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  1. #1
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    New question here. What do you use to lock up your bike?

    I'm sure there are plenty of you here who, when not on the trails, ride around town and need to lock up your bike. What would you guys suggest? What do you use? I just bought a new bike and need something I can easily keep with me to keep my investment safe!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by LavaPunk
    I'm sure there are plenty of you here who, when not on the trails, ride around town and need to lock up your bike. What would you guys suggest? What do you use? I just bought a new bike and need something I can easily keep with me to keep my investment safe!
    Long heavy cable that wraps through both wheels , seat rails , front and rear triangles with a good lock by Kryptonite.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  3. #3
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    Get a Kryptonite lock!

    Quote Originally Posted by LavaPunk
    I'm sure there are plenty of you here who, when not on the trails, ride around town and need to lock up your bike. What would you guys suggest? What do you use? I just bought a new bike and need something I can easily keep with me to keep my investment safe!
    Good that you are concerned with protecting your new investment! As much as I don't like leaving my bike alone in town, if I do have to go, I take 2 different locks with me. 1 Kryptonite new york "noose" chain (www.kryptonite.com) which I use for the main frame and rear wheel, and one seperate combination lock for the front wheel and lock that to the frame. Instead of leaving my bike out of view, I look for an area that is open, well lit and with regular pedestrian traffic, so that bike thieves have a hard time trying to bust the lock in full public view. Also, if you have a QR seatpost, remove that and take it with you.

    Hope this helps,

    Cohiba

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by LavaPunk
    I'm sure there are plenty of you here who, when not on the trails, ride around town and need to lock up your bike. What would you guys suggest? What do you use? I just bought a new bike and need something I can easily keep with me to keep my investment safe!
    My advise and proven by many bikers:
    NEVER ever buy a lock for your expensive bike. If a thief wants your bike he's taking it even though you have used 3 Kryptonite locks (or something alike). Only use locks for less expensive bikes. By not buying a lock for your expensive bike you force yourself not to leave your bike somewhere in public. If you have an expensive bike ALWAYS have an eye on it in public........never let it out of sight. And ALWAYS take the bike into your appartment.

    For cummuting use a cheap bike.

    Lucas

  5. #5
    My bike was -TWO- Wheels!
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    I just put a cheep cable around my triangle and front rim, my rear rim is a ***** to get out so I figure no one will get that out. But my main lock is me, usually when I go inside, its not for more than 15mins, if longer, im usually with someoen else. and we ha two locks to make a huge web of cable. Also, I usually lock it up right in plain sight, no jidig it, thats stupid.
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  6. #6
    Dr. Porkenheimer
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    My lock

    Let me preface this by agreeing with the others: the safest and most secure plan is to never let your bike out of your sight, or stored (locked to an immovable object) in your home. At home I have an eyebolt secured to a stud in my garage. The bikes are on a wall-mounted rack, then cable-locked to the eyebolt (see attached pic of Kryptonite cable lock). When I'm riding around town, I use the Kryptonite chain and lock pictured below.
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  7. #7
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    i leave my bike outside in the middle of philly for 8 hours a day. my one piece of advise is..... just don't rely on a U-lock....

    thieves can crack those real quick with a small car-jack!

    now i use a kryptonite new york chain (with it's own lock) and a u-lock (around the front wheel to double it up!!!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bykhed
    Let me preface this by agreeing with the others: the safest and most secure plan is to never let your bike out of your sight, or stored (locked to an immovable object) in your home. At home I have an eyebolt secured to a stud in my garage. The bikes are on a wall-mounted rack, then cable-locked to the eyebolt (see attached pic of Kryptonite cable lock). When I'm riding around town, I use the Kryptonite chain and lock pictured below.
    This can be one-uped. You need 2 I-bolts , because 1 can be spun out. Place 2 as far apart as possible.

    I also use 2 cables by kryptonite. One with the lock built in and one w/ loops on either end to wind through the tid bits. Its got 2 bikes ( 4 wheels, 2 main tri , 2 rear tri , 1 dual clamp fork , and rack.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  9. #9
    thats my red stapler
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    Quote Originally Posted by LavaPunk
    I'm sure there are plenty of you here who, when not on the trails, ride around town and need to lock up your bike. What would you guys suggest? What do you use? I just bought a new bike and need something I can easily keep with me to keep my investment safe!

    my front door ..i dont ever leave my bike anywhere unattended its even a rare occasion that ill put my bike in the truck and run into a store.

    where do you guys live that you lock you bikes up IN your houses???
    [SIZE=2]when the going gets tough the world gets reduced to one pedal stroke at a time[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeManiac
    My advise and proven by many bikers:
    NEVER ever buy a lock for your expensive bike. If a thief wants your bike he's taking it even though you have used 3 Kryptonite locks (or something alike). Only use locks for less expensive bikes. By not buying a lock for your expensive bike you force yourself not to leave your bike somewhere in public. If you have an expensive bike ALWAYS have an eye on it in public........never let it out of sight. And ALWAYS take the bike into your appartment.

    For cummuting use a cheap bike.

    Lucas
    Thats what I was gonna say..best bet buy a very cheap bike to ride around town..if your locking up a bike like a titus, turner, SC or any other expensive bike..your asking for it... bike theif is like a car theif if they want it - they will get it

  11. #11
    Dr. Porkenheimer
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    Can't spin

    Quote Originally Posted by Evel Knievel
    This can be one-uped. You need 2 I-bolts , because 1 can be spun out. Place 2 as far apart as possible.

    I also use 2 cables by kryptonite. One with the lock built in and one w/ loops on either end to wind through the tid bits. Its got 2 bikes ( 4 wheels, 2 main tri , 2 rear tri , 1 dual clamp fork , and rack.
    I don't have a pic to post, but the bikes are on a wall-mounted rack - lock goes through the rack, eyebolt and bikes, so the bikes can't be spun around. And it's mounted pretty high on the wall. Besides, can you imagine rotating two bikes in the air, including a 35-lb. freeride monster?

  12. #12
    Your disco is weak!
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    ... agree with above post... U locks, despite its image, seems fairly easy prey for theives... The kryptonite NY fuggetaboudit lock seems to be as good as it gets. I've been doing alot of inquiring about locks lately and have yet to see 1 account of a busted or picked fuggetaboudit. The downside is that the lock weights nearly 9 lbs.
    [SIZE=1]* Disclaimer: The author of the above post is not liable for his views and opinions... especially when written under the influence of beer.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cohiba
    Good that you are concerned with protecting your new investment! As much as I don't like leaving my bike alone in town, if I do have to go, I take 2 different locks with me. 1 Kryptonite new york "noose" chain (www.kryptonite.com) which I use for the main frame and rear wheel, and one seperate combination lock for the front wheel and lock that to the frame. Instead of leaving my bike out of view, I look for an area that is open, well lit and with regular pedestrian traffic, so that bike thieves have a hard time trying to bust the lock in full public view. Also, if you have a QR seatpost, remove that and take it with you.

    Hope this helps,

    Cohiba
    Kryptonite says that the "noose" short version allows a bike to be locked up with less chain length. This might be a stupid question but I can't visualize how the noose version functions in a way that allows effective lock up on a 2'3" chain versus the standard 3'3" chain. I've been looking for some sort of bike lock for quick stops or when grabbing a bite to eat. The noose version weighs a little less.

  14. #14
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    Theres nothing worse than stopping at a convenience store for directions while your bike is attached to a rear rack on your car and getting your seatpost stolen by some jackass stoner looking for a laugh. Ive also heard of someones front wheel getting stolen. I would be so pissed, especially if it had my disc rotor on it or if the rim was expensive. When i travel, i keep the seatpost in the car and lock the front and back wheels to the frame, just in case.

  15. #15
    I already rode that
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    Ride a cheapie bike around town as others said.
    I used a U lock and a cable lock to lock mine up. Both worked good I guess but the krypto got cut through when I left it overnight on my front porch
    I never leave my good bike locked up anywhere because I dont take it anywhere that I need to lock it up Id rather take the transit or car.

  16. #16
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    a garage.

    out side of that, my bike never leaves my sight.
    "What would happen to the Weather Channel's ratings if people werent scared anymore?"

  17. #17
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    My bike is like my child. I'd never leave it locked up somewhere. I remember back in the old days, people used to wrap their nice frames in electrical tape so people wouldn't know it was a good bike...

    When I was in college the school cops used to go around with some super cold liquid (liquid nitrogen?) and spray it on U-locks of illegally parked bikes. They'd then just tap the locks with a hammer to break them and impoud the bikes. It took about 2 minutes.
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  18. #18
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    Well the Kryptonite New York chain looks pretty beefy. I think we all realize nothing is completely safe but it's still nice to have a deterrent for short trips into stores. Anyone else have experience with these?

  19. #19
    Who are the brain police?
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    Nothing. A determined thief will not be deterred. I just dont leave it anywhere. If I thought Id need to lock it somewhere Id take a beater bike.
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  20. #20
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    Yeah I think we're getting the point. In fact I think it's being beat into our skulls with a mallet. If possible it'd be nice to actually hear from people who DO lock their bikes up since that's what this thread is about.

  21. #21
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    You can leave a nice bike locked up to an immovable object in a highly visible place in daytime and be OK most places. You should definitely use a New York Chain or a Forgeddaboudit, they are super tough to break because they must be cut twice or more (each side of a link) to get it open. Don't use cables--any cable, no matter how thick, is very easy to cut with even a small set of cable cutters. U-locks are pretty weak considering the weight and expense. A heavy duty chain is the best option. Any time a thief has to break 2 locks or cut twice, your bike is a lot less attractive. My chain is easy to carry, I just have it slung right over my shoulder on top of my messenger bag strap--it's comfortable and quick to use that way. Plus, a big chain can be used to defend yourself or possibly even beat down a dirty bike thief
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  22. #22
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    Take it with you

    Quote Originally Posted by BikeManiac
    My advise and proven by many bikers:
    NEVER ever buy a lock for your expensive bike. If a thief wants your bike he's taking it even though you have used 3 Kryptonite locks (or something alike). Only use locks for less expensive bikes. By not buying a lock for your expensive bike you force yourself not to leave your bike somewhere in public. If you have an expensive bike ALWAYS have an eye on it in public........never let it out of sight. And ALWAYS take the bike into your appartment.

    For cummuting use a cheap bike.

    Lucas
    I have had two bikes stolen and now I dont leave my new bike out of sight. It stays in my apartment at night and I take it indoors no matter where I go. Whether it is 7eleven, chapters, bike shop, library, and anywhere else. If someone does not let my bike in with me I dont go in. There is no ultimate locks. If you lock a nice bike up outside eventually it will get stolen. A good bike thief will get through any lock and make himself look inconspicuous when doing so. What is the point of carrying around ten lbs of Kryptonite whatever? If the thief cant get the whole bike they will just get the handlebars, grips, crankset etc. Dont kid yourself. If you have to commute buy a beater and lock it up if you want. This is the only solution that I know of.

  23. #23
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    The best answer...

    Quote Originally Posted by LavaPunk
    What would you guys suggest?
    who better to ask than the bike messengers of new york city? (www.nymba.com/faq/question3.htm)

    1. Hermes: "In New York you'll need a lock that can lock your bike to a variety of objects as you never know what you're going to find to lock your bike to. Most experienced messengers use a chain of some sort with a very strong padlock, as this is, although heavy, the best, most versatile choice. A U-Lock will probably work, but simply has a higher chance of getting the bike stolen. In New York a lock is absolutely essential. In many other cities a messenger can simply lock the front wheel to the frame and lean it up against a wall (if they lock it at all). In New York if the bike isn't locked TO SOMETHING it will be gone. Sometimes the thing it was locked to will also be gone. Sometimes parts of the bike will be gone. One should be advised against becoming very attached to one's bike in New York."



    2. TONE: " Heheheh... This is a good question which I could probably hold a seminar on. Where shall I start. GET A KRYPTONITE three foot quad chain! Most bike shops have them for about $80 for messengers. If you know where to go, you can get them for $60. With the kryptonite chain usually comes a small horseshoe lock. I don't recommend using this. Sell the lock to a rookie, a non messenger, or a motorcyclist who can use it on their disc brake, WHATEVER. Buy an "American" lock or a "Multi-Lock". These are most popular among NYC messengers because they are relatively cheap ($20-$30) and versatile. Here are some pros and cons to various locks I know of (straight from the thieves guild!).

    American lock: They are relatively cheap. They can be left open while still having the chain wrapped around your waist for fast lock up. The keys are short and strong. The key plate is an hour glass shape which prevents drill bits from turning because they get caught up... however from what I have heard it can be broken into with a flathead screwdriver. A person can jam a flathead between the keyhole cylinder and the hourglass shaped plate and wedge the plate up. Apparently the pin, which holds the plate down, isn't all that. Once the plate is popped out the same screwdriver can be jammed into the keyhole cylinder and wrenched around until the cylinder itself becomes detached within or something. The result is the horseshoe bolt where your kryptonite chain is held just slides right out. The thief gets your bike and a free kryptonite chain. Of course if someone has bolt cutters a thief can cut right through the horseshoe bolt. Some thieves carry cut off bolt cutters and a pair of steel pipes. With this they can slip everything into a standard back pack. When they want to cut a lock they simply slide the pipes on either end of the cut off clipper's handles and then they once again have the leverage to snap right through your lock and ride away with your bike.

    Multi-Loc(k): Pretty much the same as the American lock except it is rectangular in shape. Another interesting feature of this lock is that the body of the lock extends to somewhat cover the sides of the horseshoe bolt of the lock. When the lock is closed with your kryptonite chain on it the extensions from the body of the lock create an obstacle to bolt cutters because the clippers can't get the right angle on the bolt of the lock. This doesn't stop the thief from cutting the actual chain, but most thieves would prefer to cut the lock and keep a free chain to sell. Multi-Locs also have the hourglass keyhole cylinder plate to prevent drilling and I think they can be kept unlocked like the American lock while wrapped around the waist for quick lock up.

    St. Pierre lock: These use to be issued with Kryptonite chains. They were slightly rectangular and triangular in shape. These are probably the BEST locks to use with a kryptonite chain. There's one MAJOR problem with them though. The keys are cheaply made. They can't take the abuse of a typical NYC messenger's lock up needs. All the pumping in and out as well as the turning with the key done by a NYC messenger eventually causes the keys to break especially during the winter when the cold weather makes the keys more brittle. I went through a number of keys. Luckily a few times I was able to get the broken part of the key out. Another time I couldn't get the broken key out and even two locksmiths couldn't get into the lock. I ended up riding around with two locks on my chain, one a "St. Pierre" and the other a "Master Lock". I haven't seen a St. Pierre in a while though, so they may have disappeared all together.

    Kryptonite mini horseshoe locks: These are/were standard issue with Kryptonite chains. When Kryptonite first started to change from St. Pierre locks to their own locks the locks were ok except for two factors. The cylindrical keys, which, granted are incredibly hard to pick the locks of, would wear down with the typical NYC messenger's usage. In particular a little metal knob on the key which guided it into the lock to align it with the tumblers and keep the key in the chamber while turning would break off. This made the lock practically useless. I also heard rumors from numerous sources that if you hit the lock at a specific position with a hammer or other directed heavy object it would jolt the locking pin/mechanism enough to bounce it and enable the horseshoe bolt to open up without a key. For a while I haven't heard about this, but I have also heard from numerous sources that Kryptonite redesigned their lock. I have also heard that since the redesign about 20% of the locks jam up and won't open.. sometimes with the chain wrapped around a bike or a person's waist and even with the key stuck in the lock itself. One messenger I know was forced to slide the whole chain off his waist and had to cut through the lock bolt with a hacksaw, so that he could still use the chain. Luckily he didn't lock the chain too tight in the first place.

    Kryptonite Quad Chain: It's heavy like any other three foot chain, but the square link design (quad chain) makes it harder for bolt cutters to get a good angle on the chain. Just like a krypto chain is essential for an NYC messenger so are bolt cutters to an NYC thief. Quad chains force a bolt cutter's blade to put pressure down on at least one corner of a chain link. A thief risks denting the blade of his cutters by trying to clip a quad chain. I have found that Krypto Quad Chains are most comfortably held around the waist. This way if you do have to rumble with a driver you don't have to fumble with your chain either in your bag or wrapped around your bike's frame. Another advantage of the chain is that you can lock up to more than just a thin pole. You can also lock up multiple bikes and even use the chain for other uses.

    Standard U-lock: These are the easiest for a thief to break through. Basically a metal pole, a 2x4, or any crowbar can be slid between the bike frame and the pole within the "U" then wrenched/levered until the lock is twisted around and popped right off. It takes less than a minute for anyone to get through these. Recently I have heard of one particular brand of U-lock, which is more resistant to theft. A source of mine told me when attempting to crank the lock off with a metal pipe the U-lock kept twisting around. It ended up looking like a pretzel, but the bike was still there. I'm sorry to say I do not know the brand name of this lock, but apparently the metals used in this lock are more malleable and flexible which makes them resistant to the cranking technique of U-lock theft. In this case instead of your lock popping off the U just keeps twisting. I don't know how resistant to bolt cutters this lock would be, but I imagine the U would be thicker than a standard chain link. One great thing about U-locks is that they are light and easy to carry.. particularly in the rear pocket. I still wouldn't recommend them for NYC messengers though.

    Euro Locks: I have no idea what the names of these locks are, but that's what I call them because they are popular in Europe where apparently thieves don't exist. These locks are actually mounted on the bike frame around where the breaks would be and are shaped like a "C". Inside there is a bolt which rotates or flips out of the "C" and goes through your wheel to the other side of the lock. This locks the wheel so no one can ride off with your bike. This of course does not prevent a thief from carrying a bike away, and in New York it is just too easy to get lost in a crowd or walk around a corner, etc. Don't bother with these locks. They are cute and useful only in Europe.

    So after this course you should understand just about all the ins and outs of bike locks for New York City. Again to simplify things.. just buy a krypto quad chain and an American or Multi lock. If you are worried about the hourglass cylinder plate being screw driven out then just check the plate occasionally for looseness. It might just be that the plates get loose which allows the thief to get the flathead under the plate.
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  24. #24
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    beat this into your skull

    Quote Originally Posted by dissonance
    Yeah I think we're getting the point. In fact I think it's being beat into our skulls with a mallet. If possible it'd be nice to actually hear from people who DO lock their bikes up since that's what this thread is about.
    I think that the opinions from most people come from experience including myself. To leave a nice bike locked up with whatever unbreakable device is the flavor of the day is silly. You are just asking for trouble. This is why people are saying dont lock your nice bike up and leave it unattended for long periods. It is different if you are a messenger and depend on your nice ride for a living. My girlfriend and I both have cheap ass commuter bikes that we ride and lock up if we are going to be indoors for a extended periods. People who have learned the hard way dont lock up their mtbs outside for obvious reasons. It does not matter what the newest NYC unbreakable lock you are using because there will be some loser that has figured out a way to cut through it.

  25. #25
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    I had a rather good experience with my bike earlier this summer at a camping trip. I use a kryptonite 'NY chain w/ EV disc lock' and a 'kryptoflex 7' cable' together to secure my bike.

    Anyway, the trip consisted of white water canoeing one day and biking the next, the problem was that no-one would be at the camp while we were out on the water. The group decided to lock the bikes to the welded on brush guard frame of one guys truck. I had offered to lock two other bikes with mine, but was declined, both had faith in their own locks, a kryptonite basic u-lock and the other a thick generic chain and pad-lock. Both quoted 'if the thief wants your bike, he's going to take it regardless'. The other bikes were locked together with someone elses' u-lock and various chains. Mine, a Jeckyl and the most expensive of the bunch, being one of two full suspension bikes. End of the day, my bike was the only one left, they attempted to get through the chain and the mini u-lock but couldn't, it looks like they tried mine first and the chain took a chunk out of their cutters as the other cut chains had a groove in the metal.

    I was allowed to do an 'I told you so dance' but declined. Normally around town I will use just the chain if I will be away for a minute or two, any longer and I use both.

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