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  1. #1
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    New question here. What can be done in an emergency when there is no cell phone???

    I like to ride trails on my own. But where I ride there is no cell phone coverage.
    What advice do people have in case of an emergency?
    How should I prepare for an emergency?
    What should I do if I have a major crash and can not ride or walk out of the forrest?
    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Really you just have to deal with the situation as/if it happens. You won't be able to plan for everything. Maybe get a SPOT if you're really worried.

    I've crashed, got knocked and awaken to being able to see my knee cap before. The best I could do was use my jersey as a bandage and ride out to my car then drive till I could get cell reception then call for a ride to the hospital. Ended up with some stiches and a concussion. All in all I'd rather just deal with it when it happens then worry about every time I ride.

  4. #4
    Flow like water
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    Quote Originally Posted by dochou View Post
    I like to ride trails on my own. But where I ride there is no cell phone coverage.
    What advice do people have in case of an emergency?
    How should I prepare for an emergency?
    What should I do if I have a major crash and can not ride or walk out of the forrest?
    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.
    The traditional way of dealing with emergencies in wilderness is to:
    1. Die.
    2. Rely on Luck.
    3. Be prepared for anything.
    4. Travel in a group.

    Relative to cell phones, I have rarely had cell coverage in wilderness areas. I do take one when traveling solo. I hope that I or someone I meet on the trail can hike to a tall ridge to seek cell signal. If you are seriously concerned about safety, do not travel solo.

  5. #5
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    i don't ride alone in large places for long periods of time. i usually just do the smaller loop trails by my house when i'm just going for a ride by myself. we have cell coverage here though.

  6. #6
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    I strongly recommend a book call "98.6 degrees: The art of keeping your ass alive" by Cody Lundin. It was recommend on here and after reading about halfway through so far I can see why.

    I try to pack for the worst every time, from Greenways to wilderness...you get used to the minor extra weight, plus if something goes down you know what you have and are prepared. I usually add a few extra things for the longer more desolate locations though.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
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    Be prepared
    Inform an adult of where you're riding, route, and what time to expect you back
    DO NOT DEVIATE FROM PLANNED ROUTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ( it's that 1/2 mile of extra credit that will kill you!)
    Let the person you told know you got back to your vehicle (that is if that's how you got to your riding location).

  8. #8
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    I think you can get an app (gps related) via Google that someone else can track where you are via their phone or on a computer.

    I've heard SPOT isn't too bad.

    As I ride occasionally on a trail that has no coverage, here's what I do: (remember I worry way too much and being a girl makes you a little more cautious)

    Always let someone know when you leave and call when you get back so that person knows you aren't dead.

    As for preparing, make sure you have plenty of water and food of sorts in case you get stuck somewhere or have to walk for a long distance or for the heat. Have stuff for flats and other bike related things that could go wrong like a multi-tool and some band-aids.

    Wear loud clothing so if you do end up crashing you'll be easily seen. Get a whistle as well.

    I also keep my asthma inhaler with me and a windproof/waterproof jacket. After my accident last spring I now keep a change of clothing in the car.

    Do what works for you. The more you stuff in your pack, the heavier it gets so keep it basic.

  9. #9
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    A basic first aid kit is a good idea. You want to stop bleeding, immobilize a break, etc. Improvisation can make all the difference if you ever need first aid.

    Technology can and will fail. Get a compass and learn on how to use it. Practice with it so you have confidence that it works.

    I look up the major roads that surround the riding area. You can take a straight line out if you have to. It helps to have a compass and an understanding of the area. I have done this more than a few times, usually because I was pushed for time.

    Theres a lot more to being totally comfortable.

    You could get a signal mirror , whistle, etc

  10. #10
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    Aside from all the first aid stuff, do take your cell phone with you because the signal it sends out can be used to locate you especially if it has GPS.

    Also, always have a whistle with you whenever you are out in the wilds. If you are injured to the point where you cannot move, you can blow the whistle repeatedly to attract attention.

    Last, and most important, ALWAYS make sure that someone knows EXACTLY where you are going and HOW LONG you expect to be there.

    Be careful.

  11. #11
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    Whatever happened to self reliance?

    Or common sense?

    Have these things all been replaced by electro-nannies?

    Most of the places I ride don't have cell phone coverage. This is good because then you don't have to stop while people make or take a quick call.

    Total buzz kill.

    As others have said, make sure someone else knows where you went and when you should come back.

    Mix in a little first aid knowledge and a small kit and a dash of self restraint when alone or in a remote area and live a little.

    If all of these things should fail there's always crawling out on bloody stumps.

    If the bloody stumps fail, there is always dying, alone and cold in the dark.

    One of the best things about this sport is the remote and faraway places you get to go,
    being tethered to the "virtual" world does not enhance that experience.

    Your results will of course, vary.

    jummo

  12. #12
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    My SPOT goes everywhere with me if I know I will be out of cell coverage. I also keep it in the plane when I'm flying in AK. Works good up that far north, even on the North Slope. I usually modify the messages based on the activity (flying, hiking, biking, hunting, etc.).

    Spot

    Flying has been a little slow lately, so not much activity.
    Pivot Mach 5.7c
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  13. #13
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    Depends on the emergency I would assume.

  14. #14
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    NEVER EVER rely completely on electronics.
    If you aren't prepared for an emergency, chances are you'll be in trouble when everything goes wrong. And even if you have all the necessary items, if you don't know how to use them (like a compass, for instance), you'll be in even bigger trouble.
    In a survival situation, the first thing you want to do is to calm down (DO NOT PANIC), and assess the scenario - what materials do you have? How far do you think you are from rescue/human contact? Etc.
    You must now improvise with what you have and can find.
    You need clean water, warmth (fire), shelter, and food. These are your priorities.
    Consider creating a survival kit.
    And always remember that your brain is your most critical survival tool. The will to survive is your best friend. Fear is your worst enemy.
    If I were you, I would take a few survival and orienteering classes (preferably not online, because you need field experience). It would also be wise to take a first-aid course.
    It helps a great deal to ride in a group or at least with another person.
    Improvise, adapt, and overcome.
    "Be prepared, not scared"
    ~Cody Lundin

    "What is stronger, fear or hope?"
    ~Lance Armstrong

  15. #15
    Plays with tools
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    You should have been a boy scout!

  16. #16
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    draft a text of rides and send it out before, ,,whistle, cd, don't be an idiot, all that other stuff

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jummo View Post
    Whatever happened to self reliance?

    Or common sense?

    Have these things all been replaced by electro-nannies?

    Most of the places I ride don't have cell phone coverage. This is good because then you don't have to stop while people make or take a quick call.

    Total buzz kill.

    As others have said, make sure someone else knows where you went and when you should come back.

    Mix in a little first aid knowledge and a small kit and a dash of self restraint when alone or in a remote area and live a little.

    If all of these things should fail there's always crawling out on bloody stumps.

    If the bloody stumps fail, there is always dying, alone and cold in the dark.

    One of the best things about this sport is the remote and faraway places you get to go,
    being tethered to the "virtual" world does not enhance that experience.

    Your results will of course, vary.

    jummo
    Thank you
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  18. #18
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    Bring a whistle. It's not heavy and doesn't need batteries.

  19. #19
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    I re-read the OP and have to admit I was a bit snarky in my reply.

    Actual advice is similar to what others have already said. Find the "10 essentials". Get them. This includes a whistle, basic compass, map, basic first aid, red flag, etc.. Most trails will have some people from time to time. With the basics, you can usually get some help in an emergency. Planning and thinking go a long way.

    Nature tends to favor the well-prepared. (Persian proverb, it is said.)

  20. #20
    No Stranger to danger....
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    SMOKE SIGNAL, like the Aboriginal or American indian style, this is a great method of attracting attention in a national park, just make sure you dont start a bush fire that your in the middle of thus causing you to get burnt alive.........
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  21. #21
    Weekend Warrior
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    If you need life saving service

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  22. #22
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    A rescue whistle might be something to consider bringing along.

  23. #23
    duh
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    flare gun, you can even use it to fend of the pesky wolves.

  24. #24
    @trailgrinder
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    Everyone is right on with the whistle, REI has some great lightweight kits that are nice but a good emergency blanket is super light and can help you get through the night and be used for a signal device in the day. Check this ten ounce kit out.

    Adventure Medical Kits UltraLight / Watertight .5 First-Aid Kit at REI.com

  25. #25
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    Never count on somebody else to bail you out.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

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