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  1. #1
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    What size Camelbak should I get?

    I ride off road trails for no more than 2 hours, and city streets for no more than a 1/2 hour.
    Last edited by jh251; 07-13-2008 at 07:26 PM.

  2. #2
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    50 oz. should be enough for what you discribe.
    Start your ride fully hydrated and 50 oz. should be enough.
    I have a 100 oz'er but hate the waist strap and the added weight.
    I carry only tubes and soft stuff in the C'bak.
    Tools and hard stuff in seatbag.
    Carrying tools in the C'bak is like carrying a personal rock/pointy thing to fall on.
    This can puncture the c'bak blatter...or yours.
    Tilos

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tilos
    50 oz. should be enough for what you discribe.
    Start your ride fully hydrated and 50 oz. should be enough.
    I have a 100 oz'er but hate the waist strap and the added weight.
    I carry only tubes and soft stuff in the C'bak.
    Tools and hard stuff in seatbag.
    Carrying tools in the C'bak is like carrying a personal rock/pointy thing to fall on.
    This can puncture the c'bak blatter...or yours.
    Tilos
    Good points.

  4. #4
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    2 hours isn't that long. but buying an 100oz pack doesn't mean you need to fill all 100oz every time you go out.

    i say go bigger. i'm always stepping up my ride times and i upgraded from 70 to 100 rather quickly because there just wasn't enough water or space to carry sufficient tools/clothing/food.

    after only one really long walk i've tried to play it safe in terms of preparation.
    allens/chainbreak tool, extra chain links, couple cliff bars, banana, maybe sandwiches, a spare tube, patchkit, some tape, a light long sleeve or rain shell, sometimes another pair of socks. it adds up really quick.

    Carrying tools in the C'bak is like carrying a personal rock/pointy thing to fall on.
    This can puncture the c'bak blatter...or yours.
    ? bladder/back padding protects you well. and you can always carry your allen set (only real pointy/hard thing) in the way back pocket.

    I have a 100 oz'er but hate the waist strap and the added weight.
    on my 'h.a.w.g' the waiststrap is completely removable. the (minimal) extra weight just makes you stronger.

  5. #5
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    Camelback Hawg

    I love my Camelback!

    This is 100 oz ..... of course, you don't have to fill it all the way. It also gives me plenty of room to carry a spare jacket, food, tools, etc. You might also like the large reservoir capacity for those really hot days when you drink/sweat gallons. The straps are all quite comfortable and I've been amazed how well designed they are. I even use mine for hiking and it works great.

    I also had a mule which was smaller and still carried 100 oz. It could be a better option if you want something smaller. It too, was excellent.

    My suggestion is to head to the LBS and try a few on for size. I'm sure you'll find one you like.

    Good luck!
    I'm trying to think but nothing happens!

  6. #6
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    I've got a 70oz now and plan on getting a 100oz shortly, because i run out of water quite a lot.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter
    I've got a 70oz now and plan on getting a 100oz shortly, because i run out of water quite a lot.
    How many hours of riding do you do?

  8. #8
    SSolo, on your left!
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomit
    2 hours isn't that long. but buying an 100oz pack doesn't mean you need to fill all 100oz every time you go out.

    after only one really long walk i've tried to play it safe in terms of preparation.
    allens/chainbreak tool, extra chain links, couple cliff bars, banana, maybe sandwiches, a spare tube, patchkit, some tape, a light long sleeve or rain shell, sometimes another pair of socks. it adds up really quick.

    on my 'h.a.w.g' the waiststrap is completely removable. the (minimal) extra weight just makes you stronger.
    X2.............100 ounce (3L)...my Mule is great and i love having two straps keeps the pack right where I want it. Don't even feel it anymore when I ride....forget its' there until I need the map or a snack/tool, etc,
    Get off the couch and ride!

  9. #9
    OnTheTrailAgain
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    M.U.L.E.



    Better to have more than you need and "not" need it,
    then to need it and "not" have it.



    Last edited by 2ndgen; 07-14-2008 at 02:36 AM.

  10. #10
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    Yesterday I rode 7 hours and drank three full camelbacks and a gatorade. I also had several glasses of lemonade when I stopped for luch. I was still slightly dehydrated when I got to work. It was 100 degrees though.

  11. #11
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    I still use my Mule that I bought back in '95 or '96. (It was also a 100oz bladder back then.) I love it. Been using it that long and never had a problem with tools puncturing a bladder. It's insulation keeps your water cold, and you have room to stuff a sweatshirt in the bungies during colder morning rides that warm up later.

    I rarely fill it all the way, but recently I needed all 70oz or so that I put in during a hot 2-hour ride while being a bit hungover. Just an example of a time when it's nice to have that volume available.

  12. #12
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    Sure an 100oz'er is great for unsupported Epic rides, that's why I have one.

    That 100 oz'er stays home as the 50 oz'er gets the most use for weekly/daily "short" rides.
    I guess if you only have one, the 100 or 70's the way to go.

    If you ride/use it, it's gonna wear out and need replacing, so why not have different gear for different types of rides.
    A little more investment up front with way better service throughout product life( buy2).

    Yeh, an 100 can carry everything you need for a 7-8 hour ride but the extra STUFF tends to stay in there...forever.

    Nothing is scarier than digging deep into your pack for a tube only to find out the multi-tool has rubbed a hole in it 'cause it's been in there forever.

    Something about seeing someone riding in a location with 20 or less miles of trails with a fully loaded 100 oz'er says ah, homeless(?) to me.
    Hey, I guess it could be full of sandbags for race training...endurance training.

    Tilos

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    I've got a HAWG. I've replaced it once because the styling of the pack changed and I wanted it. My first ('98 model) is my backup/unprepared/newbie to riding friend ride pack and still in great shape. I keep my "essentials" in there all the time and I don't like seat packs. After a few minutes I don't even notice my pack on my back, that's why the straps are adjustable and waist is removable, for comfort. It should fit like it is a part of you or else you need to readjust it.

    If wearing out is a concern, remember Camelbak has military/le contracts so they make durable stuff and stand behind it. If you learn how to pack you won't ever have a problem with things poking through. I've flipped and landed on my back and the pack actually helped avoid injury to the ground with the bladder acting as a cushion, and it has never leaked (I average 210#).

    Tilos makes some good cautionary notes, but what to do if you can't afford several packs? Instead of the size of the pack, be concerned with your need for hydration. Everyone is different on this, but remember you can put 50 or 70 oz of fluid into a 100oz bladder, but you can't put 100oz in a 50. I find it scary that someone else will tell you or me how much water you will require, encouraging you to have less than what your body may need. I wouldn't know if I was fully hydrated when starting if I am at rest and if I take in too much it will make it harder to get moving and my body to absorb. If someone can get by with less, great for them, but they probably know their body very well. Being thirsty is different than being dehydrated. Dehydration can be nasty and you don't want that to happen, especially if you can avoid it.

    Like others have said, better to have and not need than need and not have. If you don't want to carry gear, just get the smallest pack you can with the biggest bladder. At least then you will know you have it if you drink more for some reason (body's need, hotter temperatures, accident, etc).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tilos
    Sure an 100oz'er is great for unsupported Epic rides, that's why I have one.

    That 100 oz'er stays home as the 50 oz'er gets the most use for weekly/daily "short" rides.
    I guess if you only have one, the 100 or 70's the way to go.

    If you ride/use it, it's gonna wear out and need replacing, so why not have different gear for different types of rides.
    A little more investment up front with way better service throughout product life( buy2).

    Yeh, an 100 can carry everything you need for a 7-8 hour ride but the extra STUFF tends to stay in there...forever.

    Nothing is scarier than digging deep into your pack for a tube only to find out the multi-tool has rubbed a hole in it 'cause it's been in there forever.
    why so anti-decent sized pack?
    i don't understand.

    nothing's scarier than digging into your camelback to find an old something? ...i'll tell you what's worse. being 10 miles from home/car in the rain with little water, no shell, a busted presta valve and no spare tube because you couldn't fit it in your 50oz camelback. might have started out as a little jaunt on a relatively short trail, but that can change in a hurry.

    now i'm not being mr. safety freak that avoids biking because stuff can go wrong. a ride can turn into an epic regardless of your preparedness. but if a pound or two added to your back can spare a long walk or dehydration or hypothermia...why wouldn't you take it?

    Something about seeing someone riding in a location with 20 or less miles of trails with a fully loaded 100 oz'er says ah, homeless(?) to me.
    so people who connect trails look homeless you to?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed
    I still use my Mule that I bought back in '95 or '96. (It was also a 100oz bladder back then.) I love it. Been using it that long and never had a problem with tools puncturing a bladder. It's insulation keeps your water cold, and you have room to stuff a sweatshirt in the bungies during colder morning rides that warm up later.

    I rarely fill it all the way, but recently I needed all 70oz or so that I put in during a hot 2-hour ride while being a bit hungover. Just an example of a time when it's nice to have that volume available.
    Generally, tools should be kept in a case anyway I'd think.

    I put tools loose in my MULE yesterday and it just didn't seem right to me.

    So I'm going to put them in a 99 Cents Store case that'll fit and that'll keep them all in one place.


  16. #16
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    One more vote for the camelback mule. I'd rather dump water out after a ride than run out.
    plus it has plenty of room for storage.
    LIVE TO RIDE - RIDE TO LIVE

  17. #17
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    The bladder goes inside an insulated sleeve separate from the tools-pouch. I just don't see any way the bladder is going to get punctured. I also have landed on my back on some rocks a few times. Never punctured a bladder. It's also pretty hard for anything besides a knife or nail to puncture a deflated tube... and you can put the tubes in a separate pouch anyway. (I carry two tubes all the time.)

    I just had to replace the bladder a few seasons ago. So, the first one lasted 9-10 years. I only replaced it because some mold started to develop in the straw and I figured I'd just replace the bladder+straw instead of trying to wash out the straw.

  18. #18
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    my opinion.........

    Go 70. I have an old 70 oz Rocket (I don't recommend it, fits weird, bladder ends up like a sphere when full) and a Mule. The mule is great for rides over 2 hours, or on rides in unfamiliar territory. It's just so big. Yes you can only fill it half way for short rides, but it's just overkill. I've been tempted by a CB Rouge, but haven't found one in a shop to fondle......

    If you go on a long ride, put a bottle on the frame, old school style....

    Waist straps.......If you know how to bunnyhop, you will want the waist strap. Otherwise the pack will hit you in the back of the helmet everytime you hop something......
    '15 Giant Anthem SX - '01 Schwinn Homegrown Comp - '12 Giant Defy 1 - '14 Kona Jake the Snake

  19. #19
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    Even a mere 1 hour ride would benefit from carrying a spare tube, tools, small 1st aid kit, cell phone, house keys, snack, oh...and water.


  20. #20
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    Yeah..."real" old school!


  21. #21
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    2ndgen says it - MULE - the pack is big enough to grow into, and you only have to put in 50 Oz of water for shorter rides - if it's hot or you want to go longer - put in more water! I use it for everything, from 1-hour quick loops to 5 - 7 hour epics. On the real long rides, if the refills are far-between (or non-existent) I'll carry 2 bottles on my frame and a small bottle in the back mesh part of the pack. If you only have one pack, get something mid-sized or larger so you have options!
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  22. #22
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    Yeah, I like it's capacity to carry both water "and" a bottle or two inside
    (I can't drink "just" water...I need a little flavor when I make my first stop).

    I don't carry anything on my frame because I like to jump a lot.


  23. #23
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    if i haven't convinced you enough already...
    My Ride From Hell !!

  24. #24
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    I'll be looking at the 50oz and 70oz next time I go to the bike store. Like I said, I won't be riding more than 2 hours. If I bought the 70oz, it carries more water, but also more room for other things?? tube, snacks, tools etc.....

  25. #25
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    doesn't hurt to shove in an extra water bottle in the camelback for safe measure.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh251
    I'll be looking at the 50oz and 70oz next time I go to the bike store. Like I said, I won't be riding more than 2 hours. If I bought the 70oz, it carries more water, but also more room for other things?? tube, snacks, tools etc.....
    The difference between a 70oz bladder and a 100oz bladder is negligible.
    The storage side of the pack is what determines your storage capacity.
    You don't store anything in the bladder pocket.
    Just a note.

  27. #27
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  28. #28
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    Camelbak classic: 70oz. $22

    Just enough pocket for important tools and an elastic strap which can be used for holding a water bottle.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  29. #29
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    I have a classic 70 oz. which would fit your ride lengths very well... however if you have a "thirsty" day you'll kill it off before your rides over... nothng sux worse than sucking that last sip out o' the pack before the ride's over!!!

    I'll be stepping up to the Mayhem 100oz soon... I think the Classic is cheap enough to start w/ and then upgrade to something bigger later on... there's nothing wrong with more than one canteen!!!
    "Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government!..." -- Dennis the Peasant

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jh251
    I ride off road trails for no more than 2 hours, and city streets for no more than a 1/2 hour.
    I had a MULE for a few years and then got a HAWG. Honestly, I don't see any advantage to the smaller MULE over the HAWG. I can pack light in the HAWG if I want to (50 oz water) and it compresses down to the size it needs to. On the other hand it can hold a lot more if it needs to, including an extra layer or two inside the pack.

  31. #31
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    It's the difference between a butter knife and a multi-use knife.


  32. #32
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    its personal preference. You have to evaluate:
    What are you going to carry in your pack?
    What are the longest regular rides you do, and how much do you drink on those rides?
    What features are you looking for in a new bag?
    Everything else falls into place!
    RIDE

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed
    The bladder goes inside an insulated sleeve separate from the tools-pouch. I just don't see any way the bladder is going to get punctured. I also have landed on my back on some rocks a few times. Never punctured a bladder. It's also pretty hard for anything besides a knife or nail to puncture a deflated tube... and you can put the tubes in a separate pouch anyway...

    I just had to replace the bladder a few seasons ago. So, the first one lasted 9-10 years. I only replaced it because some mold started to develop in the straw and I figured I'd just replace the bladder+straw instead of trying to wash out the straw.
    X2 and I put my tubes, inflator, CO2 cartridges and anything else like that into quart sized Ziploc freezer bags, just in case something should try to make a hole in my spare tube or whatever. Definitley no worries of puncturing the Camelbak bladder.

    FYI, REI near me sells the straw tube, bite valve and all the other little parts seperately and has them in stock.

    Quote Originally Posted by ATBScott
    2ndgen says it - MULE - the pack is big enough to grow into, and you only have to put in 50 Oz of water for shorter rides - if it's hot or you want to go longer - put in more water! I use it for everything, from 1-hour quick loops to 5 - 7 hour epics. On the real long rides, if the refills are far-between (or non-existent) I'll carry 2 bottles on my frame and a small bottle in the back mesh part of the pack. If you only have one pack, get something mid-sized or larger so you have options!
    X2.....it's frickin hot here in summer and I too carry two large bottles on my frame and the Mule full of water....haven't added a small bottle in the Mule, but it could be done. I carry multi-tool, spare tube, dry patch kit, cellphone, keys, several snack bars, shot blocks, CO2 inflator w/four cartridges, spare pair of gloves, two pants leg reflector velcro strap thingies, and map/directions for where we're riding all in my Mule and still have a little room for wind-breaker etc. in mine. A minute into the ride I forget it's on my back until I need something out of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by nomit
    ...so people who connect trails look homeless you to?
    Maybe he saw me after a long hot day of riding covered in sweat, dirt, and dust? LOL
    Last edited by Natedogz; 07-15-2008 at 09:00 PM.
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  34. #34
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    I can't see myself riding for distance without my MULE.

    Even to just carry my keys, cash, cell phone, sunglasses (when not wearing them) and a snack it's just so much better than having to have every pocket I have stuffed with something that can fall out on a trail or while jumping.

    I can understand the bare-bones approach if one is riding on a trail with other riders around that can help them if they have a problem (minor breakdown, etc...) and if they were within walking distance to help.

    2 each his/her own.


  35. #35
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    I just bought a MULE a few days ago and I love it! I had a regular 50oz CamelBak, But it just DIDNT hold enough water! Cheapest place I found for the mule was www.treefortbikes.com
    adam • michigan • karate monkey

  36. #36
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    You need two packs.

    A smallish pack for short rides: Camelback Lobo does a nice job.
    A larger pack for longer rides, gear, pads, etc. Dakine Nomad is really the pack of choice.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLL
    You need two packs.

    A smallish pack for short rides: Camelback Lobo does a nice job.
    A larger pack for longer rides, gear, pads, etc. Dakine Nomad is really the pack of choice.
    Makes all the sense in the world.



    The thing is, carry water no matter what.

  38. #38
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    I can easily run through 100oz is just over an hour to 1 1/2 hours where I live (in the summer time) so I have a Mule and a Hawg. I bought the Hawg so I could carry a second bladder in the summer and extra layers when riding up north in the less predictable weather. Bottom line is I have not used the Mule, aside from hiking, since I bought the Hawg. It just works better if you carry stuff in addition to water. Once the Mule is filled to 100oz's, the storage compartment is quite cramped and small.

    If you are a weight weenie then use a small pack or a carbon fiber water bottle holder if that floats your boat, but if you like roomy pack big enough for extra fluids on those epic rides in summer, try the Hawg.

  39. #39
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    Agreed on the MULE's lesser capacity.
    It's enough though for a nice long ride.
    But I like being overprepared so...

    That's my next Camelback...HAWG:


  40. #40
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    The 50oz. Rogue will hold more than enough water for your rides, and has enough pockets to hold needed tube, tools, even has a mini pump pocket. I find the Mule too big and bulky with space I don't use.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    I can easily run through 100oz is just over an hour to 1 1/2 hours where I live (in the summer time) so I have a Mule and a Hawg. I bought the Hawg so I could carry a second bladder in the summer and extra layers when riding up north in the less predictable weather. Bottom line is I have not used the Mule, aside from hiking, since I bought the Hawg. It just works better if you carry stuff in addition to water. Once the Mule is filled to 100oz's, the storage compartment is quite cramped and small.

    If you are a weight weenie then use a small pack or a carbon fiber water bottle holder if that floats your boat, but if you like roomy pack big enough for extra fluids on those epic rides in summer, try the Hawg.
    Have to agree that the storage in my Mule is a bit tight when the bladder is very full....but not too tight. However, where I ride it's easy to run through two large bottles and my bladder........may buy a Hawg and carry a second 100 oz bladder in it. Great idea! Last week part of my trail went through a lake and the water splashed off my tires all over the tops of my still full water bottles. I dried them off on my shirt and then let them sit awhile as I rode baking in the sun before I drank from them. Never know what cooties are in the lakes, on the ground etc. Had horse chit on em before too....nice flavor.
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  42. #42
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLL
    A smallish pack for short rides: Camelback Lobo does a nice job.
    Yesterday, my 3 liter /100oz Lobo lasted me a 5 hour ride. That depends on the weather and how much you like to drink, of course.

  43. #43
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    delete........

  44. #44
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    I have both the Mule and Hawg. I usually use the Hawg now days because the mule was just a tad small for all my "necessities". But then I am kind of a gadget nerd too. For what you are doing I would say get the Mule. It's better to have just a little extra room and/or some extra H2O capacity.

  45. #45
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    Something about seeing someone riding in a location with 20 or less miles of trails with a fully loaded 100 oz'er says ah, homeless(?) to me.
    Tell that to the person who had a break down a mile 19... Pushing a bike even a mile or two over singletrack sucks.

  46. #46
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    LOL!

    Yeah, you'd never see a guy with a loaded MULE (loaded with tubes, patches, tools, etc...) "walking" his bike!

    How "cool" or "homefull" does a guy with no pack on look while everybody is blasting past him and he's "walking" his bike!

    LOL!

  47. #47
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    Is there an Echo in here

    Quote Originally Posted by TLL
    You need two packs.

    A smallish pack for short rides: Camelback Lobo does a nice job.
    A larger pack for longer rides, gear, pads, etc. Dakine Nomad is really the pack of choice.
    Tilos

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by user440
    Tell that to the person who had a break down a mile 19... Pushing a bike even a mile or two over singletrack sucks.
    Yep. The longer I've been riding, the more stuff makes it's way into my pack on a permanent basis. (pump, tube, patch kit, very large multi-tool, one more energy bar than what I plan on eating, small petzel headlamp, an extra windshell unless there is NO posibility of needing it, and 20 oz more water than I plan on drinking.

    Some of these things have already earned their weight/space, some were adopted after hating life without them, and some are most often used by the unprepared slobs I always end up riding with, or come across on the trail (broken down, dehydrated, or bonked).

  49. #49
    Just a punk in the street
    Reputation: Last Child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    184
    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndgen
    LOL!

    Yeah, you'd never see a guy with a loaded MULE (loaded with tubes, patches, tools, etc...) "walking" his bike!

    How "cool" or "homefull" does a guy with no pack on look while everybody is blasting past him and he's "walking" his bike!

    LOL!
    It always cracks me up when people are worried about how "cool" they "look". Signs of a weak mind no doubt.

    "Hey does this camelbak make my BUTT look BIG?"

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    65
    I had a 70 oz bladder which served me well until the day I got lost with my friends. There's nothing worse than being lost with no water and catching cramps repeatedly. I now have a 100 oz bladder which I fill up to the brim on every ride, although, I rarely drink more than 60 oz. But I'll rather be prepared for impromptu excursions.

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