Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Chris Bling
    Reputation: dustyduke22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,001

    What goes into gaining access to Wilderness designated lands?

    Hey everyone,

    I posted this up on the Trail Building forum, but wanted to also post it here to reach a larger audience. Any thoughts or feedback would be great.

    To start off, I am almost positive that getting a Wilderness area changed into a Non-Motorized area is next to impossible. Where I live, there are some amazing hiking trails in Wilderness area, but that does not help me or anyone else in the area who would love to explore the back country on our bikes.

    I am just wondering if anyone has any type of insight, success story, or a simple answer to see if this is a fight that is already over before it began.
    The obsession of wheels fused with the passion of cycling
    Affordable Custom Wheels

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mizzaboom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    319
    I don't have any personal experience with this, but I know a few guys in my area that tried to gain access wilderness-designated trails (National Forest land) and were not successful. Now they just ride them anyway and hope they don't get caught...which most likely isn't helping the situation either. I've never ridden up there but have hiked some of the trails they talk about. Very rugged riding on very old/poorly designed hiking trails which just doesn't appeal to me.
    2011 Trance x1

    All good things in all good time

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,638
    Once Congress designated lands as Wilderness they are that way forever ,or until somebody pays them off.

  4. #4
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,196
    Here's a start:
    https://www.facebook.com/WildernessB?fref=ts

    This group is trying to get designated wilderness legal for bikes...

    I am currently working with others (who are MUCH smarter than myself) in getting the PCT opened to MTB's.

    One bit of very recent good news is that the USFS has officially recognized MTB's a 'Semi Primitive non-motorized' form of travel that is in line with the Trails System Act of 1968.

    Sounds dumb, but this does have an impact on a federal level when discussing low impact, environmentally friendly and a non-interfering mode of recreation.

    Here is the decision from the USFS that outlines this for the CDNST:
    http://a123.g.akamai.net/7/123/11558...T3_1424409.pdf

    Here's 1 nice quote of many in that decision:
    FSM 2353.42 directs the “nature and purposes of CDNST are to provide for high-quality scenic
    primitive hiking and horseback riding opportunities and to conserve natural, historic and cultural
    resources along the corridor.” Effects on scenic, natural, historic and cultural qualities have
    been addressed in the EA. No significant differences in effects have been described for any of
    the action alternatives that would indicate that a substantial interference with the nature and
    purposes of The Act has occurred through the inclusion of bikes.

    It is a VERY informative and positive read for MTB access. The USFS debunks MANY of the standard HOHA arguments.


    I give it around a decade before the Big-W opens up to bikes (IMO)...currently the big-W rules ban any 'mechanized' use - that needs to change.
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
    http://www.sharingthepct.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/SharingThePct

  5. #5
    Chris Bling
    Reputation: dustyduke22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,001
    I guess the next question is, What can the average MTBer do to help move this work along?
    The obsession of wheels fused with the passion of cycling
    Affordable Custom Wheels

  6. #6
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,196
    Quote Originally Posted by dustyduke22 View Post
    I guess the next question is, What can the average MTBer do to help move this work along?

    I'd start with IMBA
    What is IMBA's Wilderness Strategy?

    IMBA believes mountain biking, a low-impact, muscle-powered recreation, is an appropriate trail use on public lands and is consistent with the values of Wilderness land protection, which includes recreation in natural landscapes.

    When proposed Wilderness Areas include significant mountain biking opportunities, IMBA pursues boundary adjustments and alternative land designations that protect natural areas while preserving bicycle access. IMBA can support new Wilderness designations where they don't close singletrack bicycling opportunities.

    IMBA mobilizes and leads its grassroots network to participate in local negotiations over Wilderness lands expansion. It is essential that IMBA, cycling clubs and individuals speak strongly for mountain biking in the early stages of Wilderness discussions. Through education, outreach, community building, partnerships and media relations, mountain bikers can influence and support appropriate land protection bills, including Wilderness.
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
    http://www.sharingthepct.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/SharingThePct

Similar Threads

  1. Getting a Wilderness designation changed to Non-Motorized access
    By dustyduke22 in forum Trail Building and Advocacy
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-02-2013, 09:03 PM
  2. Replies: 45
    Last Post: 09-28-2012, 11:26 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-02-2012, 10:57 PM
  4. Pa State Game Lands Designated Routes for Bicycles
    By NEPMTBA in forum Pennsylvania
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-11-2012, 05:15 PM
  5. Gaining weight..
    By redmr2_man in forum Ibis
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-09-2011, 04:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •