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  1. #1
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    What's your opinion of "mixed terrain" riding?

    Hi,

    Like probably everyone here, I love cycling of all kinds. I ride road, single speed, and full suspension bikes, and I have loved being a spectator at cyclocross and track events, even though I have tried neither.

    Recently, many people I ride with on the road have been doing "mixed terrain" rides. I went on one such ride with my single speed and I couldn't figure out what the appeal was. The same people whom I could never get to go on a mountain bike ride are now embracing mixed terrain.

    To me, it seems as if it is off-road riding light - the terrain is completely non-threatening, but the worst part is that there isn't any flow or bike handling progression that is really going to take place.

    For me, at least, mountain biking is the opposite experience of mixed terrain riding. I keep heading to the same trails for years, find new lines, new flow, and I am always improving my technique, speed, and smoothness through either personal learning, the acquisition of new bikes, or a combination of both. It is what keeps the stoke going strong for dirt riding and why my road rides have been cut down to 1x per week.

    What do people here think? Should I just take a chill pill and let the hating go, or do you also think that mixed terrain is another form of cycling and that we should embrace it not only for bringing people onto trails, but also for giving bike shops a new revenue stream that enables them to continue to thrive and be there for us?

    Albert

  2. #2
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    Since I have never heard of "mixed terrain" riding, maybe you should define WTH it is?
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  3. #3
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    do you drive to the trails vs riding to them?

  4. #4
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    are you talking about gravel rides?

    it's gaining popularity in most places. it's certainly more appealing to me than road riding. but mtb is my favorite.

  5. #5
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    The appeal is probably that one gets away from traffic, and maybe into some pleasant natural settings. Bikes like the Salsa Fargo and the Vaya and so forth work well in that scenario.

    Lots of old double-track and similar roads where I live. Very little singletrack, really. My wife and I currently share just one working vehicle. Some days the mixed-terrain rides are all that I have.

  6. #6
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    GD it, just hate it already. Seriously though, it's better than not riding. Given the option mtb always wins for me, but if I can't I'd do any kind of riding. Beats not riding.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  7. #7
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    You find a lovely unpaved road or unpopular rail to trail route, wild flowers every where, with single track off shoots here and there, small towns in between, and you put it in the big ring and grab the drops, lower your head, and hammer.

    Edit: My opinion is that it is a fun work out.

  8. #8
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    Like others have said here, it is taking a road or cross or hybrid bike on a combination of roads and unpaved double track and fire roads. Here in New England there is a stark difference in difficulty between these mixed terrain rides and even an easy mountain bike ride.

  9. #9
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    Webster: Mixed terrain riding, to ride varied terrain on a mountain bike. Rocks, cactus, roots, dirt, mud, up down and all around, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  10. #10
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    If those guys want to ride nontechnical doubletrack then good for them. Why the hell should I care? Now if they decide to ride on my lawn then we've got a problem.
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  11. #11
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    sooo... "mixed terrain" is actually Gravel Grinding "rebranded"?

    What's next- do they plan to trademark a logo for it?
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  12. #12
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    I think it's the other way around: gravel grinding is mixed terrain rebranded. I've been hearing about, and doing, mixed terrain rides since before people started talking about "gravel grinding."

    Some people like linking up nontechnical gravel roads, fire roads and trails with paved roads to make long routes. If you prefer a different kind of riding, do it. There's no accounting for tastes.

  13. #13
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    I'll chime in on this one. I ride with a "gravel grinding group". It's a better community than being a roadie around here, not to mention the traffic on the roads we ride is absolutely minimal. You couldn't pay me to ride and train on the pavement after spending so much time on gravel.

    I recently added a singlespeed cx bike to my quiver, 700x40c tires and 44x19 gearing and I've been hitting the gravel around my house having a blast. If I can't get on the mountain bike, you'll find me on the gravel bike.

  14. #14
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    I have been half tempted to buy a cx bike and try some of this, but honestly to me it's a watered down version of either. If I want to make my heart and legs explode I've got a road bike and lots of hilly terrain for hundreds of miles around me. If I wanna make my legs scream for short periods followed by my adrenaline for the same period, I've got a mountain bike. I don't really like the idea of half assing either. I can see the appeal for some but it's just not my cup of tea. I "almost" bought one last month but just couldn't convince myself so I went with a new Roubaix instead.

    With all the flooding in Tx, it'll be a while before anything I own touches dirt again anyway .

  15. #15
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    I suppose you could call my yesterday's ride mixed terrain, riding a variety of trails and connecting them with some smooth paths and streets...
    Being out of shape after recovering from a knee injury, the smooth parts were good for recovery between the rocky/rooty/twisty areas.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by slodsm View Post
    I have been half tempted to buy a cx bike and try some of this, but honestly to me it's a watered down version of either.
    I guess I look at it more as just a matter of riding whatever it is that one has nearby and convenient to ride.

    Where I live, most "mountain-biking" is still done on old doubletrack, or some mix of ATV trail and doubletrack and gravel. Our ratio of gravel to pavement is such that you limit yourself by riding a full-on road bike. Some do, and that's fine, but a gravel-capable bike opens up a huge world of beautiful places and without any worry about traffic.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    I guess I look at it more as just a matter of riding whatever it is that one has nearby and convenient to ride.

    Where I live, most "mountain-biking" is still done on old doubletrack, or some mix of ATV trail and doubletrack and gravel. Our ratio of gravel to pavement is such that you limit yourself by riding a full-on road bike. Some do, and that's fine, but a gravel-capable bike opens up a huge world of beautiful places and without any worry about traffic.

    Totally understand that man, I'm not knocking it at all. I live on the south side of Fort Worth though so I can walk out my door and jump on my road bike and head south west and have all the back country roads you could ever want to ride on a road bike. Or I can throw my mtb in my truck and go to any one of the pretty decent mtb trails around dfw or drive 45 minutes to cleburne/glen rose and have (for Texas at least) 3 really nice rocky rooty climbing descending awesome mtb trails that you can hit all in one day.

    A cx bike for me would be kind of a waste because I really couldn't place where I would actually ride it. The guy who wrenches on my bike in ft worth when I don't have a particular tool needed for something has a great gravel bike and he does the race across tx and a lot of other stuff on it. I see the appeal for things like that by far, but between having two kids, a wife, a 3000+ hour a year job and being a full time student at 37 trying to become a petroleum engineer so I can STOP working 3000 hours a year in 26 weeks I don't have the spare time to race across tx lol. I love the convenience of a light easy to maintain road bike and a mtb to take out when I want to drive to the trails.

    One day, when I'm making the same money for working 40 hours a week, I'll probably be much more interested.

  18. #18
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    road bikes make great gravel/dirt/singletrack bikes. i run 700x25's and will be out on a long road ride and throw in all kinds of dirt roads, rail road beds, singletrack......

    no need for cx bikes for dirt if yer running pavement as well. run 95-100psi for the 25's and call it good. i'm doing a 100km dirt road raid event sunday. 25's all the way.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by slodsm View Post
    A cx bike for me would be kind of a waste because I really couldn't place where I would actually ride it.
    And what you say makes perfect sense also. Buy the right bike for where you live, right? I have not always done that, and I've sort of learned the hard way that my bikes that actually get used are the ones that match my local riding conditions.

  20. #20
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    Define "mixed terrain"

    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    I suppose you could call my yesterday's ride mixed terrain, riding a variety of trails and connecting them with some smooth paths and streets...
    Being out of shape after recovering from a knee injury, the smooth parts were good for recovery between the rocky/rooty/twisty areas.
    I ride "mixed terrain" very often: I ride down my street, up a 4-wheeler hill climb, down a road to a 10 mile parkway, merge onto a multi-use path, turn into a MTB singletrack for 10 miles, then ride back home.
    I've done rides like that up to 80 miles.
    This one was shorter:
    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas (from the "Dirty Pictures thread") View Post
    A few years ago...
    Attachment 989177

    ...56 miles total to ride two MTB courses connected by farm lanes and roads in central Ohio. That was about my limit. All that mud came mostly from the farm lanes. The trails were not bad at all; just wet.
    btw - that drivetrain was still working perfectly.

    -F
    This guy mixes it up even a bit more.

    No matter how good a trail is, I always feel stupid riding in a circle. I wanna go somewhere.

    -F
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  21. #21
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    Mixed terrain didn't really make sense to me when I was living in Seattle. I'd end up riding my 'cross bike on paved MUPs for an hour, riding some boring singletrack, and riding home. It took me longer than driving to fun singletrack and the bike wasn't as much fun on either singletrack or the road as a dedicated bike. Pretty lame.

    I live in a less dense part of the state now, in a city with a really extensive network of gravel MUPs. Riding a 'cross bike with knobbies on those beats riding it with narrower slicks. And there are some small coastal mountains with dirt and gravel roads on them right near me. Trails of wildly varying difficulty too. Suddenly, the mixed terrain thing is a lot more interesting and fun.

    I see it a little more as road riding plus than mountain biking minus. Because I'd rather be riding my mountain bike on trails that are interesting and challenging on my 'A' bike, but doing road routes that incorporate some road and trail links that are too rough for me on 23 mm slicks and in road shoes lets me access cool places that otherwise I couldn't. And honestly, I don't feel that I give up much on the road when I use a 34 mm tire and my bars are 5 mm higher.
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  22. #22
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    I ride it all on large volume 29er tires (more than 3,000 miles each year). Work commutes, ride to trails then ride on 'em, urban assaults, gravel grinders, all rocks and technical, whatever.

    I enjoy long rides too. 50+ miles of stoopid through the city big loops, 65 mile of trail loops (done that on geared and single speed), an 85+ mile ride that has some pavement, gravel roads, dirt and very technical rocky trails. Ride da bike!
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  23. #23
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    I ride one bike on all terrain. It's not a cross bike, it's not a hybrid, it's not a mountain bike, it's not a fixie... it's just an effin' bike!

    In ski world I have a lot of different skis - skis for deep snow, skis for packed snow, skis for steeps, skis for flats... you get the picture...

    My goal for biking was to get away from the 'quiver' and just have one fun bike that could do it all. If that is what is meant by 'mixed terrain' cycling, then I'm all for it - it's fun if you have a bike that can handle most of that.

    I like riding my bike on asphalt. I like riding it on dirt roads. It's fun on gravel and on dirt. It's fun on a bike path or single track.

    I've always ridden like that - now I just have a better, more versatile bike with all the changes in bike tech. Back in the 90s riding a small frame 26'er with wide tires on the road was a drag at times. It also didn't climb or handle terrain nearly as well as my current bike. I've had a couple hybrid bikes and they were either stuck to smooth asphalt, or didn't perform well enough on dirt. My current bike is faster and more comfortable on asphalt than any of my previous bikes.

    I say embrace whatever the heck it is and have fun with it. If you want to box yourself into a category, go for it... if not, just ride whatever on whatever bike you want and have fun.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by newenglandrocks View Post
    Like others have said here, it is taking a road or cross or hybrid bike on a combination of roads and unpaved double track and fire roads. Here in New England there is a stark difference in difficulty between these mixed terrain rides and even an easy mountain bike ride.
    Sounds like gravel grinders to me. I've done a few myself on my mtb. I'd have preferred a CX bike if I had one.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbRN View Post
    Since I have never heard of "mixed terrain" riding, maybe you should define WTH it is?
    I've never heard that term either. Maybe it's midwest thing or some such?
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    I've never heard that term either. Maybe it's midwest thing or some such?
    I live in the "midwest" and we talk about gravel rides. We generally don't even talk about gravel "grinders". They're just gravel rides, and folks have been doing them for years. MTBers tend to ride them on mountain bikes (and usually only when the trails are slop, or in a couple places where you can connect trails to each other with gravel road routes). Roadies do them on road or cross bikes and use the biggest tires they can fit. Old gravel is fine on 25's, but fresh gravel, GTFO.

    We've got a couple races on them every year. Truly mixed surfaces. Range from pavement, to chip & seal, to old and fresh gravel, to singletrack. Folks do the races on cross bikes, touring bikes, mt bikes, and the newer dedicated gravel bikes. Each bike type does better on a different surface, so the specific route determines to some extent what bikes place higher in the final results.

    OP is from New England, where they talk funny.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by edubfromktown View Post
    I ride it all on large volume 29er tires (more than 3,000 miles each year). Work commutes, ride to trails then ride on 'em, urban assaults, gravel grinders, all rocks and technical, whatever.

    I enjoy long rides too. 50+ miles of stoopid through the city big loops, 65 mile of trail loops (done that on geared and single speed), an 85+ mile ride that has some pavement, gravel roads, dirt and very technical rocky trails. Ride da bike!
    ^^^That's what I'm talkin' about.
    In the days before riding certain trails was "illegal" I could have a really good time mixing up powerline trails, gas line trails, rail trails, hiking trails, horse trails, roads, MUPs, and even a few creek beds. No chance to put together a ride like that anymore.

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  28. #28
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    Mixed terrain? We just call it connecting the mt bike areas. I use my mt bike. Connect different areas by pedaling connecting trails, boardwalks, dirt and paved roads. I thought everyone did that. I'm north of Boston, MA. Once pedaled through 10 different properties/10 towns for a whole day with a total of 62 miles. Mixed terrain? Yup.

  29. #29
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    A gravel ride on a mountain bike is pretty boring, but on a slick tired road bike, even with slightly fatter slicks, it can be entertaining. It's also nice to get away from traffic.

    Unfortunately, in my neck of the woods (Central Ohio), virtually every road is paved. I used to ride dual sport motorcycles, and would have to ride an hour or so to get to any significant stretch of gravel.
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  30. #30
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    Did I get it right?
    It is called "Mixed Terrain". From what most are saying, it is all about riding on dirt roads? Where does the "mixed" part come in?

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  31. #31
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    Mixed terrain means a ride with some paved roads, some off-road.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by the other Anne View Post
    Mixed terrain means a ride with some paved roads, some off-road.
    By that definition, that is all the MTB riding that I ever do.

    I don't do laps, and I don't transport my bike to some wilderness an hour or two of driving way - so rides consist of trails connected by more civilized surfaces. Sometimes I ride a kilometer or two on dirt road or paved surfaces to get to the next trail. Depends on which trails I want to ride and how far I want to go. I can get an hour or two, starting from home, with a very minimal distance on smooth surfaces, but that is rough enough that I'm mainly standing on my rigid singlespeed.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Did I get it right?
    It is called "Mixed Terrain". From what most are saying, it is all about riding on dirt roads? Where does the "mixed" part come in?
    I look for a good route to have a sense of a beginning, a middle, a climax and an end. I suspect a lot of us do - I think given a choice, people prefer a loop that puts the climbing earlier, and doesn't require too much work after the headliner descent.

    So a sense of proportion is part of it. I wouldn't call a ride mixed just because I happened to ride a couple miles of dirt somewhere. There's a big road climb near where I used to live that ends that way, but it's pretty easy to ride that last bit on a slick-tired road bike and it's really not very long. It doesn't contribute much to the feel of the ride. So I just think of that as a road ride.

    A few months ago, a teammate bought a gravel bike and we did its first ride together. We rode a little bit of 'A' road to the bottom of a big ridge, a bunch of gravel MUP, a big climb on an old service road that had narrowed to trail, a bit more climbing to the summit via wider, graded dirt road, and then back along more narrowed road, with some bits of connecting singletrack. For me, that was a really fun mixed terrain ride, and something that gave me some enthusiasm for the concept. Some things that were important to me about it were that the big climb was on trail, though something I can handle on my 'cross bike, and that the return trail was fairly rugged, with some singletrack links.

    Not really a definition in an objective sense, but I think it'll be really hard to usefully generate one. I almost always ride rode to and from trailheads, but I don't see those as mixed terrain. Just mountain biking with some time spent on the road to access the trails. I think the terrain that the ride is really about needs to have some of that variety.
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  34. #34
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    Isn't this just called cross country? At least it was when I was cutting my teeth on mountain biking. There weren't so many mountains where I lived so it was really ATB - all terrain biking - aka mixed terrain? It included single track, byways, forest roads, farm tracks, country lanes, short cuts through alleys/social trails, the works..... Managed to pull together some great rides.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mookie View Post
    If those guys want to ride nontechnical doubletrack then good for them. Why the hell should I care? Now if they decide to ride on my lawn then we've got a problem.
    Agreed!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's your opinion of "mixed terrain" riding?-get-off-my-lawn.jpg  


  36. #36
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    For me, and given a choice, XC is mostly riding on singletrack, and while there's a lot that I can get myself through on a CX bike, there are a lot of trails I really enjoy on my XC mountain bike that take a ton of focus and feel a bit like riding on eggshells on my 'cross bike. I'm not about to say that a ride incorporating a blend isn't mountain biking, because accessing and linking trails can so often require some road riding. But for me, part of what makes it mixed is that the blend is on purpose, not something I live with to access the trails.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I live in the "midwest" and we talk about gravel rides. We generally don't even talk about gravel "grinders". They're just gravel rides, and folks have been doing them for years. MTBers tend to ride them on mountain bikes (and usually only when the trails are slop, or in a couple places where you can connect trails to each other with gravel road routes). Roadies do them on road or cross bikes and use the biggest tires they can fit. Old gravel is fine on 25's, but fresh gravel, GTFO.

    We've got a couple races on them every year. Truly mixed surfaces. Range from pavement, to chip & seal, to old and fresh gravel, to singletrack. Folks do the races on cross bikes, touring bikes, mt bikes, and the newer dedicated gravel bikes. Each bike type does better on a different surface, so the specific route determines to some extent what bikes place higher in the final results.

    OP is from New England, where they talk funny.
    I'm from NYS and have never heard that terminology.

    I've raced the gravel grinders, as we call them. Our major local race has since been adopted by a roadie club so it is now 95% cx riders to the point that MTB should be a stand-alone category, as fatbikes have become.
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  38. #38
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    I think they're awesome *-* I really enjoy it because I don't want my trail to be annoying .. "mixed terrain" let you experience a variety of roads and it's more challenging

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    I have never seen much fire road riding in UT. But riding a 50+ mile loop from your front door many thousands of vertical many dozens of off road miles sounds like a bad-ass activity.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheNormsk View Post
    Isn't this just called cross country?
    We prefer to be refered to as "Transcyclist".

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    HTFU and ride BMX.

    Seriously, it's a bike, it rolls - ride it wherever and have fun. I was in the bike park on my BMX here in Santa Cruz one day for a solo sesh on the wood ramps - in comes one of the Rock Lobster guys in a full kit on his CX bike. He proceeds to hit the 2ft. kickers (which require a 3 ft. flat to clear) - he jumps them all, exits the park and hammers up the hill.

    Why is roadies who want to roll their skinnies on dirt paths is such a big deal? Everybody should just roll out and shred.

  42. #42
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    I sort of feel like I have always ridden "mixed terrain". My mindset growing up (and still) was: See a path. Go on it.

    It didn't matter what it was made of. In my young days it was on a BMX bike, and now, it is still on that same BMX, or my mountain bike depending on how I feel that day...
    "It's about having pointless fun in the woods...." - Walt
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  43. #43
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    Whatever, just run what you brung.
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  44. #44
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    We have more miles of gravel roads than any other state. It is a good alternative, especially when you want to leave from your door step and go ride 30 miles, deal with minimal traffic, and see some scenery.


    Iowa Gravel Roads


    What's your opinion of "mixed terrain" riding?-ia-gravel-rds.jpg

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    IMO a mixed terrain ride is one without boundaries or limits set by terrain. I love taking my bike and just riding wherever I damn well please. Start from my house and road ride about 10 miles up to the state forest, then hop on some gravel for a bit until I see an inviting bit of single track. Jump on that and shred some gnarly rock gardens. Ride a bunch of gravel, double track, and single track to the next town for some lunch then turn around an explore the next valley over on my way home.

    Mixed terrain riding is a great way to explore your area and find new places and things that you might not have known about before.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
    -michaelscott

  46. #46
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    What's your opinion of "mixed terrain" riding?

    I have mixed feelings about it.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  47. #47
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    I've wanted a bike ideally set up for mixed terrain riding for years, and finally picked it up last week. Custom frame, 38mm slicks, set up tubeless. Drop bars. Di2 shifting. Hydro discs. Lots of BB drop for lots of stability when things get loose and sketchy. I've got another set of wheels with 25mm tires for doing all-paved rides. Basically, I'm a MTBer at heart but also like road riding, so this is my not-MTB bike.

    Picked the bike up on Thursday, and on Saturday did a great ride to break it in. 50 miles, about half paved road, the other half a mix of gravel or clay roads, some abandoned woods road, about a mile of singletrack, and a water crossing. Had a blast. Only got passed by 3 or 4 cars the whole ride.

    It's like road riding, but more interesting, better scenery, and way less traffic. It's riding bikes, it's fun!


















  48. #48
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    I just did a mixed terrain ride from my front door. Concrete, asphalt, and brick-paved roads.

    I honestly think that most road bikes should have room for at least a 35-40mm tire, plus fenders. That versatility gives you a few more options in route selection.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad_M View Post
    We have more miles of gravel roads than any other state. It is a good alternative, especially when you want to leave from your door step and go ride 30 miles, deal with minimal traffic, and see some scenery.


    Iowa Gravel Roads


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    i think i'd rather watch re-runs of cspan

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I just did a mixed terrain ride from my front door. Concrete, asphalt, and brick-paved roads.

    I honestly think that most road bikes should have room for at least a 35-40mm tire, plus fenders. That versatility gives you a few more options in route selection.
    there are PLENTY of bikes designed for what you speak of^^^

    i'll be riding my 32lb charge with 3.8 knards @ 12psi for 100k mix of pavement and gravel/dirt roads and rail beds on sunday. a raid ride with over 400 riders. most likely just 2 of us on fatbikes

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I honestly think that most road bikes should have room for at least a 35-40mm tire, plus fenders. That versatility gives you a few more options in route selection.
    Sounds like one of the less racing oriented cyclocross bikes.

    A "real" roadbike (frame, fork, brakes) won't have room for such tyres. On a local forum, a CX bike is the default suggestion if you want to get off paved surfaces, too, but don't necessarily want the more bumpy trails.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  52. #52
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    It drives me a little nuts that road racing bikes have so cornered the market that "road bike" and "racing bike" both mean road race bike to most people. As in tight clearance, no mounting holes for fenders, the whole bit.

    It's funny because I'm not necessarily poorly served by that kind of bike. Although I guess I haven't kept mine or replaced it either.

    But I think it really puts a damper on people's imagination about what they can do with a road bike. I've used mine for transportation, people still tour, I currently do some mixed-surface riding on mine. For me, those are all road bike jobs. Just not necessarily road race bike jobs.

    It also makes it really hard to talk about. There are a ton of road bikes that aren't racing bikes and a ton of kinds of racing that aren't road, but still have bikes optimized for them.

    Preaching to the choir, I know.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    It drives me a little nuts that road racing bikes have so cornered the market that "road bike" and "racing bike" both mean road race bike to most people. As in tight clearance, no mounting holes for fenders, the whole bit.

    It's funny because I'm not necessarily poorly served by that kind of bike. Although I guess I haven't kept mine or replaced it either.

    But I think it really puts a damper on people's imagination about what they can do with a road bike. I've used mine for transportation, people still tour, I currently do some mixed-surface riding on mine. For me, those are all road bike jobs. Just not necessarily road race bike jobs.

    It also makes it really hard to talk about. There are a ton of road bikes that aren't racing bikes and a ton of kinds of racing that aren't road, but still have bikes optimized for them.

    Preaching to the choir, I know.
    Exactly. Most road riders will never pin on a number, so why are they riding racing bikes? That would be like driving a race car to and from work everyday.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis1 View Post
    Exactly. Most road riders will never pin on a number, so why are they riding racing bikes? That would be like driving a race car to and from work everyday.
    Unlike race cars you can ride your race bike as fast as you can to and from work :-D But yes, a CX bike would suit most people.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    It drives me a little nuts that road racing bikes have so cornered the market that "road bike" and "racing bike" both mean road race bike to most people. As in tight clearance, no mounting holes for fenders, the whole bit.
    It's why I love my Pake C'Mute, brother. 1X10 (MTB cassette), wide MTB bars, fat 45c tires, and STEEL. I think I get more inquiries on that bike than anything. So many people on road "racing" bikes are curious about my bike, and I'm like "FREE YOUR MIND, HOMIE!"

  56. #56
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    https://www.strava.com/activities/336567405

    https://www.strava.com/activities/336560485

    These rides involved significant amounts of what seems to be referred to here as "mixed terrain". But they were mountain bike rides. I was seeking particular bits of singletrack, and though each ride involved miles of gravel roads, the gravel roads were simply connections for more singletrack.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    https://www.strava.com/activities/336567405

    https://www.strava.com/activities/336560485

    These rides involved significant amounts of what seems to be referred to here as "mixed terrain". But they were mountain bike rides. I was seeking particular bits of singletrack, and though each ride involved miles of gravel roads, the gravel roads were simply connections for more singletrack.
    We have quite a few routes like that here too, linking up trails via roads. We try to stay off pavement as much as possible, but there's always some pavement involved too.

  58. #58
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    My opinion is...who cares what my opinion is? Ride what you like and stop trying to justify/critique/bash/etc the preferences of others that differ from your own. This frame of mind applies to many other topics outside the realm of "multi terrain" riding too.
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  59. #59
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    I live in an area that has a ton of gravel and paved bikes trails. Even a little singletrack. When I ride from my house to downtown I can string together a much nicer than roadie ride. I take either my SS or the CX bike.

    Also, we have some good gravel miles around here as well that can be ridden as a mellow non tech MTB ride or on a CX for pace/cardio work. All good IMO, variety is the spice of life.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    It's why I love my Pake C'Mute, brother. 1X10 (MTB cassette), wide MTB bars, fat 45c tires, and STEEL. I think I get more inquiries on that bike than anything. So many people on road "racing" bikes are curious about my bike, and I'm like "FREE YOUR MIND, HOMIE!"
    Yo, I realise this is an old post, but there's not much just experience with the c'mute out there.. Reckon you could go any fatter than 45c tyres? If so how fat?

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by asunder View Post
    Yo, I realise this is an old post, but there's not much just experience with the c'mute out there.. Reckon you could go any fatter than 45c tyres? If so how fat?

    Good luck, Dion hasn't posted here since the Mesozoic Era.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  62. #62
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    Never mind... zombie post brought to life.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh View Post
    Never mind... zombie post brought to life.
    And moved from Passion after 3 years of dormancy. LOL
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  64. #64
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    Around my way it's called 'whatevering' and it means doing a road ride, but on a super old steel road bike with wide tires and panniers, then taking a picture of your bike near a big rock or on the bank of a creek with your artisan coffee press on a butane stove in the background.

    Seriously though, I think the people that say stuff like 'mixed terrain' and 'whatevering' just want to sound cooler than road or gravel riders, but without actually having to do something cooler than road or gravel rides.

    If it's all you got then sure, I'd do it it too, but if you're acting like it's some new, cool trend that I should be impressed or even interested by then you're a goober.

    Edit: Damn it all to hell, zombie threads always get me.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    And moved from Passion after 3 years of dormancy. LOL
    Over half the threads on the first two page-down on Passion have been moved. I think they're doing it just to troll you personally

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Over half the threads on the first two page-down on Passion have been moved. I think they're doing it just to troll you personally
    Yep, but itís not their but he. Immaturity level at that age is amazing to me. Itís like an elementary school yard mentality.

    Granted many of those threads donít belong there, but really? There are some with many years running and active daily if not weekly that do belong there. Thereís one that was started by a Super Mod in 2011 and was active [a favorite actually] thread in Passion. Now suddenly 7 years later Itís doomed to live itís remaining two months in General. A slow painful death.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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