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  1. #1
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    New question here. What can be done in an emergency when there is no cell phone???

    I like to ride trails on my own. But where I ride there is no cell phone coverage.
    What advice do people have in case of an emergency?
    How should I prepare for an emergency?
    What should I do if I have a major crash and can not ride or walk out of the forrest?
    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Really you just have to deal with the situation as/if it happens. You won't be able to plan for everything. Maybe get a SPOT if you're really worried.

    I've crashed, got knocked and awaken to being able to see my knee cap before. The best I could do was use my jersey as a bandage and ride out to my car then drive till I could get cell reception then call for a ride to the hospital. Ended up with some stiches and a concussion. All in all I'd rather just deal with it when it happens then worry about every time I ride.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dochou View Post
    I like to ride trails on my own. But where I ride there is no cell phone coverage.
    What advice do people have in case of an emergency?
    How should I prepare for an emergency?
    What should I do if I have a major crash and can not ride or walk out of the forrest?
    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.
    The traditional way of dealing with emergencies in wilderness is to:
    1. Die.
    2. Rely on Luck.
    3. Be prepared for anything.
    4. Travel in a group.

    Relative to cell phones, I have rarely had cell coverage in wilderness areas. I do take one when traveling solo. I hope that I or someone I meet on the trail can hike to a tall ridge to seek cell signal. If you are seriously concerned about safety, do not travel solo.

  5. #5
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    i don't ride alone in large places for long periods of time. i usually just do the smaller loop trails by my house when i'm just going for a ride by myself. we have cell coverage here though.

  6. #6
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    I strongly recommend a book call "98.6 degrees: The art of keeping your ass alive" by Cody Lundin. It was recommend on here and after reading about halfway through so far I can see why.

    I try to pack for the worst every time, from Greenways to wilderness...you get used to the minor extra weight, plus if something goes down you know what you have and are prepared. I usually add a few extra things for the longer more desolate locations though.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
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    Be prepared
    Inform an adult of where you're riding, route, and what time to expect you back
    DO NOT DEVIATE FROM PLANNED ROUTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ( it's that 1/2 mile of extra credit that will kill you!)
    Let the person you told know you got back to your vehicle (that is if that's how you got to your riding location).

  8. #8
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    I think you can get an app (gps related) via Google that someone else can track where you are via their phone or on a computer.

    I've heard SPOT isn't too bad.

    As I ride occasionally on a trail that has no coverage, here's what I do: (remember I worry way too much and being a girl makes you a little more cautious)

    Always let someone know when you leave and call when you get back so that person knows you aren't dead.

    As for preparing, make sure you have plenty of water and food of sorts in case you get stuck somewhere or have to walk for a long distance or for the heat. Have stuff for flats and other bike related things that could go wrong like a multi-tool and some band-aids.

    Wear loud clothing so if you do end up crashing you'll be easily seen. Get a whistle as well.

    I also keep my asthma inhaler with me and a windproof/waterproof jacket. After my accident last spring I now keep a change of clothing in the car.

    Do what works for you. The more you stuff in your pack, the heavier it gets so keep it basic.

  9. #9
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    A basic first aid kit is a good idea. You want to stop bleeding, immobilize a break, etc. Improvisation can make all the difference if you ever need first aid.

    Technology can and will fail. Get a compass and learn on how to use it. Practice with it so you have confidence that it works.

    I look up the major roads that surround the riding area. You can take a straight line out if you have to. It helps to have a compass and an understanding of the area. I have done this more than a few times, usually because I was pushed for time.

    Theres a lot more to being totally comfortable.

    You could get a signal mirror , whistle, etc

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    Aside from all the first aid stuff, do take your cell phone with you because the signal it sends out can be used to locate you especially if it has GPS.

    Also, always have a whistle with you whenever you are out in the wilds. If you are injured to the point where you cannot move, you can blow the whistle repeatedly to attract attention.

    Last, and most important, ALWAYS make sure that someone knows EXACTLY where you are going and HOW LONG you expect to be there.

    Be careful.

  11. #11
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    Whatever happened to self reliance?

    Or common sense?

    Have these things all been replaced by electro-nannies?

    Most of the places I ride don't have cell phone coverage. This is good because then you don't have to stop while people make or take a quick call.

    Total buzz kill.

    As others have said, make sure someone else knows where you went and when you should come back.

    Mix in a little first aid knowledge and a small kit and a dash of self restraint when alone or in a remote area and live a little.

    If all of these things should fail there's always crawling out on bloody stumps.

    If the bloody stumps fail, there is always dying, alone and cold in the dark.

    One of the best things about this sport is the remote and faraway places you get to go,
    being tethered to the "virtual" world does not enhance that experience.

    Your results will of course, vary.

    jummo

  12. #12
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    My SPOT goes everywhere with me if I know I will be out of cell coverage. I also keep it in the plane when I'm flying in AK. Works good up that far north, even on the North Slope. I usually modify the messages based on the activity (flying, hiking, biking, hunting, etc.).

    Spot

    Flying has been a little slow lately, so not much activity.
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  13. #13
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    Depends on the emergency I would assume.

  14. #14
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    NEVER EVER rely completely on electronics.
    If you aren't prepared for an emergency, chances are you'll be in trouble when everything goes wrong. And even if you have all the necessary items, if you don't know how to use them (like a compass, for instance), you'll be in even bigger trouble.
    In a survival situation, the first thing you want to do is to calm down (DO NOT PANIC), and assess the scenario - what materials do you have? How far do you think you are from rescue/human contact? Etc.
    You must now improvise with what you have and can find.
    You need clean water, warmth (fire), shelter, and food. These are your priorities.
    Consider creating a survival kit.
    And always remember that your brain is your most critical survival tool. The will to survive is your best friend. Fear is your worst enemy.
    If I were you, I would take a few survival and orienteering classes (preferably not online, because you need field experience). It would also be wise to take a first-aid course.
    It helps a great deal to ride in a group or at least with another person.
    Improvise, adapt, and overcome.
    "Be prepared, not scared"
    ~Cody Lundin

    "What is stronger, fear or hope?"
    ~Lance Armstrong

  15. #15
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    You should have been a boy scout!

  16. #16
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    draft a text of rides and send it out before, ,,whistle, cd, don't be an idiot, all that other stuff

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jummo View Post
    Whatever happened to self reliance?

    Or common sense?

    Have these things all been replaced by electro-nannies?

    Most of the places I ride don't have cell phone coverage. This is good because then you don't have to stop while people make or take a quick call.

    Total buzz kill.

    As others have said, make sure someone else knows where you went and when you should come back.

    Mix in a little first aid knowledge and a small kit and a dash of self restraint when alone or in a remote area and live a little.

    If all of these things should fail there's always crawling out on bloody stumps.

    If the bloody stumps fail, there is always dying, alone and cold in the dark.

    One of the best things about this sport is the remote and faraway places you get to go,
    being tethered to the "virtual" world does not enhance that experience.

    Your results will of course, vary.

    jummo
    Thank you
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  18. #18
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    Bring a whistle. It's not heavy and doesn't need batteries.

  19. #19
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    I re-read the OP and have to admit I was a bit snarky in my reply.

    Actual advice is similar to what others have already said. Find the "10 essentials". Get them. This includes a whistle, basic compass, map, basic first aid, red flag, etc.. Most trails will have some people from time to time. With the basics, you can usually get some help in an emergency. Planning and thinking go a long way.

    Nature tends to favor the well-prepared. (Persian proverb, it is said.)

  20. #20
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    SMOKE SIGNAL, like the Aboriginal or American indian style, this is a great method of attracting attention in a national park, just make sure you dont start a bush fire that your in the middle of thus causing you to get burnt alive.........
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  21. #21
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    If you need life saving service

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  22. #22
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    A rescue whistle might be something to consider bringing along.

  23. #23
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    flare gun, you can even use it to fend of the pesky wolves.

  24. #24
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    Everyone is right on with the whistle, REI has some great lightweight kits that are nice but a good emergency blanket is super light and can help you get through the night and be used for a signal device in the day. Check this ten ounce kit out.

    Adventure Medical Kits UltraLight / Watertight .5 First-Aid Kit at REI.com

  25. #25
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    Never count on somebody else to bail you out.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  26. #26
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    Get some skills, and become more self sufficent. 20 years ago we all got along fine without cell phones...

  27. #27
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    I belve there is an international emergency number that links all mobile (cell) phones via satellite. It works where there is no cellular coverage. Trouble is I don't know the number.

  28. #28
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    In case of emergency with no cell coverage you should scream like a b*tch and pray another human hears you and not a predator. Maybe sasquatch will have a first aid kit.

    OR

    You can carry around one of those Life Alert devices lol
    Last edited by GiantMountainTroll; 09-02-2012 at 07:14 PM.
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

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  29. #29
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    I also ride solo 99 % of the time , some great advice here
    the Spot seems like a very good idea,
    I slow it down a few notches when riding in more
    remote areas, ya going fast on downhills and testing
    your skill is fun but save that for when riding with
    someone else or group rides.

  30. #30
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    Oh goody! A topic I really know something about!

    Here's the essentials...
    You need to maintain: a workable body temp, body hydration, structural integrity, and avoid excessive blood-letting, long enough to see you through until someone finds you or you extricate yourself out of the mess you're in.

    Body Temp: try to hang around the 98.6F/37C. Since you're riding trails near your home, you should be able to predict the weather fairly well... bring layers adequate enough for the worst conditions you may see whether you are there for an hour or all night long.

    I carry a spaceblanket along with handwarmer packets and my clothing.
    You can consider a firestarting kit for this as well, but be sure to know how to use your fire kit with limited tinder, limited limb function, shaking hands (from cold or shock).

    Keep your head, hands, and feet covered too.

    Body Hydration: You're probably doing this already, as most of us are. A means of treating water can be a plus if you are out in the bush/outback.

    Maintaining your body temp also works here as well. Too hot and you'll continue to sweat. Too cold and you'll shake/shiver, which burns energy, which comes from metabolizing fluids/solids.....

    Hydration is important to help keep your brain functioning well too... btw. Stay hydrated, but overhydration is not necessary.

    Be careful about ingesting anything that may cause you to puke or have diarrhea. You lose significant fluid this way too.

    Excessive Blood-Letting: Stop the bleeding, cleanse the wound, bandage the wound, support the wound.

    DO NOT... suture, staple, or even superglue wounds closed, unless you have been specifically trained to do so. That means with an actual lab component to your training, not just watching youtube or some SpecOps/UberMilitary/Ninja training DVD.
    The risk of infection runs high if you do. Infection can spread fast, and can kill or at least do some serious damage to your body and what's inside.


    Stop the bleeding by covering the wound with the cleanest material you have on hand. I like to carry a few 4x4 gauzes in my CB. You only need to make the first layer the cleanest, you can stick your dirty old socks on after that if that's all you have for absorbent bulk.
    It's nice if you can immobilize the wound site and the joints above and below. Not always possible or practical though.
    Elevate the wound above the level of your heart, again, if possible. Things like pressure points and tourniquets are best left to be learned in a class where you can actually practice them.

    Stopping the bleeding comes in two stages...
    1 - Initial intervention. You don't want to bleed out and die right then, so you stop the bleeding anyway you can.
    2 - You had to remove your initial dressing (the part of the "band-aid" that covers the wound) so you could gawk at your awesome skeletal structure, or to clean it out of the sticks, rocks, and other assorted goodies you picked up as you connected with whatever opened you up.

    Rinse with the cleanest available water you have. Unless you backwash like a bad septic system at summer camp (or you share your water with someone else's mouth and they backwash like that)... your CB or waterbottle water will probably be just fine. Oh... wait... I forgot... if you don't clean your CB often, but instead you pull the blue bag after a ride, hang it in the window so you can watch the cool little 'thingys' swimming around in it... you might reconsider using that water!

    Make every attempt to flush out all foreign objects. Pick these out if possible without rooting around with your dirty fingers/nails... Lord only knows where you've been sticking those fingers before your crash!
    A sandwich-size ziplock baggie, filled with water, jetted out through a tiny hole in one corner acts as a nice wound flushing tool. If you had your PB&J in there, be sure to turn the bag inside out first... wouldn't want crumbs in your wound, plus... you get to lick the jam and pb off the outside of the bag that way

    Butterfly "sutures" are the best wound closure for most folks. If you don't know what these are... google it?
    You can make them out of any tape. Take a strip, measure it into thirds by length. Then imagine thirds, side-to-side. In the middle third section, tear/cut from each side one third the way in. Make four of these cuts... two on each side.
    You should have two flaps in the middle of your tape now.
    Fold those in towards the middle, sticky side and you now have a skinny middle section that will not stick to the wound edges.
    Tape one end to one side of your wound, pull the tape across the wound until the edges are just closed, then press down the other end on the opposite side. Repeat as necessary until you have these little butterflies up and down your wound, holding it closed.

    These are not to stop the bleeding! Just holding the wound closed, approximating the edges.

    Cover your newly cleaned and taped wound with the cleanest available material. If bleeding persists.. add absorbent bulk if you have any. Not just your clothing... things like moss work too... depending on what kind it is and how long it is. Be creative... Martha and Rachael will just adore you!


    Structural Integrity Keeping bony parts aligned or if crooked beyond belief... in the position they are in if they do not compromise circulation. Splinting is something to be learned hands on in a class, although some folks may actually get the right idea from a book or vid. Practice it though! Spouses, girl/boy friends, siblings, kids, are great to practice on, just don't be all masochistic on them Dogs will actually put up with a fair amount of human hijinks... but do NOT attempt this on a cat! At least not on any cat I've ever known... or you'll be back to the bleeding thing...

    I carry a SAM splint in my CB for long rides that take me out into the boonies. I also carry one aluminum finger splint.

    If you are a diabetic... you KNOW what you should carry and do... so don't be messing up!
    If you are seriously allergic to insect stings, food products... you should also KNOW what you should be carrying and what to do in the event you are heading towards anaphylactic shock.
    Same thing with other body ailments.
    If you ride with someone else... be kind enough to let them in on your "little secret" and how to respond if you are going downhill fast. You should probably also work out any sort of concerning your gear and who it belongs to should you die... especially in big groups... keeps the fighting down and might prevent another medical emergency... just saying...

  31. #31
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    Part Doo... err... Deuz... awwww, more stuff!

    SIGNALING: Signals work principally by sound and sight.

    Sound...
    Yelling.. until your vocal chords shred into tiny frayed strands and you sound like Michael Jackson (with all due respect to the man... he didn't have that strong of a speaking voice)

    Whistle... now here's a good one! Acme, FOX40, and others are putting out multi-tone whistles specifically designed for emergency signaling. Get you one!

    Sight...
    Mirrors, lights, flares, bright-colored cloth.

    Considerations... light source for reflective materials, visibility - fog, smoke, vegetation, etc.

    There are some good, small, signal mirrors out there on the market, but you really should practice with them first. I take my students out and have them use a variety of reflective objects to signal a partner across a field on a sunny day. It's a real eye-opener to actually use one instead of just relying on what is put into survival manuals.

    Flares are good, just be careful of starting fires (which can be great for getting help... ala firecrews... but if you burn up it's a waste, also if you survive... the bill you receive might kill you!).

    Lights work well only if they are really bright and last long enough, and it's dark... duh!

    Any signal needs to tell your intended target that there is a person who needs assistance. The international signal is 3... flashes of a mirror, blasts on a whistle.
    Audible signals need to be made so the three sounds are distinguishable from each other.

    My GF just got here so I gotta go... but I'll close with this...

    The first thing you should do is create a plan for what you are going to do, illustrate that plan in a way so others may use it to find you, do not deviate from that plan unless you note that you might, then end the plan when the ride is over... calling someone, whatever.

    The person back at home you are hoping will miss you and call for a search party needs to understand these things...
    • When you are going, for how long, and when you should be considered "overdue"
    • Where you are going, any deviations you might take
    • What clothing you are wearing, what bike you are riding (colors, and other significant characteristics someone could identify you by)
    • What kind of emergency equipment you are taking, and any pertinent experience/training you have to handle emergencies


    Know how to navigate your way back home by the trail or off-trail, or just know how to get to the busiest path/road you can so you might come across additional help.

    BTW... not to toot my horn, but to let you know where I'm coming from... in addition to other things I've done in my life... I have been teaching wilderness survival since the 90's.

    There's more I could add, and undoubtedly there's more other's can add that will be of great value... I'm looking forward to seeing what people post!

  32. #32
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    Well from first hand experience I got busted up pretty good last weekend (collar bone, bunch of ribs) and to be honest I don't know if I could have gotten myself back on my feet had I been alone let alone done any first aid. I have done countless hours in Colorado back country alone this time I was rather close to road had to hike out one mile to were we could get a vehicle.

  33. #33
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    Start a fire... #1 it'll keep you warm, #2 it''ll discourage animals from coming near, #3 someone might see the smoke and phone it in to the authorities who'll come investigate to at the very least, think they'll get to ticket someone for starting a camp fire on crown/federal land without a permit or something.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  34. #34
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    lol.. i'm picturing a dude wrapped around a tree, pinned between his bike and some bushes on the side.... calling out in the most pathetic of tone, "help i've fallen and i can't get up!"

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight View Post
    Start a fire... #1 it'll keep you warm, #2 it''ll discourage animals from coming near, #3 someone might see the smoke and phone it in to the authorities who'll come investigate to at the very least, think they'll get to ticket someone for starting a camp fire on crown/federal land without a permit or something.
    You're assuming that the person either has matches or the necessary survival skills in order to create a fire without them.
    Most people don't know how to make a fire without matches.
    You are also assuming that the person is able to gather enough tinder, kindling, and fuel in order to create and sustain a fire.
    I'm certainly not saying that building a fire is a bad idea, but most people probably wouldn't be able to, and the situation would be worse if they were injured.
    Last edited by SpecializedWindsor; 09-03-2012 at 11:26 AM. Reason: typo
    "Be prepared, not scared"
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    ~Lance Armstrong

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    Get some skills, and become more self sufficent. 20 years ago we all got along fine without cell phones...
    this.

    im surprised it took 2 pages to get the smart response.
    If you arent bleeding, you arent riding hard enough.
    http://about.me/bigterry

    Quote Originally Posted by Hutch3637 View Post
    I don't need sex. My life fvcks me daily.

  37. #37
    Life is Short...Ride Hard
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    Get a Road ID and hope that someone comes by and sees you.

    Other than that, find a friend to ride with. I only ride solo on trails that are used often. Cause even with a road ID, someone needs to be there to call for help or hike/bike for help.

    Life is short... Ride Hard!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    This, I own one.

    Story goes my wife had to get air-evacuated via helicopter for a bad crash when she was out mountain biking alone. Luckily a hiker had came across her and was able to run to a spot for cell phone signal and dialed in the emergency crew.

    From then on we both carry the Spot if we are riding alone.
    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

  39. #39
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    From experience:

    Not only carry a map, but know where you are.

    We were 19 miles in to a 24 mile ride and one guy was feeling just awful. Flu or something. It was either 5 hard singletrack miles, or 1.5 road miles - as far as we could recall. ...if you turn the right way at the road crossing and if you turn the right way up the road.
    The turn in the road was not on the trail map.

    Us --->

    Fortunately, the situation was not dire, and we actually guessed correctly. But we concluded that in a real time-critical emergency we were ill-prepared to either find our way out or to guide someone in to help us.

    Since then we have made it a point to discuss our options and make sure we actually know where things are before we go, and esp. when going solo. This way we can bail or call for help at almost any point on a ride.
    Notes on your map will help, even if it's a hand-drawn map.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  40. #40
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    When I was in college, I liked to spend time in the remote back country...often by myself, but with friends too.

    I decided to do something that might seem over kill to some: I spent $500 and got a basic-EMT license. Never really used to in a professional sense, and when it came time to renew, I let it lapse...but the training has payed off like crazy.

    It's $500 bucks, and a couple nights of your week for about 6 months. It teaches you way more than you'll learn in any first aid class, but more importantly...it turns situations that'll freak some people out into muscle memory. You learn not to panic in certain situations, but instead react.

    I've actually used the skills I learned a few times (though, mostly after coming up on car wrecks...not in the wilderness). Plus, if your into it...you can always put those skills to work for a local volunteer EMS/FD.

    Seriously, one of the best investments I've ever made.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Pirate View Post
    When I was in college, I liked to spend time in the remote back country...often by myself, but with friends too.

    I decided to do something that might seem over kill to some: I spent $500 and got a basic-EMT license. Never really used to in a professional sense, and when it came time to renew, I let it lapse...but the training has payed off like crazy.

    It's $500 bucks, and a couple nights of your week for about 6 months. It teaches you way more than you'll learn in any first aid class, but more importantly...it turns situations that'll freak some people out into muscle memory. You learn not to panic in certain situations, but instead react.

    I've actually used the skills I learned a few times (though, mostly after coming up on car wrecks...not in the wilderness). Plus, if your into it...you can always put those skills to work for a local volunteer EMS/FD.

    Seriously, one of the best investments I've ever made.

    That is one of the reasons I had joined ski patrol. I got really good first responder training and taught how to improvise when you don't always have the right equipment.

    It also gave me some thing to do in winter.

  42. #42
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    A lot of times if there is no cell signal, you can still get a text out.

  43. #43
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    Sure the Spot is a fun gadget to send messages and let people track your location, but when s*** really hits the fans, you're going to want a personal locator beacon.

    PLBs are way more powerful and reliable, plus they don't require a subscription. Here's the smallest and lightest one on the market at REI.

  44. #44
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    I always carry a lcp and 3 shots 5 seconds apart out of a firearm is an international signal of distress. Even if someone doesn't understand the shots meaning they will remember it happening and will most likely help with a search.

  45. #45
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    [QUOTE=dochou;9647519]7

    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.

    I never tell my wife where mi a going. I find that my
    Gir
    lfriend is much more responsive.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    PLBs are way more powerful and reliable, plus they don't require a subscription.
    +1. PLB is always in my camelbak

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    Geez

    I don;t carry a cell.....cause mostly it is out of range or dead trying to get an analog signal...

    So I tell people where I am going, and of course becareful, pay attention and smarten up.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecializedWindsor View Post
    You're assuming that the person either has matches or the necessary survival skills in order to create a fire without them.
    Most people don't know how to make a fire without matches.
    You are also assuming that the person is able to gather enough tinder, kindling, and fuel in order to create and sustain a fire.
    I'm certainly not saying that building a fire is a bad idea, but most people probably wouldn't be able to, and the situation would be worse if they were injured.
    Then carry a ****ing ELT transmitter and shove it up your anus where you can just squeeze to activate it. God... did you even read the OP''s first message ?
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave94024 View Post
    +1. PLB is always in my camelbak
    Where does the signal go when you set it off?

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    You can always signal over flying jumbo jets by burning your tires

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarBoom View Post
    I always carry a lcp and 3 shots 5 seconds apart out of a firearm is an international signal of distress.
    Just make sure to save one... for yourself... just in case
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Where does the signal go when you set it off?
    PLBs use NOAA and COSPAS-SARSATT satellites.

    Here's a good overview of how they work.
    Choosing and Using a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)

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    I have done search and rescue work in the Lake Tahoe area for nearly 15 years. For missing persons, we typically get bad information as to where to search. For a search to be successful, we need to have a route. We then can guage average speed of the subject over the terrain given and create an area of probability that is searched by a hasty team ( a team that quickly searches the area defined by the known accesible routes). The longer a person is over due, the larger the area to be searched becomes and the probability of success diminishes. This is why it is so important to leave a detailed plan. Without a plan, we don't have much to go off of. Simply finding your car at a trailhead only tells us that you might be "somewhere" within the many square miles and multitude of trails that the trailhead serves.

    I can't tell you hown many simple searches turned into multi day epics because the subject deviated from the plan. If you create a route and are going solo, do not deviate from the route.

    We also stress to adults the same thing we stress to kids. Stay put. There is nothing worse that a lost or missing person going off trail into drainages, up cliffs, down ravines etc. all in the hope that they may shortcut themselves to civilization. By moving without proper navigation tools and training, you are only making the search area bigger.

    All of this information is the same if you are injured as well. Let's face it, if you break a femur on the trail, there is not much you will be able to do but wait. That is why I believe the single most important thing to do is leave a detailed plan and overdue time.

    Don't just simply write a note stating Climbing Mt. Tallac. Detail parking at which trailhead, climbing and descending by route or multiple routes, estimated round trip time, overdue time, equipment carried, etc.

    An example of one of my recent notes:

    Home to Railroad Grade to Cold Creek Trail to Star Lake Connector Trail to Star Lake. Tahoe Rim Trail to Freel Pass to Armstrong Pass. Armstrong trail to Connector trail to Corrall Trail to Cedar trail to Railroad Grade to Home. Estimated time 4.5 hours. Consider overdue at 9:00 p.m. Carrying water, food, jacket, phone, first aid, lighter, headlamp, compass and map.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmybagadonuts View Post
    ... the single most important thing to do is leave a detailed plan and overdue time.
    I totally agree! If you have no Overdue Time given, your 'back home contact' might hem & haw, and not call for help thinking you are going to show up "any minute", even if they are worried you are late. If they know you have set a specific time, it's likely easier for them to go through with the act of calling the S.O., or local SAR group.

    I hand out copies of the Alaska State Troopers travel plan they used to have back in the 90's. They came out with a more condensed version after that, and I'm not sure what they have now. It asks for the same information you and I both recommend here. I would put a copy with a copy of a topo map for the area I was traveling, and hang it on the fridge.
    Now I tell someone where I'm going. The people I ride with and my GF know the equipment I carry and the skills I have, both medical and survival.
    I always check back in with them upon my return.

    Quote Originally Posted by WarBoom
    ... 3 shots 5 seconds apart out of a firearm is an international signal of distress. Even if someone doesn't understand the shots meaning they will remember it happening and will most likely help with a search.
    You'd be surprised the number of people who don't know the "international signal for distress".
    Where do you think people learn it now-a-days?
    How many movies, t.v. shows, do you see it played out in?
    The reality, in my experience is gunshots in the wilderness are like car alarms in the city... noisy and annoying to people.

    Depending on where you are, gunshots might not be uncommon. Also, as many people as there are who really dislike guns today, you might be upsetting them more than putting them on alert that someone is needing help. If you are firing a gun on the trail, you may actually spook people into leaving who may or may not call law enforcement (some people do not want to "get involved", just get mad).

    Gunshots carry quite far depending on geography. Waiting 5 seconds between shots might be too long to sound like a distress signal.

    Personally, I recommend people not count on a firearm for signaling, but rather carry a whistle instead. The blast of a whistle is not common out in the wilderness. The multi-tone varieties out there now make for a distinct sound.
    A whistle can be used without your hands, or just one hand. A whistle can be blown as long as you have the energy to do so.

    Depending on the caliber and type, a gun might require two hands to safely fire without hurting yourself or others. A gun, depending on caliber and model, makes a loud report loud enough to make your ears ring, temporarily but maybe too long... I think it would be nice to be able to hear shouts back to me.

    I have carried firearms for different reasons for many years. I do take a firearm out into the wilderness with me, but I also carry better signaling devices too.
    I'd like to count on my firearms and the limited rounds for the one thing a gun is really good for... shooting at something, not signaling.
    I tried, but stopped carrying a handgun while MTB'ing.
    I believe there's a thread elsewhere about carrying firearms on the trail, so I'll leave this subject for that debate.

    With any audible signal, you have to remember that vegetation (ground level and canopy), hills, moving water, and wind will all play into how far your sound carries, and what it sounds like over that distance.
    The other thing about audible signals is that it's often hard to pinpoint the origin of them out in the boonies.

  55. #55
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    Best thing is to wear matching Chartreuse socks, helmet, shoes, shorts and underwear... Trust me
    I do all my own stunts, but never intentionally...

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    Pray?

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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    lol.. i'm picturing a dude wrapped around a tree, pinned between his bike and some bushes on the side.... calling out in the most pathetic of tone, "help i've fallen and i can't get up!"
    When I crashed a few weeks ago I ended up lying on the ground, bike on top of me, unable to get up, my right foot trapped in the gap between the front wheel and fork, a torn left shoulder and a left leg that had spasmed so badly I still can't move it three weeks later. Just thinking of if that fall had been out in the middle of nowhere makes me shudder. I'd probably still be there.

    If you're riding by yourself in a remote area the main thing is to try and avoid getting into a situation where you injure yourself badly in the first place. The vast majority of falls are avoidable with hindsight.

    A good piece of advice that I saw on a motorcycle forum is to always ride well within your limits. There's a time and place for stretching yourself skills wise. You're far less likely to fall off riding at 60% than at 90 - 100%. Don't be afraid to walk any parts that you're not completely confident of clearing too. It's better to make it home in one piece than try an obstacle, fail and hurt yourself a long way from help.

    It's also worth bearing in mind that you're more likely to crash when tired. Beware of "one last run" syndrome where you're nearing the end of a ride, feeling it a bit but decide to do one last section before heading home. Trails that are easy when you're fresh can really catch you out if you're tired.
    Last edited by WR304; 09-06-2012 at 02:51 AM.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarBoom View Post
    I always carry a lcp and 3 shots 5 seconds apart out of a firearm is an international signal of distress. Even if someone doesn't understand the shots meaning they will remember it happening and will most likely help with a search.
    Hum...I've been dealing with firearms for 25 yrs and never heard this until now. I'm not saying you're wrong, I actually looked it up and sure enough, it's a suggested signaling method...just don't do it inside enemy territory. Anyhow, my point if anything, if an experienced shooter/hunter has never heard this, the average person is for sure not going to know about it an blow it off as some guy out shooting in the woods. As for people who heard the shots aiding in the search or what have you, I wouldn't hold my breath. As I mentioned earlier, people are going to blow it off as some guy/people popping off rounds in the woods.

    Anyhow, in all seriousness, in the event something does happen while out biking by your self, stick to the trail if all humanly possible. Trails are well traveled and you will eventually see someone. So crawl if you have too but get back on the physical trail path. Also, carry a whistle. You can buy a cheap plastic whistle for nothing and they don't weigh enough or take up enough room but yet are very effective signaling devices. Finally, my last advice is actually my first advice mentioned and that is start a fire. There is no shortage of fire wood in the woods but if all else fails, you can burn your bike tires. A fire serves a two fold purpose, singling as well as a means of keeping warm...FYI: fires are easily seen at night, so make sure to keep it burning through the night. And before I forget, text a friend or family member letting them know the specific trail you plan to ride. That will give people a much closer zone for searching should you come up missing. This needs to be done before you leave and possibly end up in a Dead Zone.

    I spend a lot of time in Dead Zones or areas without cell service due to working in the oilfield. I never know where I'm going to be nor how long I'm goin to be at a location. I have spent 43hrs straight on a site in the middle of a dead zone located 50 miles away from the nearest town and 100 miles from the closest hospital. As long as you keep your head, plan your trip/bike ride, take enough food/water, you should be fine.

  59. #59
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    Gals and Guys....

    Think through this thing about fire...
    Take it from someone who has spent years in the backcountry, been taught survival from many experts in the field (military and civilian), and taught it back to people... fires are nice, but you have to have the skills and equipment/materials if you think you are going to use one in a survival situation.

    Not ragging on anyone here... you especially 50calray(just because I'm posting this right after your post ).

    To start a fire, you need the right atmospheric conditions... the right starting fuel... the right ignition source... the proper fuels in the proper amounts... and a means of protecting your fire in adverse weather conditions.

    Atmospheric conditions... most folks probably get the idea that if it's wet weather, it'll be hard to start or maintain a fire without something like gasoline.
    But it doesn't have to be raining... just have the right amount of water in the air.
    Depending on what you are using as tinder and fuel... you may not get a fire going... much of a fire going... or be able to maintain the fire(or keep it big enough to be effective for the intended purpose).

    You can split wet fuels down in some cases to expose dry interiors which will burn well.
    You can wrap wet fuels in absorbent material to help dry them out enough to ignite... sometimes.
    You can add fire gels and flammable liquids that burn long enough to bring the heat up high enough to drive off the moisture and bring the fuel to it's combustible state.

    If you can't do any of those things... you won't have fire.

    Having the correct fuels...
    Tinder... the initial fuel source for catching a spark, igniting from a flame, or the sunlight magnified through a reflective/magnifying source.
    Because tinder has to have a low surface volume and low ignition point, it is also susceptible to soaking up moisture from the ground or air.

    Small to Medium Fuels... Twigs, sticks, grass, leaves, and the like. You need plenty of this to help increase your flames intensity to a point it brings the larger fuels to a combustible state.

    Large Fuels... branches, large pieces of wood, bark, whole tree trunks, and the like.
    As mentioned above, you need to have a decent flame going to bring these larger fuels to a state where they will catch fire. Then... you need enough of this fuel to keep the fire going for as long as you desire it.

    Hard vs Soft woods... basically it's Softwood to get a fire going... Hardwood to keep it going and to reap nice hot coals for other purposes.

    If you think you are going to crash your MTB... rally yourself and gather enough fuel to not only start your fire, but keep it going all night long, AND, have it large enough and exposed enough to have other people see it... you probably have a real job ahead of you, and one that is too much for someone who cannot extricate themselves from their dilemma anyway.

    Now... I'm not saying it's impossible... but you had better take a serious look at where you ride and what you have available to start your fire... then maintain your fire with.

    Burn your bicycle tires? I can tell you from personal experience that burning a car tire can provide a good amount of thick black smoke lofting into the sky... ONCE it catches fire.
    You ain't gonna do that with a small fire or a match.
    Seriously... take an old bike tire out and put it on fire. Watch how much THICK BLACK SMOKE comes roiling off it.
    Take into account the wind and air pressure.
    You may find that mother nature isn't interested in helping you create a nice thick column of black smoke rising up into the air for all to see.
    You may find instead that your puny smoke is held down low because of air pressure.
    Or you may find the wind disperses it into a thin dark mass blowing all over the place.

    Basically, I'm just trying to get people to think through the common hype that "Fire will save me because _______!".
    I see/hear it with other aspects of survival as well.

    If you really do plan on carrying a tool to start fires with on the trail(which is not a bad idea... really!)... please be sure to practice it at home... outside... in the dark, cold, and wet... when you are shivering uncontrollably.
    This not only helps you understand how difficult it may be when you are very cold... but also in shock... and in great pain.

    Think of the most common injuries people report here... F.O.O.S.H. (falling on outstretched hands) injuries like broken/injured bones/joints from fingers all the way up through your shoulder.
    Head injuries
    Broken ribs
    If you haven't sustained any of these type of injuries... bad enough to keep you from getting yourself back to the trailhead and to your vehicle... you need to have a serious talk with someone who has.
    Even "flicking your bic" can be impossibly difficult if you do not have the proper dexterity required.

    ... just saying...

  60. #60
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    Save yourself or die. It's called Natural Selection.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wsmac View Post
    Gals and Guys....

    Think through this thing about fire...
    Take it from someone who has spent years in the backcountry, been taught survival from many experts in the field (military and civilian), and taught it back to people... fires are nice, but you have to have the skills and equipment/materials if you think you are going to use one in a survival situation.

    Not ragging on anyone here... you especially 50calray(just because I'm posting this right after your post ).

    To start a fire, you need the right atmospheric conditions... the right starting fuel... the right ignition source... the proper fuels in the proper amounts... and a means of protecting your fire in adverse weather conditions.

    Atmospheric conditions... most folks probably get the idea that if it's wet weather, it'll be hard to start or maintain a fire without something like gasoline.
    But it doesn't have to be raining... just have the right amount of water in the air.
    Depending on what you are using as tinder and fuel... you may not get a fire going... much of a fire going... or be able to maintain the fire(or keep it big enough to be effective for the intended purpose).

    You can split wet fuels down in some cases to expose dry interiors which will burn well.
    You can wrap wet fuels in absorbent material to help dry them out enough to ignite... sometimes.
    You can add fire gels and flammable liquids that burn long enough to bring the heat up high enough to drive off the moisture and bring the fuel to it's combustible state.

    If you can't do any of those things... you won't have fire.

    Having the correct fuels...
    Tinder... the initial fuel source for catching a spark, igniting from a flame, or the sunlight magnified through a reflective/magnifying source.
    Because tinder has to have a low surface volume and low ignition point, it is also susceptible to soaking up moisture from the ground or air.

    Small to Medium Fuels... Twigs, sticks, grass, leaves, and the like. You need plenty of this to help increase your flames intensity to a point it brings the larger fuels to a combustible state.

    Large Fuels... branches, large pieces of wood, bark, whole tree trunks, and the like.
    As mentioned above, you need to have a decent flame going to bring these larger fuels to a state where they will catch fire. Then... you need enough of this fuel to keep the fire going for as long as you desire it.

    Hard vs Soft woods... basically it's Softwood to get a fire going... Hardwood to keep it going and to reap nice hot coals for other purposes.

    If you think you are going to crash your MTB... rally yourself and gather enough fuel to not only start your fire, but keep it going all night long, AND, have it large enough and exposed enough to have other people see it... you probably have a real job ahead of you, and one that is too much for someone who cannot extricate themselves from their dilemma anyway.

    Now... I'm not saying it's impossible... but you had better take a serious look at where you ride and what you have available to start your fire... then maintain your fire with.

    Burn your bicycle tires? I can tell you from personal experience that burning a car tire can provide a good amount of thick black smoke lofting into the sky... ONCE it catches fire.
    You ain't gonna do that with a small fire or a match.
    Seriously... take an old bike tire out and put it on fire. Watch how much THICK BLACK SMOKE comes roiling off it.
    Take into account the wind and air pressure.
    You may find that mother nature isn't interested in helping you create a nice thick column of black smoke rising up into the air for all to see.
    You may find instead that your puny smoke is held down low because of air pressure.
    Or you may find the wind disperses it into a thin dark mass blowing all over the place.

    Basically, I'm just trying to get people to think through the common hype that "Fire will save me because _______!".
    I see/hear it with other aspects of survival as well.

    If you really do plan on carrying a tool to start fires with on the trail(which is not a bad idea... really!)... please be sure to practice it at home... outside... in the dark, cold, and wet... when you are shivering uncontrollably.
    This not only helps you understand how difficult it may be when you are very cold... but also in shock... and in great pain.

    Think of the most common injuries people report here... F.O.O.S.H. (falling on outstretched hands) injuries like broken/injured bones/joints from fingers all the way up through your shoulder.
    Head injuries
    Broken ribs
    If you haven't sustained any of these type of injuries... bad enough to keep you from getting yourself back to the trailhead and to your vehicle... you need to have a serious talk with someone who has.
    Even "flicking your bic" can be impossibly difficult if you do not have the proper dexterity required.

    ... just saying...
    You got any Cliff Notes by chance?

    Man, no, Neanderthals and troglodytes has been building fires for nearly 2 million years. As difficult as you make building a fire out to be, if the stupist creatures in the history of the planet can build and control fire, you would think it wouldn't be an issue for modern man.

    Now with that said, some people can't even tie their shoes...yes I can tie my shoes, I'm just too lazy...hey, atleast I admit it lol. Anyhow, You can pick up a Magnesium/flint fire starter for $10-20.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by 50calray View Post
    You got any Cliff Notes by chance?

    Man, no, Neanderthals and troglodytes has been building fires for nearly 2 million years. As difficult as you make building a fire out to be, if the stupist creatures in the history of the planet can build and control fire, you would think it wouldn't be an issue for modern man.
    I don't consider any of our Ancestors to be stupid creatures.
    If they were "the stupist"... we wouldn't be here.

    Primitive fire is something they seemed to have developed over time and with a whole lot less to do in their lives than modern man.

    Primitive societies came up with essential techniques and tools to do a limited number of things required for their survival. No mean feat!
    We have burdened ourselves with a whole lot of... well, whatever you want to call it.

    You assume they did control fire and I'm guessing built it quite easily.
    That's not what I've gathered from studying primitive living skills and practicing them.

    Starting fire is difficult for a person who does not do it everyday of their lives... because their life depends on it.

    Bow drills, hand drills, piston type fire starters, fire saws, sparking tools, and the like were used often enough that the person using them became adept at it. They also knew the area they lived (wouldn't find them jetting around the continental U.S. like we do), the materials they could use for fire, when and where to find these materials, and how to safeguard them to help ensure their fire-building efforts paid off.

    Don't make their efforts sound so simple.

    You can buy a sparking tool (of which there are several adaptations) and shoot off sparks all day long without building a fire.
    I watch my students do this in every class I teach.

    I know from experience that the general person is not adept at starting a fire with tools most common for an outdoor traveller.

    You can make it sound like it's no big deal... I know better.
    Like I've said before... I'm also giving my information geared towards what the OP opened up with ... an emergency situation.

    I've been there.
    I've studied other survivor's experiences.
    I've practiced everything I preach (teach).
    If you have no trouble starting a fire and keeping it going all night long no matter the conditions, the area you are in, the type and amount of fuel you have at hand, and the tools you have with you, and the physical condition you are in... BRAVO!

    I can start a fire pretty much any place I travel to.
    I have failed at times too.
    I also know I have yet to meet a person who will make fire every single time they try, and I'm talking about people regarded as experts.
    I'm only 52... but I've got some real world experience to go by, for sure!

  63. #63
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    Would the anonymous person who gave me Neg Rep and this comment, "Primitive fire? Primitive man? Sorry but thats some ridiculous liberal rhetoric"... what does liberal rhetoric have to do with primitive fire and man?

    Not sure you're making sense here

    In the world of primitive/aboriginal studies, the term "primitive" has nothing to do with personal politics.
    Anyway... just send me a simple explanation with neg rep again (since that seems to be your preferred method of communication ), or maybe a pm.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael1 View Post
    Sure the Spot is a fun gadget to send messages and let people track your location, but when s*** really hits the fans, you're going to want a personal locator beacon.

    PLBs are way more powerful and reliable, plus they don't require a subscription. Here's the smallest and lightest one on the market at REI.

    This!

    A spot is nothing compared to a GPS equipped 406mhz plb with 121.5 mhz for homing is built to a standard that is used around the world by aircraft and boats. The signal is not sent to a commercial satellite but to ones maintained by governments. There is no yearly fee to have one of these PLB beacons and works worldwide.

    While the spot is a commercial product that talks to commercial satellites, has a much weaker signal, there is a yearly fee and does not work worldwide. Yes, it sends I am ok messages but who cares?

    If you are going to stake your life on a beacon a GPS 406mhz one is the only way to go.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by dochou View Post
    I like to ride trails on my own. But where I ride there is no cell phone coverage.
    What advice do people have in case of an emergency?
    How should I prepare for an emergency?
    What should I do if I have a major crash and can not ride or walk out of the forrest?
    I usually tell my wife where I am riding but I think it would be a long time before someone came to rescue me and then they still have to locate my exact location.
    Thanks for any advice.


    Buy yourself a wilderness survival book, take a class, leave a note and tell someone where you are going preferably with a fairly detailed map so they have a real Idea. And try not to deviate from your original plans, such as saying you are going to this mountain, and going to another instead.
    A cell phone or gps device is by no means a guarentee of survival, plenty of people are still lost and die, many more I suspect simply because they have relied on a technology which can and will fail (broken, dead battery ect) and IM sure they find themselves staring at a useless piece of plastic at that point.
    It is absolutely amazing that people managed to survive up until a few years ago without a cell phone and daddy watching them on their computer.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsmac View Post
    I don't consider any of our Ancestors to be stupid creatures.
    If they were "the stupist"... we wouldn't be here.

    Primitive fire is something they seemed to have developed over time and with a whole lot less to do in their lives than modern man.

    Primitive societies came up with essential techniques and tools to do a limited number of things required for their survival. No mean feat!
    We have burdened ourselves with a whole lot of... well, whatever you want to call it.

    You assume they did control fire and I'm guessing built it quite easily.
    That's not what I've gathered from studying primitive living skills and practicing them.

    Starting fire is difficult for a person who does not do it everyday of their lives... because their life depends on it.

    Bow drills, hand drills, piston type fire starters, fire saws, sparking tools, and the like were used often enough that the person using them became adept at it. They also knew the area they lived (wouldn't find them jetting around the continental U.S. like we do), the materials they could use for fire, when and where to find these materials, and how to safeguard them to help ensure their fire-building efforts paid off.

    Don't make their efforts sound so simple.

    You can buy a sparking tool (of which there are several adaptations) and shoot off sparks all day long without building a fire.
    I watch my students do this in every class I teach.

    I know from experience that the general person is not adept at starting a fire with tools most common for an outdoor traveller.

    You can make it sound like it's no big deal... I know better.
    Like I've said before... I'm also giving my information geared towards what the OP opened up with ... an emergency situation.

    I've been there.
    I've studied other survivor's experiences.
    I've practiced everything I preach (teach).
    If you have no trouble starting a fire and keeping it going all night long no matter the conditions, the area you are in, the type and amount of fuel you have at hand, and the tools you have with you, and the physical condition you are in... BRAVO!

    I can start a fire pretty much any place I travel to.
    I have failed at times too.
    I also know I have yet to meet a person who will make fire every single time they try, and I'm talking about people regarded as experts.
    I'm only 52... but I've got some real world experience to go by, for sure!
    excellent post, except the only time I have ever failed to build a fire was with a "sparking device" and of course I was hunting, wet cold, miserable and realy looking forward to one, that pretty little device sits on a shelf now, and I stick to a lighter/Matches, stick with what you know I guess.
    For starting a fire I have always carried a handful of dryer lint as well as a small candle for emergency situations. So light, I have no Idea why someone would not.


    You probably know this but many do not, primitive man often never let a fire go out, they would carry coals as they traveled to hopefully guarentee themselves a fire in their next location. Lets face it, building a fire using friction is hard damn work.

  67. #67
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    You can carry a wad of OOOO steel wool and a headlamp or any other light source using at least 2 1.5v batteries or a 9v battery.

    Depending on your headlamp/light (torch for you mtb'ers across the pond ), you may be able to short a bit of steel wool across the contacts inside with the switch on, to make the steel wool burn.

    Otherwise, you can remove the batteries, hold them end-to-end (positive to negative), then pull out a long thin bit of steel wool and touch one end to the negative end of your battery stack, and the other to the positive end of the battery stack.

    Brushing the steel wool across one of the battery ends should create an arc which will be hot enough to make the steel wool burn.

    Steel wool is not affected by water other than the moisture having a cooling/damping effect on the heat from the arc. You can dry your steel wool off pretty easily if it does get damp.

    Figuring some bikers carry a light even when they are not night biking... a little steel wool can help make up your fire-starting kit pretty easily.

    As always... practice this with the equipment you plan on carrying with you.

    eta: I have found that you only need 3 volts to do this. Weak batteries will not work as well... or not at all.
    It doesn't matter if your 3v comes from AAA, AA, C or D size batteries.

    The difficulty I see people having is keeping the batteries in contact with each other, while holding them in hand, then connecting the steel wool to each end of the stack.
    If you have tape... you can tape the batteries together to help keep contact.
    Once the steel wool has burnt, it turns a bluish shade. You cannot reignite burnt steel wool.

  68. #68
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    Yup possible low battery is why I never bothered with the steel wool although it should not be discounted.
    Im not sure if it was brought up already, but people Space Blankets are tiny, very lightweight and can save you from hypothermia should you have to spend a cold night somewhere.
    Foil Emergency Space Blanket - (56" x 80")-americanlifeguard

    Trying to start a fire when you are already wet, cold and miserable sucks and if you are shaking to bad, may be impossible.
    The blanket is in my day packs, fanny packs (also carry a survival bag in the car/truck) .
    pine bough can also be used as a blanket, its a good Idea to lay some under you too or even clumps of grass to help keep you off the ground which sucks away body heat.

    A little pocket whistle is a good Idea too, people tend to want to stay next to a creek or river in a survival situation, personally I think you are better off being away from one somewhat so that you can hear possible searchers yelling for ya.

    The single biggest thing anyone can do is keep control of your mind, especially at night in the middle of nowhere can really mess with people who are not used to it. Critters make all kinds of sounds and that deer moving thru the trees a few yards away becomes Sasquatch in your mind.
    Like WSMAC most of my life has been spent in the back country, in just about every form Imaginable, Im not paranoid, just prepared with at least the basics.

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    I carry a bandana, whistle, knife. Good to go for most situations.

    Also, more water and food than I really need.
    Bike repair tools - multi, tire levers, spare tube, patch kit, pump
    Light wind jacket and lighter are good calls too.


    PavementGravelDirt: MTB Bike and Gear

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