Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 101 to 200 of 307
  1. #101
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by 04 F2000SL View Post
    If you want to see a real joke check out salida co. Zero real jobs, housing is insane, 400k for cookie cutter or a 1970s manufactured home... I don’t know what they are thinking.

    The pacific north west has great trails and great jobs in Portland and Tacoma but the housing is expensive but the homes are at least semi worth the money. When compared salida or another po dunk millionaire town it’s hard to beat
    The Californication of Colorado is real. People are fleeing CA in droves, and when they sell their 2 bdrm rancher for $1M+, paying cash for a $400K house in paradise is like hitting the lottery for them.


    .

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    48
    Don't know where that might be but I can tell you where it's NOT. Miami, FL!

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porkchop_Power's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    237
    In all honestly $400K for a vacation house is fairly affordable for a large part of the population that is older. If you do the math on buying a $400K house in Salida and renting it via ABNB even 50% of the time you can easily cover your mortgage and other expenses. This is becoming more and more common and Salida is only 2 hours from the Springs and 3 from Denver. Having been in Canyon City recently I can easily see the same thing happening now that trails are being built and it becoming a winter riding destination while renting the place in the summer to the hoards of out of state tourists that come for rafting, etc. while we enjoy the high altitude rides. Also, I am 100% tired of the I70 mess and look forward to skiing Monarch more while riding the local trails the next day.

    Also, F Boulder and the front range. Both of these places (and Breck and Winter Park, Crested Butte, Eagle, etc) ARE BUILDING A SHITLOAD OF ****ING TRAILS. And they are awesome, close to town, and connect to much longer backcountry rides.

    Sure the locals may not all like this but it is really mixed. Talk to anyone who owns a restaurant or antique store or something and they LOVE the tourists and know that is where there cash comes from. Even renting a full house ArBnB in these towns is still dirt cheap as compared to going to a resort. And while the tourists may not bring high paying IT / finance jobs they do provide steady blue collar work for others. Just look at how many new landscaping / property management positions have popped up in these towns. Please also realize that the percent of local population with college degrees is tiny in these places as compared to a major city so these jobs make sense. Additionally most people I know work remotley and can spend a large portion of their time in these towns riding during the day and getting most of their work done off hours.

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    77
    They actually chose Bella Vista instead of Bentonville and a little more on that area:

    There are a ton of lakes there as well which helps out with the humidity. My inlaws live on a lake there, and we spend our summer weekends there constantly. Get up early, ride until noon, then hit the lake/pool all afternoon. It's not a bad life.

    BV currently has the Back40 and Blowing Springs (and I'd argue that the entrance to Phase I Slaughter Pen and Coler are both pretty much in Bella Vista as well). They're about to get another 40 (I've heard possibly 80!?) miles of trail developed on the West side of Interstate 49 supposedly as well. Only problem with BV is that it was originally a retirement golf community, so the politics and tone of the place still tends to be a little elderly, though that's changing as the median age has dropped rapidly over the last 5 years.


    NWA is hard to beat.

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,737
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    The Californication of Colorado is real. People are fleeing CA in droves, and when they sell their 2 bdrm rancher for $1M+, paying cash for a $400K house in paradise is like hitting the lottery for them.


    .
    I'd wager most of the money coming into Salida is from Texas.

    Seems to me it's easier to make a decent living in CO mountain towns right now than it's ever been for blue collar. Salida property prices are fairly recent, I see a couple businesses new to town couldn't even survive one meager winter season though.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    The Californication of Colorado is real. People are fleeing CA in droves, and when they sell their 2 bdrm rancher for $1M+, paying cash for a $400K house in paradise is like hitting the lottery for them.


    .
    You know, I hear that but don't believe it. Why then is housing in such short supply and prices and rents so high in CA if everyone is fleeing?

  7. #107
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    You know, I hear that but don't believe it. Why then is housing in such short supply and prices and rents so high in CA if everyone is fleeing?
    "Census Bureau data show California lost just over 138,000 people to domestic migration in the 12 months ended in July 2017."

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/19/cali...ing-state.html

    I can't even tell you how many people I run into who just moved here from California, even here in Colorado Springs.

    .

  8. #108
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    813
    People have been fleeing CA from at least as far back as I can remember. Wasn't Bend referred to some time ago not-so-lovingly as "Ben Diego?"
    ¯\(°_o)/¯

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,952
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    They actually chose Bella Vista instead of Bentonville and a little more on that area:

    There are a ton of lakes there as well which helps out with the humidity. My inlaws live on a lake there, and we spend our summer weekends there constantly. Get up early, ride until noon, then hit the lake/pool all afternoon. It's not a bad life.

    BV currently has the Back40 and Blowing Springs (and I'd argue that the entrance to Phase I Slaughter Pen and Coler are both pretty much in Bella Vista as well). They're about to get another 40 (I've heard possibly 80!?) miles of trail developed on the West side of Interstate 49 supposedly as well. Only problem with BV is that it was originally a retirement golf community, so the politics and tone of the place still tends to be a little elderly, though that's changing as the median age has dropped rapidly over the last 5 years.


    NWA is hard to beat.
    A Retirement golf community in AR ? Tough to beat? Hmmm OK. Lets go with that. Deep humid south, bible belt politics. Cheers.

  10. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    A Retirement golf community in AR ? Tough to beat? Hmmm OK. Lets go with that. Deep humid south, bible belt politics. Cheers.
    I'll take clueless for $100 Alex.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    They actually chose Bella Vista instead of Bentonville and a little more on that area:

    There are a ton of lakes there as well which helps out with the humidity. My inlaws live on a lake there, and we spend our summer weekends there constantly. Get up early, ride until noon, then hit the lake/pool all afternoon. It's not a bad life.

    BV currently has the Back40 and Blowing Springs (and I'd argue that the entrance to Phase I Slaughter Pen and Coler are both pretty much in Bella Vista as well). They're about to get another 40 (I've heard possibly 80!?) miles of trail developed on the West side of Interstate 49 supposedly as well. Only problem with BV is that it was originally a retirement golf community, so the politics and tone of the place still tends to be a little elderly, though that's changing as the median age has dropped rapidly over the last 5 years.


    NWA is hard to beat.
    Honestly it was a bit pedantic on their part to seperate the two. They both directly abut.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    "Census Bureau data show California lost just over 138,000 people to domestic migration in the 12 months ended in July 2017."

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/19/cali...ing-state.html

    I can't even tell you how many people I run into who just moved here from California, even here in Colorado Springs.

    .
    I find that article very hard to believe. If everyone is fleeing, then why are the freeways jammed, rents so high, whose buying these homes, etc.? Census bureau data? Isn't that done every 10 years? Pure BS from fake news media CNBC. Sure, folks are leaving, but there must be more coming in to take their place. Believe me, I live in the Bay Area and I tell you it's getting more crowded, not less.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PornstarRyan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    64
    I'd vote for Grand Junction. GJ puts you close to lots of local trails and also gives you access to many of the best MTB trails in the country within a two hour drive. Plus no traffic and practically year-round riding (even if the summer is a little toasty).
    Ryan Harry
    Pornstar Bike Company
    www.pornstarbike.com

  14. #114
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,392
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    I find that article very hard to believe. If everyone is fleeing, then why are the freeways jammed, rents so high, whose buying these homes, etc.? Census bureau data? Isn't that done every 10 years? Pure BS from fake news media CNBC. Sure, folks are leaving, but there must be more coming in to take their place. Believe me, I live in the Bay Area and I tell you it's getting more crowded, not less.
    The Bay Area gaining population and CA losing population are not mutually exclusive.

    Also, the Census makes continual population estimates every year.

    Not “fake news” at all.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    The Bay Area gaining population and CA losing population are not mutually exclusive.

    Also, the Census makes continual population estimates every year.

    Not “fake news” at all.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sorry, not buying it.

  16. #116
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    I find that article very hard to believe. If everyone is fleeing, then why are the freeways jammed, rents so high, whose buying these homes, etc.?
    I don't know dude. Go do your own Google research if you want. As stated by others, one area can gain while others lose, but overall, it's a fact that the state is losing.....at least losing people who are "documented".


    .

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745

    What MTB town has the lowest cost of living?

    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    I don't know dude. Go do your own Google research if you want. As stated by others, one area can gain while others lose, but overall, it's a fact that the state is losing.....at least losing people who are "documented".


    .
    Yeah, maybe on that... Most of the state's population are in the major metropolitan areas. I haven't looked, but I don't think LA, San Diego, etc. are losing population. I wish it were true, but don't think it is, at least from my "boots on the ground" perspective. Thinking of fleeing myself, but the Mediterranean like climate here is a plus.

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,948
    probably ones that have really crappy LBS

  19. #119
    aka Manzanita Tom
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    86
    Kinda surprised with all these replies that there’s been almost no mention at all of Bend. No trails? Or too expensive? Or? (Just met a visitor on my local trail from there, who said he moved there recently and loves it).

  20. #120
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by tammin View Post
    Kinda surprised with all these replies that there’s been almost no mention at all of Bend. No trails? Or too expensive? Or? (Just met a visitor on my local trail from there, who said he moved there recently and loves it).
    People don’t usually say “Bend” and “low cost of living” in the same sentence.

  21. #121
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    31,623
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    "Census Bureau data show California lost just over 138,000 people to domestic migration in the 12 months ended in July 2017."

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/19/cali...ing-state.html

    I can't even tell you how many people I run into who just moved here from California, even here in Colorado Springs.

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    People have been fleeing CA from at least as far back as I can remember. Wasn't Bend referred to some time ago not-so-lovingly as "Ben Diego?"
    People migrate. I never understood the mindset of the local mentality anywhere. People who are born a state and remain there get an attitude towards people that move into that state from other states. Get over it, people migrate.

    This rant by no means was directed at either one of you.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    They actually chose Bella Vista instead of Bentonville and a little more on that area:

    There are a ton of lakes there as well which helps out with the humidity. My inlaws live on a lake there, and we spend our summer weekends there constantly. Get up early, ride until noon, then hit the lake/pool all afternoon. It's not a bad life.

    BV currently has the Back40 and Blowing Springs (and I'd argue that the entrance to Phase I Slaughter Pen and Coler are both pretty much in Bella Vista as well). They're about to get another 40 (I've heard possibly 80!?) miles of trail developed on the West side of Interstate 49 supposedly as well. Only problem with BV is that it was originally a retirement golf community, so the politics and tone of the place still tends to be a little elderly, though that's changing as the median age has dropped rapidly over the last 5 years.


    NWA is hard to beat.
    We actually have a lot in Bella Vista and have toyed with the idea of relocating and building. Just a matter of actually pulling up our roots; more mine, as the wife is from the NWA/SW MO area. The pay for my career field is pathetic there so it’s hard to pull the trigger.

  23. #123
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by zgxtreme View Post
    We actually have a lot in Bella Vista and have toyed with the idea of relocating and building. Just a matter of actually pulling up our roots; more mine, as the wife is from the NWA/SW MO area. The pay for my career field is pathetic there so it’s hard to pull the trigger.
    The riding is just getting crazier and crazier here, but taking a major pay cut (unless offset by a major reduction in living cost) would be hard to swallow. The new push in trail building here seems to be toward more challenging technical trails with large drops and other expert level features which has been a welcome development (Semenuk was also recently sighted consulting on the new downhill line in Eureka Springs).

  24. #124
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    28,908
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    People migrate. I never understood the mindset of the local mentality anywhere. People who are born a state and remain there get an attitude towards people that move into that state from other states. Get over it, people migrate.

    This rant by no means was directed at either one of you.
    Exactly. At least the native americans have the closest claim toward being able to say "here first", but for everyone else, at some point someone had kids and those kids decided to move somewhere else, so anyone that says anything about other people moving away/to another place can shut the hell up, because it's totally hypocritical. Why was it ok for you/your family back when it happened, but not for other people?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  25. #125
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    People migrate. I never understood the mindset of the local mentality anywhere. People who are born a state and remain there get an attitude towards people that move into that state from other states. Get over it, people migrate.

    This rant by no means was directed at either one of you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Exactly. At least the native americans have the closest claim toward being able to say "here first", but for everyone else, at some point someone had kids and those kids decided to move somewhere else, so anyone that says anything about other people moving away/to another place can shut the hell up, because it's totally hypocritical. Why was it ok for you/your family back when it happened, but not for other people?
    Agreed. I actually feel kind of sad for people who've never lived anywhere except the same county in which they were born. There's a huge world out there.

  26. #126
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,135
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Agreed. I actually feel kind of sad for people who've never lived anywhere except the same county in which they were born. There's a huge world out there.
    I was technically moved to another country, but I'm glad I've lived in two differnt worlds. There is no better way to learn, than traveling.

    It's really tough to leave Cali, but as I get older, the thoughts of a more simple way of life, its very appealing.

  27. #127
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by zgxtreme View Post
    We actually have a lot in Bella Vista and have toyed with the idea of relocating and building. Just a matter of actually pulling up our roots; more mine, as the wife is from the NWA/SW MO area. The pay for my career field is pathetic there so it’s hard to pull the trigger.
    What is your career field if you don't mind me asking. Salaries here very all over the place for quite a few different careers.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    The riding is just getting crazier and crazier here, but taking a major pay cut (unless offset by a major reduction in living cost) would be hard to swallow. The new push in trail building here seems to be toward more challenging technical trails with large drops and other expert level features which has been a welcome development (Semenuk was also recently sighted consulting on the new downhill line in Eureka Springs).
    Yeah, coming from Oklahoma (OKC) it wouldn’t be much of a cost of living adjustment. So the sacrifice would all be in the paycheck.

    Fortunately, the in-law’s farm is just 20 mins north taking Pea Ridge to the state line so can visit often and remind myself what a true “climb” is.

    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    What is your career field if you don't mind me asking. Salaries here very all over the place for quite a few different careers.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Law enforcement. Last summer we stayed in the area a month and a half while on baby leave so I did some research and discovered I’d take almost a 60% cut in pay so we decided to wait on the whole idea lol. Where I am at now our agency has a great relationship with the community and their support and thus we are compensated well above other agencies. So that is a blessing that is hard to leave.

  29. #129
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    I don't know dude. Go do your own Google research if you want. As stated by others, one area can gain while others lose, but overall, it's a fact that the state is losing.....at least losing people who are "documented".


    .
    I dunno. California is a large diverse state. There is ghetto california (Fresno, Bakersfield, Stockton, etc) and then there is the Bay area, L.A. and San Diego. Taking aggregate data can be pretty misleading.

    I can believe that people leave California because I am one of them. But I didn't leave because it sucked. I left because of work. The cost of living in non-ghetto California is pretty high too.

    But all else equal, I'd love to move back. If you told me that I had a job in San Diego that can cover the cost of living, it would take me less than one second to make that move.

    I've lived in the Midwest (IL, OH, IN) and in the South (NC) and for quality of life, California just blows those places away.

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    The problem with a lot of these so-called mtb towns is what does the community offer other than good riding? What about medical care, shopping, entertainment, and so on? To me, that means living near a city with a population of at least 80,000 to get these amenities.

  31. #131
    bikes don't have motors
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    The problem with a lot of these so-called mtb towns is what does the community offer other than good riding? What about medical care, shopping, entertainment, and so on? To me, that means living near a city with a population of at least 80,000 to get these amenities.




    Agreed. I'll add weather as well. Excessive rain, humidity, snow. All deal breakers for me. And if your state bird is an insect, count that one out as well.

  32. #132
    aka Manzanita Tom
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Agreed. I'll add weather as well. Excessive rain, humidity, snow. All deal breakers for me. And if your state bird is an insect, count that one out as well.
    Weather = big Yes! Moved to SF Bay Area 12 years ago from upper Midwest, where I’ve lived in various places. Besides the crazy beautiful scenery and parks here, the biggest difference really comes down to what I call ‘usable days.’

    Wisconsin, IL, Michigan - it’s either butt ass cold, pissing with rain, or so stinky hot and humid all you want to do is hibernate. Then there’s like 2-4 weeks when none of that’s happening - they call it summer- and you pretty much have to jam a year’s worth of living into a month.

    No thanks. I’m good. I really don’t need 3000sf anyways - my 1500 Sf rancher with the laundry in the garage does just fine, even at four times the price. For a solid six months we don’t even bother checking the weather before we make plans to something outside. And for the other six months any given day can be about as perfect as a day can be, no matter what month it is.

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    The problem with a lot of these so-called mtb towns is what does the community offer other than good riding? What about medical care, shopping, entertainment, and so on? To me, that means living near a city with a population of at least 80,000 to get these amenities.
    Which is exactly what you get in Bentonville/Bella Vista.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  34. #134
    mtbr member
    Reputation: k2rider1964's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,917
    Quote Originally Posted by tammin View Post
    Weather = big Yes! Moved to SF Bay Area 12 years ago from upper Midwest, where I’ve lived in various places. Besides the crazy beautiful scenery and parks here, the biggest difference really comes down to what I call ‘usable days.’
    Living in OC or San Diego my whole life, it's makes me smile to see folks in the SF Bay areas think they have great weather.

    People probably aren't mentioning Bend because it's already been overblown and Californianized....high rental rates, silly housing prices, TRAFFIC, fu-fu restaurants and a trail system that's kinda 'meh' if you ask me. I get bored there in a week as so many of the trails are similar.
    2018 Intense Tracer
    2017 Intense Primer
    2016 Santa Cruz 5010

  35. #135
    bikes don't have motors
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    Which is exactly what you get in Bentonville/Bella Vista.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk



    A monthly average humidity of 70% too.

  36. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    A monthly average humidity of 70% too.
    Which is below the national average and in no way tells the story of how it is perceived either.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  37. #137
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Agreed. I'll add weather as well. Excessive rain, humidity, snow. All deal breakers for me. And if your state bird is an insect, count that one out as well.
    I grew up in upstate NY. I used to say we had 5 seasons, the 5th being black fly season.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  38. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porkchop_Power's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    237
    The number of usable riding days (say above 30 degrees, not raining or snowing, and below 80 and no humidity) is what is driving people to Colorado. In the front range you are looking at 300+ days nice enough to ride (even if you have to hop on the road bike or gravel bike or go higher up to avoid heat). Places further south like Salida can easily top 330 days. No humidity except during rain and zero issues with bugs. I have lived in the Northeast and if you get 150 nice days you are lucky. This of course has led to high housing prices like California.

  39. #139
    bikes don't have motors
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    Which is below the national average and in no way tells the story of how it is perceived either.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk




    Bull, 70% average, day after day, month after month, every month. You must be in the employ of the chamber of commerce. Ar. also rates #5 for the worst summer weather.

  40. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Bull, 70% average, day after day, month after month, every month. You must be in the employ of the chamber of commerce. Ar. also rates #5 for the worst summer weather.
    I didn't disagree with you. However, it is below the national average and is not perceived as muggy here as it would be elsewhere. It seems to escape your simplistic understanding but the level itself does not solely speak to how it is felt.

    Most of Arkansas is also a river valley, swamp, or river delta all of which do not apply to this area.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  41. #141
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,186
    I'm not mad at all about people dogging Phoenix.
    The less people here the better; but let's be real. It has a favorable cost of living, no lack of jobs, and despite being a MAJOR use urban area, I have literally 10 major trail systems within 30 minutes drive (15-25 miles) from my house.
    Sonoran Preserve North+ Cave Creek
    Sonoran Preserve South
    Lake Pleasant trails
    White Tanks
    Estrella Mtn.
    FINS/Pirate trails
    Trail 100/Dreamy Draw/North Mtn park
    Brown's Ranch
    the southern 1/3 of the BCT
    Western edge of McDowells (GateWay/Lost Dog)

    Maricopa trail passes as close as 20 minutes from my door.

    Some state land we call "playgrounds" with 18-20 miles of secret handshake trails is 15 minutes away.
    There's also some hiking parks that allow bikes if I need a shakedown ride:
    Deem Hills
    Thunderbird Park

    In total I have easily 300 miles of trail with a half hour in the car.
    If I can drive another 10-20 minutes I can add in 3 more trail systems:
    South Mountain
    Pemberton
    Skyline Park

    On a Sunday when traffic is light, Gold Canyon and Hawes are an hour, and it's literally the other side of PHX.

    In 90 minutes I can be in Sedona, Prescott, or Payson.

    Tucson and Flag are 2 hours away.
    Yeah, 2 hours isn't something you do on a whim, but it's the *other friggin side of the state, and vastly different than PHX.

    There's a few weeks here in summer that are brutal. but it's rather short in comparison to the 9+ months of good, great and stellar weather we enjoy otherwise. I rode today, it was low 70s when I started at 8am, and low 80s at 11:30 when I got done. I got home and went swimming in my 80 degree pool, it was 90F outside. This weekend the forecast is in the 80's.

    There actually isn't that much of the year that truly lives up to the "deathly hot even at midnight" fable. Very few people actually get up and ride at 4am. In the peak of summer I hit the trail at 5am, and can ride until 9-10am. Thats about the time it pushes solidly into the triple digits and the sun is getting intense. You can easily get back out on the trail at 6:30-7pm.


    But by all means, Keep spreading the word: AZ sucks, stay away.
    Don’t modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  42. #142
    used to be RipRoar
    Reputation: TraxFactory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Posts
    2,087
    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    People have been fleeing CA from at least as far back as I can remember. Wasn't Bend referred to some time ago not-so-lovingly as "Ben Diego?"
    It is funny, most people I meet are not originally from CA in the first place, very few in fact. What is it that those other Californicated states are complaining about? The influx of money and perhaps gentrification.

    It is no different right here in our own backyard. Look at SF for example, Mission District, Third Street, Bayshore....

    The people leaving with moola just seem better at managing their finances and taking advantage of a good thing. I wouldn't, mind doing some cashing out myself.

  43. #143
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    2,080
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Bull, 70% average, day after day, month after month, every month. You must be in the employ of the chamber of commerce. Ar. also rates #5 for the worst summer weather.
    Are you talking about average humidity throughout the entire day when you say "day after day"? Cause humidity often goes up to 100% at night, that's how you get dew on the grass. So it might drop to 40% during the day to get your average of 70%.

    The flip side of high humidity is that the temperature does not vary as much throughout the day. Coming from the midwest, that's something I never got used to in dry Flagstaff. Go out with friends at dinner time in a t-shirt and by last call you need a down parka. I had many frigidly cold rides down out of those hills after sundown. Dressing/packing for a 30-degree temperature swing during your ride is not easy.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  44. #144
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    28,908
    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    There's a few weeks here in summer that are brutal. but it's rather short in comparison to the 9+ months of good, great and stellar weather we enjoy otherwise. I rode today, it was low 70s when I started at 8am, and low 80s at 11:30 when I got done. I got home and went swimming in my 80 degree pool, it was 90F outside. This weekend the forecast is in the 80's.
    A few weeks in the summer? I just checked weather.gov and it's 98°F tomorrow!

    Holy hell.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  45. #145
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmmUT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,339
    Quote Originally Posted by PornstarRyan View Post
    I'd vote for Grand Junction. GJ puts you close to lots of local trails and also gives you access to many of the best MTB trails in the country within a two hour drive. Plus no traffic and practically year-round riding (even if the summer is a little toasty).
    I second this one. I grew up all over Colorado and we'd always bag on GJ (it's very industrial and redneck) but compared to just about anywhere else in Colorado it's cheap. Plus you are close to Fruita. And can take day trips to Green River, Moab, Summit County...plus the world largest country music festival!

  46. #146
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,952
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Agreed. I actually feel kind of sad for people who've never lived anywhere except the same county in which they were born. There's a huge world out there.
    It's called visiting and being a tourist? One doesn't have to quit your jobs, uproot the family, change schools and leave all the extended family to appreciate going somewhere else. Being single? Much easier. I have traveled some, doesn't mean I want to move there. NYC and FL ? Not for me. Lived in Eastern MA my whole life, no desire to leave.

  47. #147
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porkchop_Power's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    237
    I have been to Phoenix numerous times (always in the spring).

    There are some awesome trails around and it is cheap, BUT:

    - It is a huge city and there is absolutely no way to bike or walk around. Everything involves a long drive. You may live near one of the trail systems but everything else would be like an hour drive. There are barely any sidewalks once you get away from the main areas.

    - I have rode some awesome trails in March / April. But even by 10 AM in March it was pushing high 80's, just way too hot for me. The months of May through October are downright dangerous even early in the day.

    I don't know how it can be considered a mountain bike town. Its a great town to go to a resort in the Spring or fall but that is about it. For someone like me who likes to be outside all times of day and walk or bike to where I want to go I could never make it work.

  48. #148
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    I have literally 10 major trail systems within 30 minutes drive (15-25 miles) from my house.
    Having to drive to a trail-head is not a selling point, and pretty much disqualifies anyplace as being an "mtb town" imho.

    I've probably gotten in my car to ride my bike less than five times in the last decade.



    .

  49. #149
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Phoenix has a lot of good riding but with 4.5M population I don’t think you can call it a town.

  50. #150
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    It's called visiting and being a tourist? One doesn't have to quit your jobs, uproot the family, change schools and leave all the extended family to appreciate going somewhere else. Being single? Much easier. I have traveled some, doesn't mean I want to move there. NYC and FL ? Not for me. Lived in Eastern MA my whole life, no desire to leave.
    There's still time left. It's never too late to broaden one's horizons.

  51. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    468
    I moved to Knoxville, TN from Southern California. The cost of living is a tiny fraction, the air is clean, no traffic, houses are available for $100k on huge property, and it has amazing cycling network five minutes from downtown. I won't be going back.

  52. #152
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    People probably aren't mentioning Bend because it's already been overblown and Californianized....high rental rates, silly housing prices, TRAFFIC, fu-fu restaurants and a trail system that's kinda 'meh' if you ask me. I get bored there in a week as so many of the trails are similar.
    Let's go line-by-line:
    • High rental rates: yes. Finding anything to rent at any price is a challenge.
    • Silly housing prices: I suppose so. Transplants from the Bay area and Seattle comment on how inexpensive houses are here but if you are wanting to move from rural Idaho it'd be sticker shock. We're waiting for our kids to move out and our house value to break $1M in a few years then might cash out and retire elsewhere.
    • Traffic: Horrible on certain routes at certain times but a far cry from a true big city like SF or Seattle. Knowing local traffic patterns helps since there's almost always an alternate route that flows well. You'd have to be a resident to know those patterns though.
    • Fu-fu restaurants: a good thing. Food choices beyond Olive Garden and Applebees is a plus. Food is expensive in general though. When I travel and think that ski resort meals and airport meals seem cheap, that tells me that I've been paying too much at home. Pints are now $6.50. Hamburgers are $14+.
    • Meh trails: Yeah, a lot of it is B grade, but there is a lot of it and it keeps growing. There are some really fun trails that I still like a lot so I head that direction. The trails everywhere I've ever lived has gotten to be same-old same-old eventually.


    As far as being a place where one might want to raise a family though, Bend is pretty nice as long as you have adequate income and housing.

  53. #153
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Living in OC or San Diego my whole life, it's makes me smile to see folks in the SF Bay areas think they have great weather.
    Unless you live very near the coast, it can get very hot in SoCal; too hot for me. Winters are nicer though.

  54. #154
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    2,080
    Nat, its called being part of a community. Having a sense of place. Having friends and family close, and knowing many other community members is a great way to live.

    Certainly people need to travel, especially internationally, to see the world and get to know and their fellow citizens of the world. But you don't need to move your home to do that.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  55. #155
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,186
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    A few weeks in the summer? I just checked weather.gov and it's 98°F tomorrow!

    Holy hell.
    Meh. It *might* get to 98 at the airport, where they pull the official data from. It'll be 5-8 degrees cooler than that at virtually every trailhead.
    Tomorrow is an anomaly. It's flirting with record highs, and its only 2 days before it returns to 'average' or actually a little below average at 80-85 deg highs.
    It'll also be at like 3pm. By 5pm, the sun is setting and it's cooling off nicely. It also won't crack into the 90's until probably 1pm.


    Shrug. Not everyone digs Phoenix. Like everything else in life, thats alright. I could have chosen to live basically anywhere with my profession. I chose Phoenix. I'll take extra water and deal with 110F 8 days a week vs 4 layers of clothes and snowpacked (or closed) trails.



    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Having to drive to a trail-head is not a selling point, and pretty much disqualifies anyplace as being an "mtb town" imho.

    I've probably gotten in my car to ride my bike less than five times in the last decade.
    driving is required because of the neighborhood I chose. There are plenty of houses that allow for driveway to dirt in PHX.

    I would actually say, of my riding group I'm in the minority that I can't pedal out my garage.
    Of the 15 or so trail systems I listed in my first post, all but 3 (White Tanks, Estrella, Lake Pleasant) have housing communities within 1 mile of trail access.
    Don’t modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  56. #156
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    Nat, its called being part of a community. Having a sense of place. Having friends and family close, and knowing many other community members is a great way to live.

    Certainly people need to travel, especially internationally, to see the world and get to know and their fellow citizens of the world. But you don't need to move your home to do that.
    You can find a community anywhere you live, and spending a few days in a place is not the same as living there for years.

  57. #157
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,952
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    There's still time left. It's never too late to broaden one's horizons.
    Or not. North of Boston guy. Can pedal all day to trails right at the end of my driveway. In several directions. Humid south? Not, " Awesome" desert? No thanks. Not quite the low cost of living. There is something to be said for world class hospitals and education system, 45 minutes form the beach and 2 hrs to skiing. YRMV.

  58. #158
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,737
    Knoxville does seem like a cool spot. Haven't been there in years. Awesome climbing and great people in Tennessee too. One thing that keeps me west of the continental devide is access to open space. The ability to just get myself out in the middle of nowhere with little effort is very satisfying.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  59. #159
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SingleSpeedSteven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    The Californication of Colorado is real. People are fleeing CA in droves, and when they sell their 2 bdrm rancher for $1M+, paying cash for a $400K house in paradise is like hitting the lottery for them.


    .
    This couldn't be more true. I am from California, moved to the midwest when I was a kid but still spent summers out there with family. In 2005 my wife and I moved to Denver and after fighting tooth and nail for decent jobs out there, we eventually decided to come back to the midwest. Since 2005 Denver alone has changed so much that I barely recognize it. It's actually really sad. I used to drive to Breckenridge to snowboard with some buddies that lived up there, and the majority of the population was millennials trying to hack it up high so they could be close to the resorts, and mountain hippies. Now it's a giant mess of Audi's with SWorks road bikes on top.

    It's sad, I remember we tried to take a family camping trip before we moved out of California and ended up driving home late at night because the campsites were full. Colorado is quickly becoming the same way.

  60. #160
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pitdaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    155
    There is no "one size fits all". Cost of living isn't the same for everyone. You might be retired, have a medical condition or be living mortgage free. However, this is a great place to share things.

    Meanwhile, I'm counting my blessings. Within 15 minutes of my house are 3 trail systems. Thirty minutes away are at least 3 more. Then there is "the other side of town" and even the urban core has a couple. Unfortunately, it's hard to ride year round in the Kansas City area.

  61. #161
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Or not. North of Boston guy. Can pedal all day to trails right at the end of my driveway. In several directions. Humid south? Not, " Awesome" desert? No thanks. Not quite the low cost of living. There is something to be said for world class hospitals and education system, 45 minutes form the beach and 2 hrs to skiing. YRMV.

    Well, okay then. It appears you have everything you could ever want and you're happy.

  62. #162
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    28,908
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Knoxville does seem like a cool spot. Haven't been there in years. Awesome climbing and great people in Tennessee too. One thing that keeps me west of the continental devide is access to open space. The ability to just get myself out in the middle of nowhere with little effort is very satisfying.
    That's one of my biggest beefs with Texas (there are many others though). Everything is owned by someone and you have to pay to use someone's privately-owned land, all of the riding areas are compressed into tiny little spots and it's basically the complete opposite of what you stated, driving hours to get to some little ranch that someone makes you pay to ride or the stuff closer to the cities that is well, in the cities.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  63. #163
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    28,908
    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    Meh. It *might* get to 98 at the airport, where they pull the official data from. It'll be 5-8 degrees cooler than that at virtually every trailhead.
    Tomorrow is an anomaly. It's flirting with record highs, and its only 2 days before it returns to 'average' or actually a little below average at 80-85 deg highs.
    It'll also be at like 3pm. By 5pm, the sun is setting and it's cooling off nicely. It also won't crack into the 90's until probably 1pm.


    Shrug. Not everyone digs Phoenix. Like everything else in life, thats alright. I could have chosen to live basically anywhere with my profession. I chose Phoenix. I'll take extra water and deal with 110F 8 days a week vs 4 layers of clothes and snowpacked (or closed) trails.





    driving is required because of the neighborhood I chose. There are plenty of houses that allow for driveway to dirt in PHX.

    I would actually say, of my riding group I'm in the minority that I can't pedal out my garage.
    Of the 15 or so trail systems I listed in my first post, all but 3 (White Tanks, Estrella, Lake Pleasant) have housing communities within 1 mile of trail access.
    Apart from the near 100 temps this week, it dips to just above 80 on Friday, then it's back into the 90s for Sunday and Monday, so yeah, it's an extreme environment. I've been there, gotten the (wet) t-shirt, played the game. The lack of cover and abundance of light colored rock reflects a lot of radiation back on you and in the light it can be pretty hard to deal with, your brain is literally boiling in your head and people still die that are fit and hydrated. As you know, many people get rescued and a few die due to exercising in the summer there. It's an extreme environment for most riders and getting into the 80s-90s is not much fun for me, you sweat like a dog (even in dry Arizona) and generally pretty miserable. If you love it and ride it, congrats. It's no more "year round" than where I live in Alaska, where it's in the 50s now, but the 14 hours of sunlight (and growing) makes the temp feel a lot warmer, since the surface and buildings are baking in the sun all day. Dealing with our cold in winter is not for everything though, we like to say there is no wrong weather, just wrong clothing, but just like riding in 100+ temps and dealing with having to wake up at 4am on the weekends, it's not for everyone and it's an extreme environment to deal with.

    The thing that I don't agree with is sugarcoating it or misrepresenting it. I know how hot it can be and how it doesn't get below 100 until long in the night and the trend in some spots seems to be not even getting below that during the hottest times at night. I also know that riding at night in those temps is much more do-able and you feel a lot better. Just like us in the winter, you get used to a lot of night-riding, which is fun in it's own right.

    Lots of people move to Phoenix to stay indoors most of the time, but if you like to get outdoors and are there for more than just the winter, it's an extreme environment and my hat is off to you for getting out in the summer and dealing with it. If you are used to more moderate climates, AZ has those too, but most people think AZ=Phoenix, when there is so much more like Show Low, The Rim, Payson, Prescott, Flagstaff, Williams, and other little amazing pockets.

    Don't put on 4 layers in the cold, that's the newbie mistake, most people over-dress the core and are miserable. I tell you though, it's hard waking up at 9am on the weekend so I can ride when the sun is up and it's warming up, and then hit the brewery on the way back home. Terrible I tell ya
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  64. #164
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,737
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    That's one of my biggest beefs with Texas (there are many others though). Everything is owned by someone and you have to pay to use someone's privately-owned land, all of the riding areas are compressed into tiny little spots and it's basically the complete opposite of what you stated, driving hours to get to some little ranch that someone makes you pay to ride or the stuff closer to the cities that is well, in the cities.
    I did a month long road trip through Texas in 2003 with my girlfriend. State really runs the gamut of both people and environments. A lot of the small towns were something out of a movie that time forgot many years ago. Lots of boarded up store fronts with nobody around as well. Big Bend on the other hand was phenomenal. Clearest night sky I have ever experienced bar none. Definately wouldn't want to live there. Mountains are my jam.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  65. #165
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Well, what do you know. Of the top 100 place to live, #2 is also one of the top mountain bike towns (arguably #1 imho).

    https://realestate.usnews.com/real-e...live-in-the-us


    .

  66. #166
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    9,854
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Lots of people move to Phoenix to stay indoors most of the time, but if you like to get outdoors and are there for more than just the winter, it's an extreme environment and my hat is off to you for getting out in the summer and dealing with it. If you are used to more moderate climates, AZ has those too, but most people think AZ=Phoenix, when there is so much more like Show Low, The Rim, Payson, Prescott, Flagstaff, Williams, and other little amazing pockets.

    I agree that the Sonaran Desert is an extreme environment but that's a good thing IMO, Phoenix is a blight that has ruined a good chunk of it but if the climate were more moderate the damage would be much worse.

    Prescott, Flagstaff, etc. are nice but they don't have the Sonaran Desert which is one of the crown jewels of the SW. Lots of people enjoy "extreme" environments, I'm sure you can relate
    I brake for stinkbugs

  67. #167
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    31,623
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Well, what do you know. Of the top 100 place to live, #2 is also one of the top mountain bike towns (arguably #1 imho).

    https://realestate.usnews.com/real-e...live-in-the-us


    .
    Although I’d say #2 should be in there, a large percentage of that list I laugh at.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  68. #168
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    5,756
    Listen/read carefully all the above posts (except from that randombiker dude). Do NOT think about moving to Phoenix. The sun is hot and the rocks are big and sharp. Now, I’m off to ride SoMo, which I do year-round.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  69. #169
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Well, what do you know. Of the top 100 place to live, #2 is also one of the top mountain bike towns (arguably #1 imho).

    https://realestate.usnews.com/real-e...live-in-the-us


    .
    Coincidentally (or not), #5 on that list is also part of the Northwest Arkansas metroplex.

  70. #170
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,390
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    A few weeks in the summer? I just checked weather.gov and it's 98°F tomorrow!

    Holy hell.
    Yeah and it will be back to 74 on Thursday and friday. And I have ride planned for 6:15 today and I ride yesterday in 95F temps in the late afternoon. I did not die and it was fun. That was on the way home from work and drive by that place every day.

    But yeah it too extreme for most people to ride. Too rough, too many trails, never an off season. It wears you down. Most can't handle it.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  71. #171
    Click Click Click
    Reputation: dirtbyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,566
    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Too rough, too many trails, never an off season. It wears you down. Most can't handle it.
    Yeah, seems like just about the time I get sick of the summer night rides, it is "winter" and perfect for riding during the day, and about the time I am sick of the winter it is time for more summer night rides. Gets exhausting, and just as soon as I think I have ridden all of the trails in town, they freaking build more. Ugh! I can't keep up. I need to move or take up golf.
    "You either want to or you don't."

  72. #172
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbyte View Post
    Yeah, seems like just about the time I get sick of the summer night rides, it is "winter" and perfect for riding during the day, and about the time I am sick of the winter it is time for more summer night rides. Gets exhausting, and just as soon as I think I have ridden all of the trails in town, they freaking build more. Ugh! I can't keep up. I need to move or take up golf.
    Interesting. It's virtually always 50-60 degrees when I ride, year round. Early morning in the summer, late afternoon in the winter, mid-day in the spring and fall....and there are green trees all around every day of the year.

    I seriously don't know how you guys handle it, but to each their own.

  73. #173
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    I used to enjoy riding year-'round but I've come to enjoy having a legit winter. We have a major ski resort right up the road so I take a break from biking.

  74. #174
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    31,623
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Interesting. It's virtually always 50-60 degrees when I ride, year round. Early morning in the summer, late afternoon in the winter, mid-day in the spring and fall....and there are green trees all around every day of the year.

    I seriously don't know how you guys handle it, but to each their own.
    Many don’t understand the temps. on the Front Range. I try to keep it on the downlow to diminish the already huge influx of migrators.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  75. #175
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,737
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    I used to enjoy riding year-'round but I've come to enjoy having a legit winter. We have a major ski resort right up the road so I take a break from biking.
    Ditto that. Hobbies to the seasons keeps it fresh and interesting. Fresh tracks in the backcountry are glorious. Bout an hour to the Ocean is pretty sweet too.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  76. #176
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,209
    Quote Originally Posted by Porkchop_Power View Post
    ... Please also realize that the percent of local population with college degrees is tiny in these places as compared to a major city so these jobs make sense...
    I don't know the current demographics, but when I lived in Summit County (Breck, Keystone, etc) in the late 80's and early 90's we had the highest average level of education per capita of any US county. Almost every one of my ski techs had at least an undergraduate degree and several had advanced degrees. We had a nuclear physicist, a couple of engineers, and a lawyer tuning and renting skis in our shops. Many well-educated folks were opting to take blue collar jobs in order to enjoy the resort lifestyle. Most were young and eventually moved on to pursue their professional careers, but I would imagine that new folks would be coming in and filling their shoes.

  77. #177
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,392
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Many don’t understand the temps. on the Front Range. I try to keep it on the downlow to diminish the already huge influx of migrators.
    I prefer to ride at 3pm when it’s 95 and the UV index is dialed up to 10 or 11. Why? Because I won’t see a soul at Lory or HTMP. I’ve done rides on Saturdays in the summer where the only people I see are the drunks in their boats on the reservoir.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  78. #178
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,390
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Interesting. It's virtually always 50-60 degrees when I ride, year round. Early morning in the summer, late afternoon in the winter, mid-day in the spring and fall....and there are green trees all around every day of the year.

    I seriously don't know how you guys handle it, but to each their own.
    Most guys can't.. and for dirtbyte if it is under 70 he breaks out the arm warmers and under 60 is full cold weather gear. As for last evening's ride. Yeah it was 100F in Phx, but we survived 23 miles and 2200ft of climbing. Again most simply can't handle it. That is ok with us.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  79. #179
    aka Manzanita Tom
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    86
    Anyone care to weigh in with their vote for an international location, same or similar criteria? Near the ocean and a decent-sized airport. Lots of usable days. Great riding tracks nearby. Low housing cost. Low cost of living. Ideally Italy, maybe Spain or Portugal.

  80. #180
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Most guys can't.. and for dirtbyte if it is under 70 he breaks out the arm warmers and under 60 is full cold weather gear. As for last evening's ride. Yeah it was 100F in Phx, but we survived 23 miles and 2200ft of climbing. Again most simply can't handle it. That is ok with us.
    Dude, you're hilarious.

  81. #181
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    245
    How about:

    South: near Boone, N.C. - plenty of rural inexpensive towns
    Midwest: Marquette, MI - maybe more expensive than the rest of U.P. - but that’s like being the tallest midget. 😁
    West: in/around Kellogg, ID - not quite discovered yet....but will be soon.

  82. #182
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    9,854
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Riding in those conditions don't make you a tough guy, it makes you a masochist. I ride my bike for fun. Pretty green trees, birds singing, and pleasant temperatures make it all the more enjoyable. Why anyone would choose to ride on the blistering heat of a brown, dead desert is beyond.

    What MTB town has the lowest cost of living?-6a2a3067129b75610cef0acc33d8c28c.jpg


    Yep, brown and dead. Zero wildlife. No one should go there
    I brake for stinkbugs

  83. #183
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    Coincidentally (or not), #5 on that list is also part of the Northwest Arkansas metroplex.
    Most people see Arkansas and can't get past various assumptions/stereotypes, as evidenced further up. Also, the way the metroplex is laid out is a bit unusual with there not being a big central nucleus so that confuses them as well.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  84. #184
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    2,080
    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    Most people see Arkansas and can't get past various assumptions/stereotypes, as evidenced further up. Also, the way the metroplex is laid out is a bit unusual with there not being a big central nucleus so that confuses them as well.
    I haven't said anything about Bentonville because I'm not sure how to express my mild displeasure for the area. My wife has family there, so I've been down there three times for family get-togethers. I get a real yuppy vibe from the place, its like Boulder with big hair and deep-fried everything. There is a lot of suburban sprawl with ENORMOUS, ugly, wasteful houses. Maybe since the cost of living is relatively low, you can have the average person in a 5000 sq ft house, I don't know. But what's the point?

    Its beautiful country. There are reasonable homes here and there. The trail development going on there is very interesting, the moderate number of trails they have now are pretty good and there are plans for a lot more. Personally, I like the climate. And admittedly, maybe its just my progressive values clashing with the hypocritical "christian" southern culture. But that place just doesn't feel right. Downtown Bentonville feels like Pleasantville, it lacks the character and small-businesses I like to see in a "mountain bike town".

    Its not an outdoors-persons culture. At least in an over-priced mountain town people are hiking the trails in their Patagonia and Prada gear. So I think that rules it out as a "mountain bike town".

    I'm not saying I'm right on this, just my $.02.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  85. #185
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pitdaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    155
    Bentonville changed when Uncle Jed, I mean Sam Walton struck gold. If you were in that area 30 years ago it was totally different. Just the change from the 80's to 90's was enormous! The mountain bike scene is all thanks to one of Sam's kids. As a youngster we used to pass through there on 71 highway. I'm glad it brought modern luxuries to that place. Just annoyed at all the traffic on my way south. Timing is everything. Bentonville & Belle Vista aren't a true representative of what Arkansas is.

    As for biking there are other places to ride- check out Ouachita Natural Forest

    Arkansas does have a good climate. Yes, they have humidity. It takes getting used to. But like Phoenix, you just ride early or late. Cost of living really is inexpensive. Finding a job could be a challenge depending on what you want or are willing to settle for including wage.

    One thing I just love about Arkansas and many of the southeast states is the hospitality!

    PS- my parents were both born in Arkansas and yes, I like to go bare foot.

  86. #186
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I haven't said anything about Bentonville because I'm not sure how to express my mild displeasure for the area. My wife has family there, so I've been down there three times for family get-togethers. I get a real yuppy vibe from the place, its like Boulder with big hair and deep-fried everything. There is a lot of suburban sprawl with ENORMOUS, ugly, wasteful houses. Maybe since the cost of living is relatively low, you can have the average person in a 5000 sq ft house, I don't know. But what's the point?

    Its beautiful country. There are reasonable homes here and there. The trail development going on there is very interesting, the moderate number of trails they have now are pretty good and there are plans for a lot more. Personally, I like the climate. And admittedly, maybe its just my progressive values clashing with the hypocritical "christian" southern culture. But that place just doesn't feel right. Downtown Bentonville feels like Pleasantville, it lacks the character and small-businesses I like to see in a "mountain bike town".

    Its not an outdoors-persons culture. At least in an over-priced mountain town people are hiking the trails in their Patagonia and Prada gear. So I think that rules it out as a "mountain bike town".

    I'm not saying I'm right on this, just my $.02.
    Your criticism of Bentonville is actually extremely valid and shared by many residents of the greater NWA region. It's certainly improving as the Waltons (and various think tanks and subsidiaries of the Waltons) are also spending a lot of money on trying to create a more vibrant culture in downtown as well (building lots of downtown housing, drinking establishments, restaurants, etc..). That being said, it still has a somewhat manufactured feel to it. I always call if Field of Dreams, in that they've built it... and people are coming. It just hasn't been established long enough to develop a truly interesting culture.

    That's why I, and a lot of other people, live in Fayetteville which is where the University of Arkansas is located. It has much more of a "funky" vibe and also has its own set of quality trails (though not nearly as many as the Bentonville/BV area, which is only a 25 minute drive away, I would still argue that Mt. Kessler, in Fayetteville, is one of the best trail networks in the whole state with the best history behind it). Fayetteville has the feel of an outdoor town with a pretty serious outdoor culture constantly fueled by the influx of college kids.

  87. #187
    Click Click Click
    Reputation: dirtbyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,566
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    Dude, you're hilarious.
    Yes he is, he is also right. PERFECT riding conditions for us on Tuesday night.
    "You either want to or you don't."

  88. #188
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbyte View Post
    Yes he is, he is also right. PERFECT riding conditions for us on Tuesday night.
    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself.


    .

  89. #189
    Click Click Click
    Reputation: dirtbyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,566
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself.


    .
    Just for reference... This is what night riding (we started at 6:30pm - was light out for the first 30-40 minutes of the ride) looks like on a day that hit 100 degrees... Average temp on the ride was 73 degrees. So unbearable.

    What MTB town has the lowest cost of living?-capture.jpg
    "You either want to or you don't."

  90. #190
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,390
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    I'm glad you enjoyed yourself.


    .
    Something tells me you think we are crazy. But it was perfect conditions. In fact eating dinner after the ride outside I had to turn off the fans. It was getting too cold.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  91. #191
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,669
    When you live in AZ your body gets used to the heat. The first year there I was miserable. By the third year I wasn’t as bothered by the heat. I have a theory that your body grows more capillaries in the skin to shed heat. When Arizonans visit colder climes they wear down jackets when it’s 60F.

  92. #192
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Something tells me you think we are crazy.
    No, I think you're just a bunch of goobs on bicycles, just like the rest of us. There's nothing crazy, or bad ass, or special about riding a bicycle with your buddies on a decidedly average suburban trail.


    .

  93. #193
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    813
    One of my favorite things to do when on business travel in Scottsdale is to hike up Camelback and hit the peak just before sunrise. It's never been unbearably hot that time of morning, even in the middle of summer. Finding a parking spot can be a challenge, though.
    ¯\(°_o)/¯

  94. #194
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I haven't said anything about Bentonville because I'm not sure how to express my mild displeasure for the area. My wife has family there, so I've been down there three times for family get-togethers. I get a real yuppy vibe from the place, its like Boulder with big hair and deep-fried everything. There is a lot of suburban sprawl with ENORMOUS, ugly, wasteful houses. Maybe since the cost of living is relatively low, you can have the average person in a 5000 sq ft house, I don't know. But what's the point?

    Its beautiful country. There are reasonable homes here and there. The trail development going on there is very interesting, the moderate number of trails they have now are pretty good and there are plans for a lot more. Personally, I like the climate. And admittedly, maybe its just my progressive values clashing with the hypocritical "christian" southern culture. But that place just doesn't feel right. Downtown Bentonville feels like Pleasantville, it lacks the character and small-businesses I like to see in a "mountain bike town".

    Its not an outdoors-persons culture. At least in an over-priced mountain town people are hiking the trails in their Patagonia and Prada gear. So I think that rules it out as a "mountain bike town".

    I'm not saying I'm right on this, just my $.02.
    Bentonville proper I can see how you might form that opinion. When was the last time you visited? There are quite a few small businesses downtown now. The one thing you have to keep in mind is that Bentonville really isn't just Bentonville when people speak about it in terms of biking. You pick up Rogers, Bella Vista, Springdale, Fayetteville and all the other small towns (it's a 25 minute drive from Bella Vista to Fayetteville, the two furthest points from each other). I would however say that this area has an outdoor culture. Everyone I know uses the natural surface trails at least semi-regularly. Add in easy access to world class fishing, some of the best freshwater diving in the US, rock climbing, etc. and you have a large number of people doing outdoor activities.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  95. #195
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    2,080
    I want to say it was 2016, and we stayed in Rodgers. Only visited Bentonville for the trails.

    I'd be really interested in suggestions for good trails within riding distance of the east side of Rodgers. I'm sure we'll be back soon.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  96. #196
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I want to say it was 2016, and we stayed in Rodgers. Only visited Bentonville for the trails.

    I'd be really interested in suggestions for good trails within riding distance of the east side of Rodgers. I'm sure we'll be back soon.
    Other than the Railyard and Lake Atalanta there isn't anything within riding distance there. Rogers is definitely where I would go for breweries and food but is a novelty for trails.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  97. #197
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    31,623
    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    One of my favorite things to do when on business travel in Scottsdale is to hike up Camelback and hit the peak just before sunrise. It's never been unbearably hot that time of morning, even in the middle of summer. Finding a parking spot can be a challenge, though.
    It’s always nice escaping SoCal to get away from the crowds.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  98. #198
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    5,756
    Quote Originally Posted by _CJ View Post
    No, I think you're just a bunch of goobs on bicycles, just like the rest of us. There's nothing crazy, or bad ass, or special about riding a bicycle with your buddies on a decidedly average suburban trail.


    .
    Jeez, you really are something of a jerk, huh? Maybe you’re more fun in person.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  99. #199
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    31,623
    This thread:

    Right turn Clyde.

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  100. #200
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    membership renounced
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Jeez, you really are something of a jerk, huh? Maybe you’re more fun in person.
    Nope.


    .

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. lowest entry cost GPS for Strava
    By head in forum GPS, HRM and Bike Computer
    Replies: 90
    Last Post: 07-14-2014, 03:16 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-23-2013, 03:47 PM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-29-2013, 09:31 PM
  4. Lowest Cost with...
    By maxkimber in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-20-2011, 12:19 AM
  5. Replies: 42
    Last Post: 07-11-2011, 11:26 PM

Members who have read this thread: 616

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.