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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The one yielding should pull off on the right regardless of up or down. On this side [Northern Hemisphere] of the equator anyway.
    What if there's a cliff, or some cactus on the right?
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  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    What if there's a cliff, or some cactus on the right?
    I always pull over to the left side of the pile of horse crap.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    So what happens when two mountain bikers encounter each other on flat ground? Personally, I try to stop for everyone, unless they beat me to it. Of course, I have a timber bell on my bars so I sound like an angry mob of Salvation Army Santas chasing a grinch though the forest. I've found that most people have already stopped by the time I get to them.
    Generally speaking, whoever farts the loudest has the right of way.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Maybe in AZ. New England? Different story for me in some areas. How about lots of trails being lost to new wildernuts designations? Housing and suburban sprawl everywhere?
    Can't say... maybe it's more of a blue state problem??!!

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    What if there's a cliff, or some cactus on the right?
    Depends on what side of the equator you are on.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This should not be confusing.

    If you are on a trail section where you do not have the right away, you prepare to stop every time you encounter someone on the trail. If no one has the right of way, you prepare to stop when you encounter someone on the trail.

    What it shouldn't be is a "ride at the other group/person and play chicken to see if you can get them to get out of your way".
    It isn't confusing. It was humor. However, I have rounded corners and encountered riders down who were run off the trail by other riders, so maybe it's not. . . .
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  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    Can't say... maybe it's more of a blue state problem??!!
    I think you might be on to something. . .
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  8. #108
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    So glad I live in a place with more trails than people using them...

    Really enjoyed the KC hill climbing bit, made my day...
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/1" Slicks and a Rack on the Back

  9. #109
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    Here in the UK, everyone apologises and while trying to move out of the way but ending up going the same way as the other person.

    So nobody moves and everyone loses - but at least everyone is equal!

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasualMTBuk View Post
    Here in the UK, everyone apologises and while trying to move out of the way but ending up going the same way as the other person.

    So nobody moves and everyone loses - but at least everyone is equal!
    Yeah, well if you ppl drove on the RIGHT side of the road, you'd know which lane you should be in. We Americans are very easily confused.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Depends on what side of the equator you are on.
    Is this about driving or toilet bowls this time?

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Is this about driving or toilet bowls this time?
    Reference post #108 to determine your own conclusion.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Re View Post
    I think equestrians should have to yield to all other users as they are riding atop massive dumb beasts and most of them lack the ability to think beyond fear/flight.
    Youíve got it wayyyy wrong in saying ďEquestrians should yield to allĒ. You got it right that they are atop a large dumb beasts. The problem is that horses are skittish to movement and very dangerous to the rider and those around them if they get startled. Thatís the reason the rules are written as all trail users need to yield to horseback riders. Itís for safety concerns. We as well as hikers need to stop and step off trail and let them by so the horse doesnít get startled. Always step off trail on the downhill side. A horses only natural enemy is a mountain lion, mountain lions attack from above or behind. Horses fear any large live animal [which we can look like] that is above them. Best to yield and step off trail to the downhill side. And it certainly wouldnít hurt our sport if, as they pass we have a cordial hello and have a nice day as they pass.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  14. #114
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    I agree trail etiquette as it exists is bullshit.

    We should all yield to e-bikers.
    Last edited by tealy; 06-29-2018 at 07:05 PM.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I

    Youíve got it wayyyy wrong in saying ďEquestrians should yield to allĒ. You got it right that they are atop a large dumb beasts. The problem is that horses are skittish to movement and very dangerous to the rider and those around them if they get startled. Thatís the reason the rules are written as all trail users need to yield to horseback riders. Itís for safety concerns. We as well as hikers need to stop and step off trail and let them by so the horse doesnít get startled. Always step off trail on the downhill side. A horses only natural enemy is a mountain lion, mountain lions attack from above or behind. Horses fear any large live animal [which we can look like] that is above them. Best to yield and step off trail to the downhill side. And it certainly wouldnít hurt our sport if, as they pass we have a cordial hello and have a nice day as they pass.
    You forgot if they're female tip your hat and say howdy mame....

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    Quote Originally Posted by tealy View Post
    I agree trail etiquette as it exists is bullshit.

    We should all be yielding to e-bikers.
    Huck an E-biker

    Somebody please come up with a funny meme for that?

  17. #117
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    They won't.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    You forgot if they're female tip your helmet and say howdy mame....
    Yeah, fixed that for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by tealy View Post
    They won't.
    Well, you can only lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink...well, until they are thirsty enough, I suppose.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yeah, fixed that for you.
    The women are usually pretty friendly but sometimes the men think they're John Wayne though. Riding a horse isn't very manly unless it's in a rodeo...

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Reference post #108 to determine your own conclusion.
    Well, $hit. I still don't know. I'll ask the next guy I see riding a horse on the left.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Well, $hit. I still don't know. I'll ask the next guy I see riding a horse on the left.
    Clue: There was no horse in this scenario.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I

    Youíve got it wayyyy wrong in saying ďEquestrians should yield to allĒ. You got it right that they are atop a large dumb beasts. The problem is that horses are skittish to movement and very dangerous to the rider and those around them if they get startled. Thatís the reason the rules are written as all trail users need to yield to horseback riders. Itís for safety concerns. We as well as hikers need to stop and step off trail and let them by so the horse doesnít get startled. Always step off trail on the downhill side. A horses only natural enemy is a mountain lion, mountain lions attack from above or behind. Horses fear any large live animal [which we can look like] that is above them. Best to yield and step off trail to the downhill side. And it certainly wouldnít hurt our sport if, as they pass we have a cordial hello and have a nice day as they pass.
    I'm not saying that they should stop and get out of the way, so perhaps yield to all is the wrong way to put it. I do think that when one encounters an equestrian, the best course of action is for all parties to stop. I've spent time atop a horse, though not in years and I never encountered a cyclist whilst riding. I've seen horses that spook over damn near anything and some that wouldn't care if the apocalypse was happening and their handler steered them at it. I just think that there are times when an equestrian needs to realize that some people don't have a damn clue how to act around a horse and that they in fact need to be able to keep their animal under control if the situation arises. If my dog were aggressive, I wouldn't take him to the dog park cause I'd know what was going to happen.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Clue: There was no horse in this scenario.
    Was there anyone with a lead pipe in the conservatory?

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Was there anyone with a lead pipe in the conservatory?

    Last nigh it was Prof Plum with the revolver in the study. True Story, bro.

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    You forgot if they're female tip your hat and say howdy mame....
    It is hit or miss: I used to ride in the Cuayamacas a lot, which is popular with horse folk. One day after climbing up Soapstone grade met a female rider who was quite attractive. I was polite and all, but out of nowhere she yells ďCuyamaca is for horses!Ē. and sprints off. I was surprised but it was still a thing of beauty to watch her ride away.

    Other times out in those mountains I had my cowbell and coming down an 11 mile downhill, which is more like a DH of a thousand climbs, I come fling over a rise and probably 150 yards down trail are 2 horse riders just standing still. My bell was loud enough that it spooked the horses and one bucked the rider off. I came to a screeching halt but still over a hundred yards away and yelled from a distance. the rider was okay and they were not upset when we met up. I apologized profusely and after that went to a smaller bear bell with magnet silencer.


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  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by tealy View Post
    I agree trail etiquette as it exists is bullshit.

    We should all yield to e-bikers.
    And then stuff a stick through their front wheel.

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjsb View Post
    It is hit or miss: I used to ride in the Cuayamacas a lot, which is popular with horse folk. One day after climbing up Soapstone grade met a female rider who was quite attractive. I was polite and all, but out of nowhere she yells ďCuyamaca is for horses!Ē. and sprints off. I was surprised but it was still a thing of beauty to watch her ride away.

    Other times out in those mountains I had my cowbell and coming down an 11 mile downhill, which is more like a DH of a thousand climbs, I come fling over a rise and probably 150 yards down trail are 2 horse riders just standing still. My bell was loud enough that it spooked the horses and one bucked the rider off. I came to a screeching halt but still over a hundred yards away and yelled from a distance. the rider was okay and they were not upset when we met up. I apologized profusely and after that went to a smaller bear bell with magnet silencer.


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    Had a flat one time and was walking back to the trail head since it was less than a half mile and I was done for the day and didn't feel like doing a trail fix when I was passed on the jeep road I was on by three equestrian riders two ladies one guy riding last. When he passed he hit me with the switch he had for his horse. I told him to watch it, his response after he was already past was to turn around and try to get his horse to push me around. The horse wasn't willing to do that (apparently smarter than it's rider) while my response was inviting him to climb down but he wasn't willing to do that lol.. anyway they rode off with me yelling some not to kind names at him. Had to be embarrassing for him in front of the ladies.. lol

  29. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Re View Post
    I'm not saying that they should stop and get out of the way, so perhaps yield to all is the wrong way to put it. I do think that when one encounters an equestrian, the best course of action is for all parties to stop. I've spent time atop a horse, though not in years and I never encountered a cyclist whilst riding. I've seen horses that spook over damn near anything and some that wouldn't care if the apocalypse was happening and their handler steered them at it. I just think that there are times when an equestrian needs to realize that some people don't have a damn clue how to act around a horse and that they in fact need to be able to keep their animal under control if the situation arises. If my dog were aggressive, I wouldn't take him to the dog park cause I'd know what was going to happen.
    The very reason why all should yield to equestrians. Such an unpredictable animal in the hands of riders that are unpredictable in the control of their horse. The way itís written, all yield to equestrians only makes sense for less chance of an out of control skittish horse hurting someone.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  30. #130
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    It's all fun and games until someone gets stepped on by a horse...

    No seriously. I have been and that shit hurts.
    Life is too short to ride a bike you don't love.

  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redhotrotor View Post
    Last nigh it was Prof Plum with the revolver in the study. True Story, bro.
    Always meant to learn to play that game at some point just to see what all the hype is about.

  32. #132
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    Rule 1: Use discretion and donít be a dick

    That resolves most issues.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by NesquikNinja View Post
    Rule 1: Use discretion and donít be a dick

    That resolves most issues.
    In that order?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  34. #134
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    This is why it matters.

    We just lost one.

    We just lost access to an amazing epic trail because DHers are not giving way and acting like a$$es. Because they blow by hikers at mach 5 and don't pull off for them, because they don't thank the hikers that do pull off, because they don't slow down when passing, because they act like everyone should get out of their way.


    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0189099.jpg

    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0159076.jpg

    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0157411.jpg

    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0147373.jpg

    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0167417.jpg

    Trail use etiquette - outdated and BS-g0247510.jpg
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  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This is why it matters.
    That is a fantastic trail! Very similar to some of the things you'll find in Scotland. Hills like that are swarming with hikers here. Bikes are few and I've never seen or heard of anyone behaving the way you describe. Generally we all give each other room and are very friendly to each other. To be honest, I think the hill-walkers are just amazed to see people up there on a bicycle.

    Where you do get aggro from walkers is down on the flat. The grave-dodgers out on the canal path with maps and walking poles, playing at being hikers. They sometimes moan at you.

    The situation in Scotland is very different though. Our rights of access to the countryside are written in law and within reason, we can go were we like. Maybe one of the reasons there are so few conflicts is that everyone knows this, that the other guy has as much right to be there as you do.

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This is why it matters.

    We just lost one.

    I'm sorry your trail got closed but it wasn't because people were acting as the op suggested.
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  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'm sorry your trail got closed but it wasn't because people were acting as the op suggested.
    The OP:

    Talking to others it seems I'm not the only one thinking this way and it really dawned on me when I was explaining trail etiquette to my wife, who has never hiked or ridden off road and she said "that's some BS".
    The rules throghout the US for trail use are that bikers yield to hikers, bikers yield to horses and the downhill biker yields to the uphill rider. In short, as a rider, you're everybody's little bitch.
    That said, he stated that this thread opened his eyes, but there are many many more that feel the way he did, many many many more that don't care and can't be troubled to slow or stop.
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  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The OP:
    You edited out this part-


    Quote Originally Posted by dogdaysunrise View Post
    Now, I want to emphasize that I play by these rules and I'm a very friendly guy, however my thoughts are free and I think this is outdated and total BS.

    ........The only thing that needs to be done as a rider, let's assume these were the new rules, always slow down, especially for hikers, greet them, ask how they're doing and wish them a nice day, because if you don't and you just fly by, insisting on your right of way, you're just a dick.

    I happen to agree with the op, if fact I could have written this^

    As mentioned numerous times in this thread common sense is king and there are times when the "rules" don't necessarily reflect common sense. I often let the downhill rider go by, and vise-versa and it has never been anything but safe and cordial. As a hiker I think it would be silly to make a rider stop for me and would never do it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You edited out this part-





    I happen to agree with the op, if fact I could have written this^

    As mentioned numerous times in this thread common sense is king and there are times when the "rules" don't necessarily reflect common sense. I often let the downhill rider go by, and vise-versa and it has never been anything but safe and cordial. As a hiker I think it would be silly to make a rider stop for me and would never do it.
    And by doing that, you are training less experienced/more ignorant riders to do the wrong thing. I don't make all riders stop for me when hiking, but I adhere to the rules while cycling and generally ride so as not to blow by hikers or force them off the trail. Once you start riding like that, it only takes one encounter to start screwing over everyone else. How many people actually stop 20-100 feet before the opposite direction hiker and let them choose if they want to get off the trail or pass on the trail? My point is that many riders "force the issue" and "force" the other party into being submissive to their use of the trail, maybe unknowingly, maybe knowingly. Again, the point isn't making the world bend to your enjoyment during that specific minute, it's everyone being able to use the trails and have a good time. That means that you will not get an "unbroken" descent every time you go and ride, especially if it's crowded. If you are riding a crowded area, you only have yourself to blame.
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  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    And by doing that, you are training less experienced/more ignorant riders to do the wrong thing. I don't make all riders stop for me when hiking, but I adhere to the rules while cycling and generally ride so as not to blow by hikers or force them off the trail.

    The wrong thing is being polite and safe? I disagree. Using different a protocol does not mean "blowing by hikers" or "forcing them off the trail".

    I just want to reiterate that I think the current rules should remain a failsafe and be always adhered to when in doubt, and that I would never advocate bad manners or any other behavior that could degrade another trail users experience.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    In my experience, most people do what seems sensible at the time, irrespective of any actual rules, confrontations are few and the guilty party obvious. Why does common sense seem to be such a rare commodity today?
    I don't think it is rare as I've never had an issue in practice with others out in the country even though I mostly ride natural trails shared with others. Most people are courteous with each other and warn us if they have dogs further up the trail and we'll tell them how many more are behind us.

    The only issue I've had is people walking backwards up purpose built downhill trails with dogs off the lead despite it being clearly marked up not for walking and what direction it is.
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  42. #142
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    Well said...

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    The wrong thing is being polite and safe? I disagree. Using different a protocol does not mean "blowing by hikers" or "forcing them off the trail".

    I just want to reiterate that I think the current rules should remain a failsafe and be always adhered to when in doubt, and that I would never advocate bad manners or any other behavior that could degrade another trail users experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I just want to reiterate that I think the current rules should remain a failsafe and be always adhered to when in doubt, and that I would never advocate bad manners or any other behavior that could degrade another trail users experience.
    Agreed. We need rules because things get messy when everyone is interpreting the situation in their own way, and thus can't predict how the other party will behave in a potentially dangerous situation. I was happy to see that the OP listened to the reasoning behind the rules in the thread, and changed his mind, and seems to have left feeling less like they are arbitrary rules cramping his style, and more like they were reasonable ways to treat other people. I think this thread demonstrates that the rules aren't the problem, it's communicating them to people who don't understand why they exist, of even that they do exist. Even the wording might be confusing to newcomers. I was encouraging a couple of riders to go ahead and climb uphill past me last night by saying "come on up... yield to the uphill rider" and they were either confused, out of breath, wanted to finally yield to me after running me off the trail while they were riding downhill twice (with all their lights blazing before it was dark...), or didn't want to hear it, but I am going to try saying I'm "yielding to the climbing rider" next time.

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This is why it matters.

    We just lost one.

    We just lost access to an amazing epic trail because DHers are not giving way and acting like a$$es. Because they blow by hikers at mach 5 and don't pull off for them, because they don't thank the hikers that do pull off, because they don't slow down when passing, because they act like everyone should get out of their way.
    Because they act entitled.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  45. #145
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    so we should follow the rules, except when they don't make sense, but don't make that a rule, just use common sense, which seems to be uncommon, esp. among those who don't know the rules (official, and those outlined here).

    got it...we're good
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider View Post
    so we should follow the rules, except when they don't make sense, but don't make that a rule, just use common sense, which seems to be uncommon, esp. among those who don't know the rules (official, and those outlined here).

    got it...we're good
    I'm sure we can come up with a sign to convey this effectively for all trails...
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    Welcome to the real world...

    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider View Post
    so we should follow the rules, except when they don't make sense, but don't make that a rule, just use common sense, which seems to be uncommon, esp. among those who don't know the rules (official, and those outlined here).

    got it...we're good

  48. #148
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    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    This has always happened to me when I was going uphill, not downhill. I usually hear them coming down before I see them, and immediately stop and get off on the side of the trail for them. I DO NOT want them to have their fun downhill ride ruined. They took the time to climb the hill and now it's their reward to go down. I understand that and I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    If it's a 2-way trail that's a problem. A rider should always be ready and able to control their speed and expecting someone to jump out of the way is very bad form.
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  50. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
    We get it. Youíre a dumb beginner. With a little more experience, perhaps youíll start to understand the logic behind trail etiquette. You should start by reading this entire thread.


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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    This has always happened to me when I was going uphill, not downhill. I usually hear them coming down before I see them, and immediately stop and get off on the side of the trail for them. I DO NOT want them to have their fun downhill ride ruined. They took the time to climb the hill and now it's their reward to go down. I understand that and I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
    Honestly, do you expect a fallen tree to jump out of the way because a rider is hauling ass on a downhill? No, that rider coming downhill needs to be able to slow or even stop. If the downhill rider is going too fast to stop for a fallen tree, then there's a problem.

    The rules don't exist because of fun. They exist the way they do because of physics and safety. As a rider, it is your responsibility to ride under control. Riding out of control endangers yourself and other trail users. Be they other riders, hikers, horses, or wildlife. On one-way, mtb-only trails, you've got more leeway. Even more if you're talking about closed race courses. But public trails, with 2-way traffic, busy, with multiple user groups? What's acceptable is a far slower speed and increased vigilance for other trail users. Brakes exist for a reason. It isn't everyone else's responsibility to jump out of a downhill rider's way. It's the downhill rider's responsibility to ride safely for the conditions so they can handle rapid changes to those conditions.

    If a downhill rider can't slow down or stop for something unexpected, then there are some things they can do to address that:

    Slow the f*ck down in general.
    Better brakes to shorten stopping distance.
    Better tires for better traction.

  52. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    This has always happened to me when I was going uphill, not downhill. I usually hear them coming down before I see them, and immediately stop and get off on the side of the trail for them. I DO NOT want them to have their fun downhill ride ruined. They took the time to climb the hill and now it's their reward to go down. I understand that and I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
    And, now you have ebikes that are traveling up hill at 10-12 mph
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    here the rule should be: the hikers go hike somewhere else. This is the only park that allows mtn biking, is maintained only by mtn bikers, and there is never a horse there ever. The area is unique in that hikers have literally a hundred other parks littered around the region, most of them much much more impressive, hike-worthy and spectacular, even world-class hike trails than the little corner or woods around the city dump we have for mtn biking.

    Of course I am kidding, I don't mind the hikers. I am an avid hiker too. just I would never want to hike in the mtn bike park (but it is allowed to hike there)

    I am still courteous to the hikers, follow the long-term etiquette because it is so established and easy for everyone to follow.

  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    This has always happened to me when I was going uphill, not downhill. I usually hear them coming down before I see them, and immediately stop and get off on the side of the trail for them. I DO NOT want them to have their fun downhill ride ruined. They took the time to climb the hill and now it's their reward to go down. I understand that and I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
    Because you apparently donít understand the physics behind the rule...

    Say you weigh 170lbs, bike and gear is another 30 (for mathís sake)

    You are descending at 20mph. The kinetic energy you are carrying is 2,674.34 ft-lbs of potential force... enough to severely injure or kill yourself and the person you hit.

    Conversely, the same cyclist traveling uphill at 5mph only has 167.14 ft-lbs of kinetic energy, and if he hits something or someone, the most likely outcome is that heíll simply be stopped...
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  55. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That's really weird that downhill yields to uphill.

    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop. The uphill rider should stop and immediately get out of the way.

    This has always happened to me when I was going uphill, not downhill. I usually hear them coming down before I see them, and immediately stop and get off on the side of the trail for them. I DO NOT want them to have their fun downhill ride ruined. They took the time to climb the hill and now it's their reward to go down. I understand that and I'm just a dumb beginner. Why doesn't everyone else understand that???
    I donít care if Iím going uphill or down. I always yield because I donít trust the stranger to yield for me. It is annoying when Iím going downhill, but itís even more annoying when Iím climbing and lose my momentum because some selfish mofo barreling downhill cares more about his fun than my struggles. Just try to be a decent person. Youíre not the only one trying to have a good time.

  56. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    By the time a downhill rider comes around the blind corner at 8-15 mph and sees an uphill rider 10-20 feet away, they don't even have time to stop.
    There's the problem. Assuming you're on a mixed use trail, you're going too fast around a blind corner. For the sake of your own fun, you're ignoring the possibility there may be a hiker, kids, or another cyclist around that corner. That's wrong. Does it cramp the style of the downhill rider? Sure. But on a shared use trail, everyone has to compromise and watch out for each other to keep it safe for all.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    There's the problem. Assuming you're on a mixed use trail, you're going too fast around a blind corner. For the sake of your own fun, you're ignoring the possibility there may be a hiker, kids, or another cyclist around that corner. That's wrong. Does it cramp the style of the downhill rider? Sure. But on a shared use trail, everyone has to compromise and watch out for each other to keep it safe for all.
    Yup.

    Ripping around blind corners on multi-use trails at high speed is a dick move.
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    I never read these rules before. Guess I didn't need to as I have always rode with courtesy. Maybe it's because I hike to and usually have my kids with me so I understand both perspectives. I yield to everyone if the trail is narrow I stop and make sure we can pass each other safely. If the trail is wide I slow down to the point I can stop in a couple feet if need be. Most every time a hello is exchanged. I've never had a bad incident and I have been riding since 1990. Last time I rode I ran into a summer camp group of kids hiking on a narrow trail. I stopped got off my bike and moved completely off the trail into the bushes until they had all passed. No way was I going to ruin those kids day by being selfish. It was a good water break for my out of shape butt anyway!

    Ride with care and courtesy. Never know when your going to wreck and need that other persons help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The very reason why all should yield to equestrians. Such an unpredictable animal in the hands of riders that are unpredictable in the control of their horse. The way itís written, all yield to equestrians only makes sense for less chance of an out of control skittish horse hurting someone.
    So how is it different from a downhiller? Dangerous, unpredictable, not always in control. By your logic everybody should yield to fast riders going downhill.

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So how is it different from a downhiller? Dangerous, unpredictable, not always in control. By your logic everybody should yield to fast riders going downhill.
    A horse is a dumb brute of a creature, whereas a speeding downhiller is... uh, hmmm...
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So how is it different from a downhiller? Dangerous, unpredictable, not always in control. By your logic everybody should yield to fast riders going downhill.
    Iím going to assume you didnít wear your helmet on your last ride and took a hit to the old noggin.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  62. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So how is it different from a downhiller? Dangerous, unpredictable, not always in control. By your logic everybody should yield to fast riders going downhill.
    I agree, if a horse is riding a bike downhill, you best get out of its way.
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  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So how is it different from a downhiller? Dangerous, unpredictable, not always in control. By your logic everybody should yield to fast riders going downhill.
    He has a point. I'm not always in control, so everyone should yield to me?

    I practice safe yielding for horses, of course, but I also think they (equestrians) have some responsibilities too. Like don't bring a dangerous, unpredictable animal out in public. And clean up its poop. And don't posthole wet trails. And participate in trail maintenance...
    Is this where I write something witty?

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    There's some truly shocking stuff in here. Especially about riders not knowing about or not agreeing with the rule that the downhill rider must yield to the uphill rider. I see and confront guys like this on the most popular trail in my area, which begins with an out and back which leads to a loop. I am seriously worried about my daughter's safety on this section. But I never would have thought that anyone frequenting this forum would be in the dark on this. Or maybe one of the ones I have ripped the shit out of. Silly me.

    If you want to get your strava on, do it on a loop at least, not on an out and back.

  65. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    There's some truly shocking stuff in here. Especially about riders not knowing about or not agreeing with the rule that the downhill rider must yield to the uphill rider.

    I think there's also some misunderstanding here, aside from maybe 1 or 2 outliers I think most here only disagree with the "must" part of what you said. Of course everyone should ride in control and be prepared to stop for anyone or anything on the trail, and yes I agree that the downhill rider has the responsibility to stop in a dangerous situation because they can inflict the most harm.

    That said, on my ride yesterday I was coming down a hill and saw an oncoming rider. I slowed and got ready to pull to the side and then the other rider pulled over and said "come on through!" We exchanged brief pleasantries and remarked on the perfect conditions and went our separate ways. "Rules" were broken but no one was damaged, and the way it was handled made the most sense for that particular situation IMO.
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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I think there's also some misunderstanding here, aside from maybe 1 or 2 outliers I think most here only disagree with the "must" part of what you said. Of course everyone should ride in control and be prepared to stop for anyone or anything on the trail, and yes I agree that the downhill rider has the responsibility to stop in a dangerous situation because they can inflict the most harm.

    That said, on my ride yesterday I was coming down a hill and saw an oncoming rider. I slowed and got ready to pull to the side and then the other rider pulled over and said "come on through!" We exchanged brief pleasantries and remarked on the perfect conditions and went our separate ways. "Rules" were broken but no one was damaged, and the way it was handled made the most sense for that particular situation IMO.
    Yeah, my wife and I were going up Three Candles in Park City the other day. TC is an easy trail, but it has some truly beautiful flow associated with the downhill in a nice open setting. I saw a guy coming from a distance and recommended to my wife that we pull over to let the guy through.
    Usually, in last minute situations, it's less confusing to stay with the "rules of the road", but giving way when you don't have to, and being clear about it, isn't the end of the world!

  67. #167
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    ^^Nice! That's 2 respectful riders using common sense and courtesy.

    It isn't that hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I think there's also some misunderstanding here, aside from maybe 1 or 2 outliers I think most here only disagree with the "must" part of what you said. Of course everyone should ride in control and be prepared to stop for anyone or anything on the trail, and yes I agree that the downhill rider has the responsibility to stop in a dangerous situation because they can inflict the most harm.

    That said, on my ride yesterday I was coming down a hill and saw an oncoming rider. I slowed and got ready to pull to the side and then the other rider pulled over and said "come on through!" We exchanged brief pleasantries and remarked on the perfect conditions and went our separate ways. "Rules" were broken but no one was damaged, and the way it was handled made the most sense for that particular situation IMO.
    Poor choice of words on my part. There are obviously exceptions. The situation you cited is one.

  69. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I agree, if a horse is riding a bike downhill, you best get out of its way.
    Yep they don't stop for nothing... not even to take poop

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Iím going to assume you didnít wear your helmet on your last ride and took a hit to the old noggin.
    Al jokes aside according to ďthe rulesĒ everybody should be in control except equestrians and their pet is also allowed to poop on the trail. Sounds unfair and illogical to me.

  71. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    ...
    That said, on my ride yesterday I was coming down a hill and saw an oncoming rider. I slowed and got ready to pull to the side and then the other rider pulled over and said "come on through!" We exchanged brief pleasantries and remarked on the perfect conditions and went our separate ways. "Rules" were broken but no one was damaged, and the way it was handled made the most sense for that particular situation IMO.
    This what I do as well and some times the up hill rider pulls off. If so I will roll through, but I NEVER expect it. Going downhill I am always watching and listening for riders/hikers etc. Whenever I see one I always slow down yield. I may not stop, but I try slow yield the line. Some times it is an easy stop and others it takes abit more time. I will sometimes tell the uphill rider to keep going as I am slowing down just to let them know I am pulling off even if have not done it just yet, but I want them to keep their momentum going. If the climber rider stops and volunteers to pull off I give them a thank you and roll. It happens some times, but I never expect it. Climbing I expect to get the line, but I am prepared to avoid contact when needed. I always give a thanks when the DH rider pulls off and if they don't I am forced to stop or take really bad line I don't say thank you. Once I was climb on straight 8% grade at 6-7 mph and leading my small group. I called out "rider up" as DH group was coming the other way. Lead guy when flying by at 20mph (that is typical DH speed there) nearly ran me off the trail. Sightlines were fine, but it got narrow and never slowed and I had not turned off line into the bushes he would slammed into me. I knew one the riders in the rest that group and let him know what his lead guy did was not cool. When I get to hikers climbing or descending I always slow. I rarely stop, but will slow and say hello and let them do what they want. 90% of the time they gladly move off the trail and I always say "thank you". When there is room I will ride by, but I am always careful to never go by really fast really close. The more space between me and the hiker the more speed I feel comfortable with as I never want them to feel like I just ran them off the trail. That said coming up behind ear buds suck as most can't hear you coming and even talking to them they are oblivious. That however is just another topic.

    In the end yield means slow down and prepare to stop or adjust lines. It means being respectful of those around you and finding mutually agreed way to pass by with no risk. No need hurt anyone out there and that the main purpose of the rules.
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  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Yeah, my wife and I were going up Three Candles in Park City the other day. TC is an easy trail, but it has some truly beautiful flow associated with the downhill in a nice open setting. I saw a guy coming from a distance and recommended to my wife that we pull over to let the guy through.
    Usually, in last minute situations, it's less confusing to stay with the "rules of the road", but giving way when you don't have to, and being clear about it, isn't the end of the world!
    Good example that sometimes rule are just guidlines. If I am not pushing a climb and just putzing along I have no issues give up a climb to a DH. When I do make it clear what so the DH guy can just keep going.
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  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    Al jokes aside according to ďthe rulesĒ everybody should be in control except equestrians and their pet is also allowed to poop on the trail. Sounds unfair and illogical to me.
    Being realistic here, hikers are in control [using their brain] of where they hike and when to step aside. Mountain bikers are supposed to be in control [using their brain] of the mechanical contraption beneath them. Stating that a living thing with a brain such as a horse be controlled by another living thing such as the human being in every situation is unrealistic. Thatís why the rule of everybody yields to horses is in place.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  74. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Being realistic here, hikers are in control [using their brain] of where they hike and when to step aside. Mountain bikers are supposed to be in control [using their brain] of the mechanical contraption beneath them. Stating that a living thing with a brain such as a horse be controlled by another living thing such as the human being in every situation is unrealistic. Thatís why the rule of everybody yields to horses is in place.
    If itís unrealistic for one group of trail users to be in full control why do you expect it from other groups? Isnít ďthe ruleĒ is whoever has the potential to do more harm should yield to others? If we have the exception from this rule for people riding huge dumb dangerous animals that destroy trails why canít we expect the same for downhillers?

  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    If itís unrealistic for one group of trail users to be in full control why do you expect it from other groups? Isnít ďthe ruleĒ is whoever has the potential to do more harm should yield to others? If we have the exception from this rule for people riding huge dumb dangerous animals that destroy trails why canít we expect the same for downhillers?
    The rule for downhillers is that they yield to a rider climbing or any other trail user coming up. Not sure I get what you are saying, it sounds like you are saying that downhillers have the right of way. Pretty simple rules that have been in place for decades.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The rule for downhillers is that they yield to a rider climbing or any other trail user coming up. Not sure I get what you are saying, it sounds like you are saying that downhillers have the right of way. Pretty simple rules that have been in place for decades.
    Just to be clear, I think all the trail users should be in control all the time. And I try to practice common sense approach, if people let me pass when Iím going downhill, Iíll pass, but Iíll brake to a reasonable speed and thank them.
    What I was trying to say before is if we follow the logic that everybody should yield to horses, by the same logic everybody should yield to downhillers too. And it does not make a lot of sense. But you canít expect people to follow rules if you have illogical exemptions from them.

  77. #177
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    You would hate my local trails, all 4 have equestrians, never had an issue just by using common sense, and knowing I don't own the trail.
    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    Just to be clear, I think all the trail users should be in control all the time. And I try to practice common sense approach, if people let me pass when Iím going downhill, Iíll pass, but Iíll brake to a reasonable speed and thank them.
    What I was trying to say before is if we follow the logic that everybody should yield to horses, by the same logic everybody should yield to downhillers too. And it does not make a lot of sense. But you canít expect people to follow rules if you have illogical exemptions from them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    You would hate my local trails, all 4 have equestrians, never had an issue just by using common sense, and knowing I don't own the trail.

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    Probably I hate fresh horse shit on the trails with passion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    Probably I hate fresh horse shit on the trails with passion.
    Yeah, try sheep shit (which they have in Switzerland) you'll learn to love horses!

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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    Just to be clear, I think all the trail users should be in control all the time. And I try to practice common sense approach, if people let me pass when Iím going downhill, Iíll pass, but Iíll brake to a reasonable speed and thank them.
    What I was trying to say before is if we follow the logic that everybody should yield to horses, by the same logic everybody should yield to downhillers too. And it does not make a lot of sense. But you canít expect people to follow rules if you have illogical exemptions from them.
    I appreciate, as do many Iím sure that you portray common courtesy to others while out. But because there is a rule in place that all should yield to equestrians there should also be a rule that all yield to downhillers. Itís apples and oranges. Downhillers are human and should know the trail etiquette rules with control of their own actions. Horses are animals, they donít know human rules. They are unpredictable creatures with human influence to stay in control yet with a mind of their own.

    Just because a downhiller is at speed and is more dangerous than a rider climbing or a hiker hiking does not mean all should yield the right of way to a bombing downhiller. If that were the rule and every trail had riders bombing every downhill without regard to other trail users, how safe would the trails be? And how many more in each user group would hate us even more? The rules are there not just to keep things safe but to keep peace between groups. I sure as hell wouldnít want to be hiking along on a peaceful afternoon by myself or with loved ones and have some YAHOO downhiller going Mach I without regard to all others. Sorry but that shit doesnít fly to keep cordial relations between groups. Our sport is the fastest moving most dangerous of them all. We are in control of our actions, equestrians not always.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  81. #181
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    One of the interesting (and misunderstood, I believe) rules is "stopping" for horses. I was called out by another mountain bike rider for not stopping for an oncoming horse. This was on a fire road and I was climbing and on the opposite side of the trail from the desc ending. Another bike rider was approaching from behind the horse and was slowing to a stop.

    As I approached the horse, I spoke to the lady on the horse and exchanged pleasantries and it was all very polite. As I got by, the other cyclist said, "hey, you're supposed to stop for that horse".

    Um... no! I've had plenty of conversations with equestrians over the years and almost all agree that the best thing to do is talk to them. That way the horse associates a human with the bike and not just a noisy, shiny, mechanical object. If the horse is sketchy, the rider will tell you and ask you to please stop. That has almost never happened.
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  82. #182
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    I get this! I still stop but more than once the person on the horse gives me the green light, but by then I've stopped, and just cruise by. I also "greet" the horse..I like horses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    One of the interesting (and misunderstood, I believe) rules is "stopping" for horses. I was called out by another mountain bike rider for not stopping for an oncoming horse. This was on a fire road and I was climbing and on the opposite side of the trail from the desc ending. Another bike rider was approaching from behind the horse and was slowing to a stop.

    As I approached the horse, I spoke to the lady on the horse and exchanged pleasantries and it was all very polite. As I got by, the other cyclist said, "hey, you're supposed to stop for that horse".

    Um... no! I've had plenty of conversations with equestrians over the years and almost all agree that the best thing to do is talk to them. That way the horse associates a human with the bike and not just a noisy, shiny, mechanical object. If the horse is sketchy, the rider will tell you and ask you to please stop. That has almost never happened.
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  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    One of the interesting (and misunderstood, I believe) rules is "stopping" for horses. I was called out by another mountain bike rider for not stopping for an oncoming horse. This was on a fire road and I was climbing and on the opposite side of the trail from the desc ending. Another bike rider was approaching from behind the horse and was slowing to a stop.

    As I approached the horse, I spoke to the lady on the horse and exchanged pleasantries and it was all very polite. As I got by, the other cyclist said, "hey, you're supposed to stop for that horse".

    Um... no! I've had plenty of conversations with equestrians over the years and almost all agree that the best thing to do is talk to them. That way the horse associates a human with the bike and not just a noisy, shiny, mechanical object. If the horse is sketchy, the rider will tell you and ask you to please stop. That has almost never happened.
    Yes, talking to them as you pass is encouraged. I always do and it does calm the animal, stopping is what youíre supposed to do but going at a snail pace past and reading the riders reactions and response to that, and the horses reactions is fine if the rider is fine with it. You'll no as it is happening. Blowing by an equestrian not so much. Common sense goes a long ways in all of these rules. Every rule is situational but following whats stated when possible is encouraged.

    Depends on the trail also. I ride on equestrian filled trails. Mostly single track is where our encounters happen. Room for one to go by. Guess who goes by first? As I step off trail and talk up an encouraging nice day conversation as they pass.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  84. #184
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    yeha

    must stop for horses and riders

    because they are sitting high in the air and a spooked horse can easily dump the rider and then you have a dead, or paralyzed, or broken bone situation quite easily, when otherwise you could have stopped and make a human voice sound and the horse wouldn't be so scared.

    Who wants to fall off a seat backwards 5 to 7 feet (or more) off the ground ?

    horse traffic where allowed will always take precedence, dead stop. horses = big money to have and maintain...and around my parts (where the minutemen kicked the British arses back to Britain) that is old money, and old money rules over everything in the end. old money = streets, parks, woods with family names on them. no one can f**k with that cabal. folks around here are way more rooting into the landscape and protect the precious public spaces like their own children, because these woods are their children. horse poop ? don't bother it, it won't bother you....or bother it who cares...dog crap is another matter entirely.
    meat eating carnivore vs vegetable eating Budweiser hauler, I'll take the horse crap any day
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  85. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by harold View Post
    honestly, do you expect a grizzly bear to jump out of the way because a rider is hauling ass on a downhill? No, that rider coming downhill needs to be able to slow or even stop. If the downhill rider is going too fast to stop for a grizzly bear, then there's a problem.
    fify.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  86. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    .... horses = big money to have and maintain...and around my parts (where the minutemen kicked the British arses back to Britain) that is old money, and old money rules over everything in the end. old money = streets, parks, woods with family names on them. no one can f**k with that cabal. ...
    So like everywhere in the world whoever has the most money wins They come first and then everybody else.

    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    .... meat eating carnivore vs vegetable eating Budweiser hauler, I'll take the horse crap any day
    I just donít like crap in general and dog shit is easier to avoid.

  87. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    So like everywhere in the world whoever has the most money wins They come first and then everybody else.
    You've just figured this out?
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    You've just figured this out?
    Not really. But I like how the people make up all sorts of stupid reasons why we should yield to horses instead of the only real one.

  89. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    OP, some of your points are valid.

    Although, these set and well known rules have been in place since the early 1990ís. Fighting for change now would be shooting our sport in the foot. We are already and have been for decades in trail use disputes with other trail user groups over use of trails. The wiser choice would be to follow the set of well known rules and be cordial to other trail user groups. The name of the game is to avoid conflict. What you are proposing is conflict 10 fold. To fight for this now would set out sport back at what little respect weíve gained over so many years.
    This ^

    The current Yield System works and is widely known. Not sure about where the OP rides, but in SoCal I have only had one bad encounter with pedestrians when it came to right of way on a MUT in the 20 years I have been riding. Most Pedestrians move to the side and let the bikes pass, and I still slow down for the encounter which is a form of "yielding"

    I wholeheartedly disagree with uphill bike traffic yielding to downhill bike traffic. Downhill should always yield.
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  90. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    fify.
    Haha. No grizz here. Plenty of black bears, though.

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  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjsb View Post
    Other times out in those mountains I had my cowbell and coming down an 11 mile downhill, which is more like a DH of a thousand climbs, I come fling over a rise and probably 150 yards down trail are 2 horse riders just standing still. My bell was loud enough that it spooked the horses and one bucked the rider off. I came to a screeching halt but still over a hundred yards away and yelled from a distance. the rider was okay and they were not upset when we met up. I apologized profusely and after that went to a smaller bear bell with magnet silencer.
    I probably would also have apologized, but that was in no way your fault. That is a horribly skittish horse. some horses spook at the sight of shiny rocks..... Unless ridden regularly they can be very skittish.

    My most recent experience with a horse was when riding up a hill in my local riding area I heard her coming up from behind me and I had to move out of the way so she and her horse could pass..... once at the top of the hill there were a few other riders and we all chatted with her since horses are a rare sight in our area and she was purposely training her horse to be comfortable around mountain bikers. That was pretty rad.
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  92. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    Not really. But I like how the people make up all sorts of stupid reasons why we should yield to horses instead of the only real one.
    The real reason is potentially creating a dangerous situation for the rider.

    The problem that arises sometimes if you're going the same direction and you need to pass to do so you need to get the riders attention (while trying not to spook the horse) so they can basically yield to you...

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    The real reason is potentially creating a dangerous situation for the rider.

    The problem that arises sometimes if you're going the same direction and you need to pass to do so you need to get the riders attention (while trying not to spook the horse) so they can basically yield to you...
    That is the only time that there should ever be a problem while encountering an equestrian. Getting their attention from behind can be a bit tricky. Iíve come up on some before, an encounter last summer comes to mind. I came up on a group of about four equestrians from behind. I saw them off in the distance at about 100í. I slowed down and creeped up on them. Pacing at their speed and about 40í behind. A person would really have to raise their voice in a yell in order for them to hear you over all the noise the horses make just walking along. Just about the time I was going to say something luckily the last rider looked back and noticed me. She alerted the group and they all stopped. I dismounted and walked by after they gave me the okay. But that was after a nice conversation of how our day was.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  94. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    The real reason is potentially creating a dangerous situation for the rider.

    The problem that arises sometimes if you're going the same direction and you need to pass to do so you need to get the riders attention (while trying not to spook the horse) so they can basically yield to you...
    I understand how the horses work. It just if you have huge animal that you canít control in ANY situation, you should not be on a multi use trail. I understand that itís just my opinion, and most of the people are OK with manure on the trail and potential danger of out of control horse.

  95. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    I understand how the horses work. It just if you have huge animal that you canít control in ANY situation, you should not be on a multi use trail. I understand that itís just my opinion, and most of the people are OK with manure on the trail and potential danger of out of control horse.
    Guess who were on the trails long before the mechanical mountain bikes were? Share the road and be cordial to other groups, itís pretty simple and the rules are easily understandable and easy to abide by. Are they perfect? no. Each interaction is situataional. If both use common sense and when possible adhere to the rules maybe our grand kids will be able to enjoy the same trails we did and then some.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  96. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    I understand how the horses work. It just if you have huge animal that you canít control in ANY situation, you should not be on a multi use trail. I understand that itís just my opinion, and most of the people are OK with manure on the trail and potential danger of out of control horse.
    how in hell do you think horses are trained to ignore stuff ? they take them out in the real world after they've been calm on the ranch...and go for a jaunt... FFS
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  97. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    I probably would also have apologized, but that was in no way your fault. That is a horribly skittish horse.
    I don't know, any sensible horse would get spooked if they heard what they thought was a cow barreling down a mountain towards them @30mph.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  98. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by El_Zilcho View Post
    I understand how the horses work. It just if you have huge animal that you canít control in ANY situation, you should not be on a multi use trail. I understand that itís just my opinion, and most of the people are OK with manure on the trail and potential danger of out of control horse.
    Bottom line they have as much right to be there as we do and I don't see that changing so be easier for all if you just adopt a live and let live attitude...

    btw I'm not a huge fan of horses either. Was around them when I was a kid, been kicked, bitten and thrown but to each his own...

  99. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncbuster View Post
    Bottom line they have as much right to be there as we do and I don't see that changing so be easier for all if you just adopt a live and let live attitude...

    btw I'm not a huge fan of horses either. Was around them when I was a kid, been kicked, bitten and thrown but to each his own...
    Coming from the one with a horse for an avatar.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  100. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Coming from the one with a horse for an avatar.
    On a steel horse I ride... actually was an Ironhorse

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