is made in California in case a USA made product is something that might interest you. I still have not worn out the two pair of Voler shorts I used regularly.
    Second that on Voler, great company to deal with and a nice price range of lyrca to choose from.

  14. #14
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    Competitive Cyclist has 21% off apparel & accessories through tomorrow 5/26 with promo code GIRO21.

    (I'm not affiliated with them.)

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    Adjusted for inflation I don't think they are any more expensive now than what they were when I bought my first pair 13 years ago. There might be more expensive options, but comparing apples to apples, I don't think much has changed.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post

    sugoi short sell over 100 bucks

    Not all of them, I have two pairs (lycra and baggies, and there were both close to $100 but not over.

    Totally worth it, IMO. It's mostly due to the chamois, but the general construction is really good as well. I have yet to buy a pair of shorts for under $50 that I was really satisfied with on a long ride.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  17. #17
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    Re: why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Its because of the world chamois shortage, didn't you hear? Surveyors declared 'peak chamois production' in 2008, and since then, Chinese chamois mines have been drying up.

    If geologists can't find new reserves or invent new exploration techniques, the world will be out of chamois in 2025, while demand from cyclists continues to increase. PM me to invest in my chamois hedge fund, its a sure thing!

  18. #18
    nimble biker
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    I managed to pay for a nice short from MEC for $70 bucks. woohoo.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddprocter View Post
    Its because of the world chamois shortage, didn't you hear? Surveyors declared 'peak chamois production' in 2008, and since then, Chinese chamois mines have been drying up.

    If geologists can't find new reserves or invent new exploration techniques, the world will be out of chamois in 2025, while demand from cyclists continues to increase. PM me to invest in my chamois hedge fund, its a sure thing!
    You obviously haven't heard of the chamois recycling programs being implemented as we speak by the big bike short factories. They send employees disguised as homeless cyclists into thrift stores and buy all the shorts they can, rip out the old chamois'es and send them to the factories for re-use. Word on the street is they plan to charge more for the recycled ones.
    Don't let it get you down, but there's a good chance you were an accident.

  20. #20
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    Shorts and preferably bibs are one place to not be a tight ass.

  21. #21
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    Re: why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    I just ride with compression shorts under board shorts. Seems to work fine for me. Wont pay $70+ for a pair of shorts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GelatiCruiser View Post
    I just ride with compression shorts under board shorts. Seems to work fine for me. Wont pay $70+ for a pair of shorts.


    You very well may change your mind if you ever use a quality pair of shorts or bibs.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty $anchez View Post
    You very well may change your mind if you ever use a quality pair of shorts or bibs.
    Yep. It took me two years of regular riding before I tried a pair of real biking shorts, and I could have slapped myself for not doing it sooner.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    Shorts and preferably bibs are one place to not be a tight ass.
    But you look better if your ass is tight.

    Seriously though, I couldn't agree more. I learned a long time ago that when you buy quality stuff, you never miss the money after the purchase. If you buy cheap stuff, every time you use it you wish you had something better, you usually end up buying something better, and in the end usually end up spending more than if you had just bought something good to start with.
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  25. #25
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    There's a difference between a 30 dollar shorts and a hundred dollar ones. If you don't mind showing off your butt crack, go for the cheaper ones as they are really thin. Only thing that pisses me off about the expensive ones is lycra is still lycra..one small snag and you might as well toss them out. They were my favorite pair too.

    I just have a couple of chamois liners and wear them under my regular shorts now. They shouldn't cost so much but it's supply and demand.

  26. #26
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Bike shorts (and clothing in general) are expensive because people get their collective panties in a bunch when textile factories in Bangladesh collapse. When the hand wringers among us demand higher wages and better working conditions for third world countries, it's going to make consumer goods, like clothing, cost a whole lot more.


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  27. #27
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    Bike shorts (and clothing in general) are expensive because people get their collective panties in a bunch when textile factories in Bangladesh collapse. When the hand wringers among us demand higher wages and better working conditions for third world countries, it's going to make consumer goods, like clothing, cost a whole lot more.


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    Last edited by dwt; 05-27-2013 at 02:50 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Adjusted for inflation I don't think they are any more expensive now than what they were when I bought my first pair 13 years ago. There might be more expensive options, but comparing apples to apples, I don't think much has changed.

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    I just wrap a binbag around my groin.

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    It is inflation. Real inflation is supposed to be something like 9% a year now. Peoples wages just aren't going up with prices. I don't know why, but that's the way it is.

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    Oh, and Kucharik's has 6 panel bibs for like $45.

  32. #32
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    Good chamois is good chamois.
    I'm afraid of heights so a 26'r fits me to a T.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Yep. It took me two years of regular riding before I tried a pair of real biking shorts, and I could have slapped myself for not doing it sooner.
    Look, ....probably 80% of the cyclists in the entire world ride a bike to get from point A to point B, in regular clothing and on flat pedals.

    Unless you're actually "racing", where even minute differences can make or break you in a race, i think it's nuts to spring for such things. The advertizer's sure can drain the dough from some folks.

    The plain cotten Levi shorts i've chosen to wear (bought at the thrift stores usually),for years have worked fine for commutes up to between 25 to 50 miles.

    I haven't done much over that, don't have a need or desire to at this point. Most of my commutes are between 8 to 10 miles a day,....even in the winter where i switch to Levi style pants, or the LL Bean lined with fleece jeans. (super for cold weather!)

    With a pair of cotten briefs on under, and riding a well broken in Brooks B17 saddles,......i'm comfy and don't look like a cycling nerd walking into a Mall or food joint. (or hobbling in on clip on shoes)

    I doubt i'll ever clip in either,....i'm 57 now and run just a 1987 era Shimano PD-M730 mountain bike wide flat pedal on 5 of my main bikes. In all that time, even running fixed gear at times, i've NEVER slipped and injured myself!

    Simply put, i don't need or want all that cycling specific cr*p!

    .......and can spend my dough on what i DO want and "need". (older US made titanium frames, and nicer but older componants at reasonable prices)

  34. #34
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Well. It's for more than just racers. Most of us ride bikes for longer distances and get sweatier than just our commute to work or to pick up a loaf of bread. A good pair of shorts is the only way to go unless you want to sit on a steak.

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    ^ and how do you like your steak, rare?

  36. #36
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Yes, of course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    Well. It's for more than just racers. Most of us ride bikes for longer distances and get sweatier than just our commute to work or to pick up a loaf of bread. A good pair of shorts is the only way to go unless you want to sit on a steak.
    "Sit on a steak" LMAO!

    Seriously,....around here where i live i regularly see clipped in and full kitted riders who i KNOW are just riding 10-20 miles a day to and from work. One guy works at a Burger King, and has to change both ways on arriving and again when leaving.

    So unnecessary for that milage, but OK,....to avoid the steak in the shorts syndrome with LONG mileage involved, get all dandied up.

  38. #38
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    So what? Good for the kid for riding to his job at Burger King.

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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    So what? Good for the kid for riding to his job at Burger King.
    LOL,...the "kid" is like 45 years old and lived within 6 miles of work. But he does go out early for a 20 miler or so to get in shape.

    In my mind still not enough to go through all the hassle.

  40. #40
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    Quote Originally Posted by joejeweler View Post
    LOL,...the "kid" is like 45 years old.
    And....

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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    And....
    I already gave you my "and" ...........

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by joejeweler View Post
    Look, ....probably 80% of the cyclists in the entire world ride a bike to get from point A to point B, in regular clothing and on flat pedals.

    Unless you're actually "racing", where even minute differences can make or break you in a race, i think it's nuts to spring for such things. The advertizer's sure can drain the dough from some folks.

    The plain cotten Levi shorts i've chosen to wear (bought at the thrift stores usually),for years have worked fine for commutes up to between 25 to 50 miles.

    I haven't done much over that, don't have a need or desire to at this point. Most of my commutes are between 8 to 10 miles a day,....even in the winter where i switch to Levi style pants, or the LL Bean lined with fleece jeans. (super for cold weather!)

    With a pair of cotten briefs on under, and riding a well broken in Brooks B17 saddles,......i'm comfy and don't look like a cycling nerd walking into a Mall or food joint. (or hobbling in on clip on shoes)

    I doubt i'll ever clip in either,....i'm 57 now and run just a 1987 era Shimano PD-M730 mountain bike wide flat pedal on 5 of my main bikes. In all that time, even running fixed gear at times, i've NEVER slipped and injured myself!

    Simply put, i don't need or want all that cycling specific cr*p!

    .......and can spend my dough on what i DO want and "need". (older US made titanium frames, and nicer but older componants at reasonable prices)
    Suite yourself. You won't miss what you don't know.

    FWIW, I don't bother with cycling shorts for a 10 mile errand-ride either.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Sugoi is one of the pricier brands ,you can find good shorts in 50 to 70$ range.
    Sugoi makes the Neo Pro $50 and the RPM for $75. The Evolutions at $90 are probably the best bang/buck tho. I'm partial to the RS at $130 for long, hot road rides but in the dirt I'll run pretty much whatever as long as the holes aren't in the wrong places.

    I've tried other brands but end up back at Sugoi. No brand loyalty, just how it is for me; YButtMV ...

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Suite yourself. You won't miss what you don't know.

    FWIW, I don't bother with cycling shorts for a 10 mile errand-ride either.
    You sound a little more balanced at least. Bet you still clip in though???

    Seriously, i don't miss want i don't want either. For sure i have better things to spend money on than cycling specific clothing, which is overpriced considering most i've seen are made overseas.

    And i don't miss not being clipped in either. The longtime owner of one of the local bikeshops had just recently begun to clip in himself, and was sort of pushing the idea on me. But he got along fine too for all of his almost 60 years without it! He'd probably still be using platforms, but how do you "sell" the public on such things when you don't use it yourself?

    With how i ride and the distances involved, don't fix it if it ain't broke. More money going down into the cycling abiss pushed by the advertizers.

    While pros might benefit/need these things considering the distances involved, i prefer to ride on a whim when i want to in what i'm wearing at the time and not have to dress up for the prom.

    Like i said,....probably 80% of the world's riders who aren't racing ride in regular cloths and platform pedals. Been that way over 100 years.

    By the way,.....here's a funny one for all you "clip joint" supporters., off the link below. Ben had a coming out, of sorts. (or shorts)

    Can't happen with my securely belted on jeans or shorts. I carry my wallet ON my belt (custom made leather that snaps shut and holds credit cards and cash), as well as my cell phone on other side. Cycling shorts don't have belt loops as i recall.

    Lovely Bicycle!: We All Fall Down?

    BenJune 25, 2011 at 4:39 AM
    When I got my first clipless pedals, I was told that everyone falls once. Once is enough, evidently, but everyone has to fall once in order to learn.

    I rode for a couple of weeks and racked up a couple of hundred kilometers and I thought I had the hang of it and that I'd gotten away with not falling. Then I slowed down at a stop sign without unclipping and thought I saw it was clear and was about to proceed when a car came into view. I hit the brakes and started teetering and went into a dramatic slow-motion struggle with my bike as I panicked and forgot how to unclip. In this struggle, I stood on my pedals and managed to hook the horn of my saddle on my cycling tights, which pulled my tights down, exposing my bare ass to the world.

    Then I fell. I fell properly, apparently. I didn't stick my hand out to break my fall, which could have ended in a broken hand or arm or separated shoulder. I contacted the street with my meaty parts -- my thigh and my shoulder.

    As I lay there with my shoes still clipped into my pedals and my bare left buttock in contact with the road, a helpful couple across the street shouted out, "are you okay?" I fell over myself assuring them that I was fine, and that they shouldn't come over to check on me.

    Sure, it's humiliating, but it hurts less than you think. And your fall will probably be a lot less humiliating than mine was.

    I've put well over 10,000 km on my bike and I've never fallen a second time. That lesson is learned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joejeweler View Post
    You sound a little more balanced at least. Blah blah blah blah blah....
    Who cares? Sometimes I ride with chamois, sometimes not. I'm almost always more comfortable when I wear chamois. Especially when my rides go over 2 hours. Guess what, I've done a couple rides in excess of 6 hours this year. And it's even more comfortable for short rides, though my "don't bother" cutoff tends to be about 5 miles. The costs of changing shorts outweigh the benefits of the increased comfort below 5mi or so.

    And guess what? I have some cheap chamois and some expensive chamois. The expensive chamois is more comfortable than the cheap chamois. Wow. Mind. Blown. Your retro grouch rants aren't going to change that, and neither will the marketing departments of any companies that make the shorts.

    What irks me is that it's so hard to find a pair of baggies that fit well and are durable. Part of the problem is that so few bike shops around here carry a selection of baggies worth trying on. I might get ONE option at each shop, but frequently those options overlap between shops. And the apparel buyers seem to be clueless. I will pay for good clothes, but all too often baggies are either too loose and snag on stuff or they have a bad cut and are too tight in critical locations and restrict movement. I've been wearing the same pair of baggies for 8 years for this reason. Finding chamois that fits is easy and I have several pairs.

  46. #46
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    I don't clip in riding around town, that's for sure. I do clip in for longer road rides and mtb, though.

    You make a good point about most people not riding in "cycling" clothing. However, I think that has more to do with the fact that worldwide, most people cycle simply as a way to get around (something I wish more folks did here in the US). Go to Copenhagen and you see the streets clogged with riders, all in street clothes. But then look at the folks who get more seriously into mtb or long road riding, and you will see more cycling specific stuff.

    I think this goes to something I see as a little unfortunate with our biking culture here in the us, whether it be on pavement or dirt: people take it all a little too seriously. Being passionate about pushing limits and getting in shape is fine, except that it means that we tend not to just get on a bike in flip-flops, jeans and t-shirt and ride across town to do our business. Everything always needs to be "extreme", or "training", or a competition. All those things are fine, but I feel like a lot of joy gets lost thinking that you need to be really serious about the "sport" to be a "cyclist". It's like, if there is no adrenaline involved, what's the point?

    One of my greatest joys on a bike is just tooling around a city (usually New York) on a comfortable bike in street clothes.

    However, keep in mind this is an MTB site. And for most of us, intense riding (whether it be up, down, or both) is at least part of the passion. And when you look at a road biking site, it's the same thing. And when that is what you are doing, things like a chamois make a difference in my experience.

    I've tried a Brooks saddle. My issue was more to do with it just being too big for technical riding. I can see it being great for my commuter for around-town tolling when I don't bother with a chamois. Some might be true of my longer road rides (I see loads of guys spend long days on those with no chamois), but I already have the chamois, so I don't really see the point.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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    @ NateHawk

    If you're going to quote someone on a forum, it's really lame to add into said quote something that was NOT said by the person being quoted.

    Add your "....Bla bla bla bla bla...." if you will, but for sure don't attribute such moronic sentiments to me.

    Thank you.


    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I don't clip in riding around town, that's for sure. I do clip in for longer road rides and mtb, though.

    You make a good point about most people not riding in "cycling" clothing. However, I think that has more to do with the fact that worldwide, most people cycle simply as a way to get around (something I wish more folks did here in the US). Go to Copenhagen and you see the streets clogged with riders, all in street clothes. But then look at the folks who get more seriously into mtb or long road riding, and you will see more cycling specific stuff.

    I think this goes to something I see as a little unfortunate with our biking culture here in the us, whether it be on pavement or dirt: people take it all a little too seriously. Being passionate about pushing limits and getting in shape is fine, except that it means that we tend not to just get on a bike in flip-flops, jeans and t-shirt and ride across town to do our business. Everything always needs to be "extreme", or "training", or a competition. All those things are fine, but I feel like a lot of joy gets lost thinking that you need to be really serious about the "sport" to be a "cyclist". It's like, if there is no adrenaline involved, what's the point?

    One of my greatest joys on a bike is just tooling around a city (usually New York) on a comfortable bike in street clothes.

    However, keep in mind this is an MTB site. And for most of us, intense riding (whether it be up, down, or both) is at least part of the passion. And when you look at a road biking site, it's the same thing. And when that is what you are doing, things like a chamois make a difference in my experience.

    I've tried a Brooks saddle. My issue was more to do with it just being too big for technical riding. I can see it being great for my commuter for around-town tolling when I don't bother with a chamois. Some might be true of my longer road rides (I see loads of guys spend long days on those with no chamois), but I already have the chamois, so I don't really see the point.
    Some good points also, and i suppose as most of my riding involves mostly shooting around town, i will admit i have a more limited need than some of the other riders.

    BTW,....Brooks does make much thinner/smaller saddles than the B17 i prefer. The Brooks "Swallow" and a few others are much thinner and more suitable for racing. Once you get up around 175 lbs,.....they just don't work as well for some of us. The last thing i want, though, is "fanny-floss"!

    The link below shows some of that line:

    BROOKS ENGLAND LTD. | SADDLES | ROAD+&+MTB

  48. #48
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joejeweler View Post
    @ NateHawk

    If you're going to quote someone on a forum, it's really lame to add into said quote something that was NOT said by the person being quoted.

    Add your "....Bla bla bla bla bla...." if you will, but for sure don't attribute such moronic sentiments to me.

    Thank you.
    I was summarizing, because that's what it sounded like to me.

  49. #49
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    I've looked at the narrower Brooks. Still too wide for my MTB needs. I like to run a pretty narrow saddle. Easier to move around.

    Plus, I don't want to have to worry about a Brooks on my MTB. Real leather has not held up long term on my mtb saddles.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    why are bike shorts becoming so expensive?

    You think shorts are expensive try buying them for a Clyde
    Chances are .. You're full of !$@&?

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