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  1. #1
    Christoph NorCal
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    Training a dog to mountain bike with you

    Hi everyone,

    I am looking for good training tips to train a dog to go mountain biking. I do plan on taking the dog to obedient training. My plan is to rescue a Rhodesian Ridgeback. The type of trails I will be on will be Northern California fireroads and single track. I have read a few posts already in the General Discussion section and found some good training tips. Any suggestions or recommendation will be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by ccastro; 02-24-2012 at 09:22 AM.
    CC

    Climb, climb, climb, work harder suffer less....

  2. #2
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    It was simple for me because my dog always wants to be at my side and I can trust her off the leash when is just us. I find it easier than taking the pooch for a walk. My dog it always trying to keep up to my pace rather than walking with her and holding her energy back.

    Sent from my bulletproof Commando.

  3. #3
    AZ
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    Clip less or flats?

  4. #4
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    Your dog will have a hard time pedaling, their knees are backwards.

  5. #5
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    Big dog, he'll need a 9er fur sure.

  6. #6
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    If you figure out how to get a dog to learn enough balance and how to peddle, let us know. Training one to mountain bike could be tricky. Maybe taking him along to run with you first so he can see what biking is all about?

  7. #7
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    I suggest that you let him try it with a couple of trainer-wheels at first.
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  8. #8
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    A ridgeback may be challenging to trail ride with, especially a young male. I'd think other animals will surely be the biggest task. Once you get to good on leash behavior your on your way. Then maybe some riding in an enclosed space, but either way get it used to the bike straight away.
    It will take some work, and IMO some dogs will never be good trail dogs just because of their genes, and also some trails just shouldn't have dogs, but when it works well it's great.
    Round and round we go

  9. #9
    Christoph NorCal
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    Ah... at last someone who gets the post. Thank Meat for your feedback. I'm looking at adopting a 3 year old female Rhodesian Ridgeback. I plan on working with the dog on voice commands and getting her use to the bike.
    CC

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  10. #10
    The Unaffiliated
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccastro View Post
    Ah... at last someone who gets the post. Thank Meat for your feedback. I'm looking at adopting a 3 year old female Rhodesian Ridgeback. I plan on working with the dog on voice commands and getting her use to the bike.
    I read an article somewhere that recommended walking your bike around an open area and purposefully bumping the dog with the front tire. Not hard enough to hurt the dog and not in a way that the dog thinks it is a game. They need to learn not to be in front of a bike when it is moving. Haven't tried it myself, yet, but seems logical.

    I think the biggest challenge will be how the dog handles other riders and other dogs, you will have to show some real "Dog Whisperer" leadership.

    Also, this might not effect you if you are rescuing a dog, but DO NOT run a puppy to hard or too far. It can negatively impact their development.

  11. #11
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    Someone who i saw regularly on our rounds with my dog, has a female Rhodesian Ridgeback as well.
    A really wonderfull and obediant dog that could get along with everybody and all other dogs.
    Butt...
    When she takes her for a run or a bikeride in the forrest, she always has to be aware of rabbits, squirrels etc, cause she had caught and shredded a few in the past.
    That was her only flaw.

    And since yours is already 3 years, it may be hard to get rid of some old bad habits.
    so i guess you would have to be extra carefull on and around the trails (anywhere else as well for that mather) cause you never know what she has done in the past in similar situations.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirt_Guy View Post
    It was simple for me because my dog always wants to be at my side and I can trust her off the leash when is just us. I find it easier than taking the pooch for a walk. My dog it always trying to keep up to my pace rather than walking with her and holding her energy back.

    Sent from my bulletproof Commando.
    Don't you have problems running over her if she's right next to you on the trial? It would seem better to have the dog learn to keep behind you on the bike.

    I'm glad you posted this thread, and I'd love to hear how other people have trained their dogs for riding. We're looking into getting a dog (a lab or golden, probably) and I'm curious as to what works.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

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    Do all mtbers a huge service and leave your mutts at home.

  14. #14
    Subject to Whimsy
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccastro View Post
    Ah... at last someone who gets the post. Thank Meat for your feedback. I'm looking at adopting a 3 year old female Rhodesian Ridgeback. I plan on working with the dog on voice commands and getting her use to the bike.
    Females are best. they listen and stay by your side better.

    I have a 4 year old Lab cross that I've had since a pup and she is a great trail companion. I didn't really 'train' her other than just figured out what works best. We are at the point where she knows exactly what I want from her regarding other trail users and I rarely have to so much as speak to her.

    My only real suggestion would be to treat her with an appropriate diet that will give her the energy to run with you and ensure she doesn't overheat by allowing her to cool off in creeks, etc. plus grab a drink when she needs it.

    Oh and I prefer the dog is in front of me. She acts as an alert if there are other trail users ahead of me plus I can keep an eye on her. She will quickly get out of my way when we hit techy or downhill stuff though. A few tire buzzes early in her career and she caught on quickly.

  15. #15
    Christoph NorCal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabies010 View Post
    Someone who i saw regularly on our rounds with my dog, has a female Rhodesian Ridgeback as well.
    A really wonderfull and obediant dog that could get along with everybody and all other dogs.
    Butt...
    When she takes her for a run or a bikeride in the forrest, she always has to be aware of rabbits, squirrels etc, cause she had caught and shredded a few in the past.
    That was her only flaw.

    And since yours is already 3 years, it may be hard to get rid of some old bad habits.
    so i guess you would have to be extra carefull on and around the trails (anywhere else as well for that mather) cause you never know what she has done in the past in similar situations.
    Rhodesian Ridgebacks are sight hounds that do have the instinct to go after small game. That will be something I will need to look out for. Lots of ground squirrels in the East Bay Regional park system.
    CC

    Climb, climb, climb, work harder suffer less....

  16. #16
    Christoph NorCal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slowup View Post
    Females are best. they listen and stay by your side better.

    I have a 4 year old Lab cross that I've had since a pup and she is a great trail companion. I didn't really 'train' her other than just figured out what works best. We are at the point where she knows exactly what I want from her regarding other trail users and I rarely have to so much as speak to her.

    My only real suggestion would be to treat her with an appropriate diet that will give her the energy to run with you and ensure she doesn't overheat by allowing her to cool off in creeks, etc. plus grab a drink when she needs it.

    Oh and I prefer the dog is in front of me. She acts as an alert if there are other trail users ahead of me plus I can keep an eye on her. She will quickly get out of my way when we hit techy or downhill stuff though. A few tire buzzes early in her career and she caught on quickly.
    Good suggestion on the diet. I will need to do some research on that. I do plan on carrying extra water for the dog. Some of the parks do have ponds.
    CC

    Climb, climb, climb, work harder suffer less....

  17. #17
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    Ridgebacks where bred for taking down large game in packs. There also needed to be element of surprise so they had to listen silently, quickly. A sight hound yes, partly, but should be fearless in a pack setting, so small animals may not be the only concern. They're also able to go long distances without food or water, do well with big fast temp swings, and are nearly impervious to bugs.
    Think this breed shows alot of great "trail dog" potential, but if it has aggresive tendencies, and/or doesn't have a clear firm leader if needed, it may never be trail worthy.
    My .02

    Oh, and how exactly does riding trails with a leash work? some kinda magic leash, or just plain magic? lol
    Last edited by theMeat; 02-25-2012 at 01:14 PM.
    Round and round we go

  18. #18
    Sweep the leg!
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    I sincerely hope your dog never causes a crash or another to be injured. If you live in the US you are liable for your dogs actions regardless of leash laws.

    I wouldn't ride with anyone that tried to bring a dog along. Please leave it at home.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  19. #19
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    I've taken my Standard Poodle for runs around the neighborhood to burn off energy with an expanding leash. It has worked out pretty good and now he run along side me on the bike when I get it out but I haven't taken him on the trails yet. He's just turned a year and is finally getting out of the puppy stage enough to pay attention.

  20. #20
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    Just what we need, more flea bitten hounds to get in the way causing accidents, biting people and crapping on the trails. At least the bears and mountain lions will thin them out.

  21. #21
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    Riding with dogs is awesome, but I hope you have a suitable place to take it, and train it well..... because as you can see, many people can't seem to control themselves or their bike, nor can they comprehend sharing "their" trail. so they get all bent, when a dog (runner, child, deer, tree) "makes" them wreck, or simply inconveniences them in the slightest....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by d365 View Post
    Riding with dogs is awesome, but I hope you have a suitable place to take it, and train it well..... because as you can see, many people can't seem to control themselves or their bike, nor can they comprehend sharing "their" trail. so they get all bent, when a dog (runner, child, deer, tree) "makes" them wreck, or simply inconveniences them in the slightest....


    Running over a dog is more than an inconvenience, it is a needless endangerment, all because some simple sob can't think of anyone but themselves. And thanks for the sanctimonious reply in your feeble attempt to inflame the thread.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Running over a dog is more than an inconvenience, it is a needless endangerment, all because some simple sob can't think of anyone but themselves. And thanks for the sanctimonious reply in your feeble attempt to inflame the thread.
    edit: sorry RS. bad day, over the top response. my apologies. read AZ's quote if you want to see how I respond before counting to 10.

    running over a dog, is you not controlling yourself or your bike.... I like sharing, and have no problem watching out for other trail users, even the most minimally trained dog, kid, runner.
    Last edited by d365; 02-24-2012 at 05:39 PM. Reason: to be the kinder, gentler me....

  24. #24
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by d365 View Post
    running over a dog, is you not controlling yourself or your bike.... I say, you are a feeble, needless endangerment, who can't think of anyone else but yourself.... how's that for inflamed db?



    Wow. How do you really feel?

  25. #25
    Iko
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    Biking with the dog is a blast!
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