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  1. #1
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    Tour de France in chaos

    anyone else see this?

    Tour de France in chaos after vandals throw nails onto course

    CBBC Newsround - Tour de France in chaos after vandals throw nails onto course

    bummer, I've read that this happened at a local trail here in TX. Believed to be homeowners who owned adjacent properties to the trail. Threw tacks on the trail and around in the parking lot MTB'ers used.

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat

  2. #2
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    Yeah, it was crazy. Kind of cool to see the peleton hold back for the riders who got flats to catch up though. Hopefully we don't see any more of this...

  3. #3
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    It was chaos when it happened, but the riders up the road did the right thing and waited for Evans and the others to get sorted and catch up. Except for Rolland, who made a dick move attacking when everyone had obviously stopped racing. It's refreshing to see a sport where the participants can call time out on their own and get things sorted without instant replay or officials. Kudos to Sky and Liquigas for fair play.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shibby View Post
    Yeah, it was crazy. Kind of cool to see the peleton hold back for the riders who got flats to catch up though. Hopefully we don't see any more of this...
    yes I totally agree that was very cool to slow the pace, others that got screwed could catch up. That's a real competitor in my opinion. (c;

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat

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    Rolland plead ignorance, but I'm not sure I buy that.

    This is my first year really watching the Tour de France, and I have to say that I was extremely refreshed (and frankly surprised) by the level of sportsmanship. Not only was slowing the peloton the "fair" thing to do, but it also negates any advantage the saboteur may have been hoping to give someone, if that was the motive. However, if it was some guy just being a dick, there's not much you can do about that.

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    There is no ignorance when you have team radios in your ear. He knew exactly what he was doing and feels no remorse. It was a very French move. I also agree with their decision to continue on without Evans after he had to stop a third time. It was very unfortunate.
    "Your opinion may vary, but it's stupid." -Rich Dillen

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul.C View Post
    There is no ignorance when you have team radios in your ear. He knew exactly what he was doing and feels no remorse. It was a very French move. I also agree with their decision to continue on without Evans after he had to stop a third time. It was very unfortunate.
    ya too bad they can't do like they do in Nascar, and put DICK Dastardly Rolland at the tail end of the longest line (c;

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat

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    Yes - have been watching - Cycling has a very high level of sportsmanship. Hard to imagine that everyone thinks these guys are doping.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ky Chucky View Post
    Hard to imagine that everyone thinks these guys are doping.
    Huh? Here's a short list from 2006 alone. Just one year out of over 1 hundred years of cycling.

    Reference: List of doping cases in cycling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    2006
    Wilmer Bravo of Venezuela tested positive for Prednisolone and Prednisone on 9 January 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 4 months".[267]
    Garcia Quesada Adolfo of Spain tested positive for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in competition on 19 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Stephen Alfred of the USA, tested positive for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in an 'out of season' test on 26 March, and an 'in competition' test on 10 June 2006. Further tests indicated that his testosterone imbalance resulted from the presence of exogenous testosterone. He was suspended for 8 years by the USADA.[286] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 8 years."[248]
    Victor Hernandez Baeta of Spain tested positive for EPO in an 'out of competition' test on 4 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Ivan Basso was expelled from the Tour de France in the week prior to its commencement due to his involvement in the Operación Puerto doping case[287] On 30 April 2007 Team Discovery Channel announced that Basso would be released from his contract on Basso's request.[288] While still claiming to never have actually engaged in blood doping, Basso admitted contacting Dr. Fuentes' clinic with the intention to engage in blood doping.[289] On 15 June 2007, Basso received a two-year ban.
    Pawal Bentkowski of Poland tested positive for Norandrosterone on 25 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    Jaime Bretti of Chile tested positive for Phentermine in competition on 4 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Santos Gonzalez Capilla of Spain tested positive for Triamcinolone acetonide on 4 March 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification, warning and reprimand".[267]
    Jose Balague Carvajal of Chile tested positive for Ephedrine 'in competition' on 11 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Erick Castano of Ecuador tested positive for Metelonone on 14 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    Luis Coehlo of Portugal tested positive for Norandrosterone, Clenbuterol, and hCG in competition on 15 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and Ineligibility for 1 year".[248]
    Juan Cotumba of Bolivia tested positive for Benzoylecgonine, methylecgonine, and cocaine metabolites on 11 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    Jhon ****o of Peru tested positive for Norandrosterone in competition on November 9, 2006. he UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Kamil Dominian of Poland tested positive for Stanozolol on May 20, 2006. The 'Union Cycliste Internationale' (UCI) summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    David Garbelli of Italy tested positive for Triamcinolone acetonide and salbutamol on 9 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and warning".[267]
    Christoph Girschweiler of Switzerland tested positive for Salbutamol and salmeterol in competition on 21 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and warning".[248]
    Aitor González, the winner of the 2002 Vuelta a España, tested positive twice in 2005, first during an out of competition test in August, and again during the 2005 Vuelta a España for a methyltestosterone metabolite. González claimed that the positive test was the result of a contaminated dietary supplement called Animal Pack prescribed by a doctor.[290] González was handed a two year ban and retired soon afterwards. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed 17 alpha methyl, 5 beta androstane, 3 alpha 17 beta dio and a 2 year ban[267]
    Oscar Grau of Spain tested positive for Finasteride. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    Jon Pena Hernaez of Spain tested positive for Phentermine in competition on 1 August 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Christina Alcade Huertanos from Spain was disqualified for 2 years. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed Triamcinolone acetonide and a 2 year ban[267]
    Jörg Jaksche was one of the 9 riders held out of the 2006 Tour de France after being identified by investigators in the Operación Puerto investigation. On 30 June 2007 Jaksche admitted he was guilty of blood doping and that he was the Bella mentioned in the documents confiscated from Fuentes' clinic.[291][292]
    Valdimir Koev of Bulgaria tested positive for Stanozolol on 18 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    Rafal Kumorowski of Poland tested positive for Cannabis in competition on 4 August 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and warning."[248]
    Floyd Landis was fired from the Phonak team on 5 August 2006, after a test result indicated an abnormally high testosterone/epitestosterone ratio[293] after stage 17 of the 2006 Tour de France. On 20 September 2007, he was stripped of his title as winner of the 2006 Tour and placed under a two year ban from professional racing, following an arbitration panel's 2 to 1 ruling. He appealed the result of the arbitration hearing to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, which subsequently upheld the panel's ruling. He remained suspended until 30 January 2009.
    Maxime Lefebvre of France 'Failed to Comply' with the 'in competition' testing on 29 December 2006 and 2 January 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for life".[248]
    Christian Luce of France. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed Testosterone and a 3 year ban[267]
    Joseph M. Papp of the USA tested positive for metabolites of testosterone or its precursors (6?-OH-androstenedione 6?-OH-androsterone) on 7 May 2006, at the International 42nd Presidential Cycling Tour of Turkey. He received a 2 year suspension. When he testified for the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) at the Floyd Landis trial he also stated that he had graduated to testosterone after starting on EPO (erythropoietin) in 2001.[294]
    Evandro Luis Portela of Brazil tested positive for Phentermine and Stanozolol on 23 March 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for life".[267]
    Aitor Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Aitor's brother, Unai Osa, number 8 to Aitor Osa himself.[295]
    Unai Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Unai Osa himself, and number 8 to his brother Aitor Osa.[295]
    Cénéric Racault of France tested positive for Prednisolone and Prednisone. IThe UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 18 months".[267]
    Ilaria Rinaldi of Italy tested positive for Testosterone in competition on 18 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Jose Antonio Pastor Roldan of Spain tested positive for Terbutaline on 19 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and a warning'.[267]
    Alexandre Sabalin of Moldavia tested positive for Strychnine on 26 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and Ineligibility for 1 year'.[267]
    Michele Scarponi was implicated in the Operación Puerto case. On 8 May 2007, Scarponi confessed his role in the case.[296] On 15 May, Scarponi was provisionally suspended.[297]
    Ger Soeperberg of the Netherlands tested positive for Salbutamol on 2 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and warning'.[267]
    Alvaro Tardaguila from Uruguay tested positive for r-EPO in February 2006, and received a 2 year ban.[298]
    Fernando Torres of Spain tested positive for Ephedrine in competition on 8 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years - (under appeal by rider)."[248]
    Matteo Trentin of Italy tested positive for Salbutamol 'in competition' on 26 December 2007. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[248]
    Jan Ullrich was expelled from the Tour de France in the week prior to its commencement due to his involvement in the Operación Puerto doping case.[287]
    Sascha Urweider was suspended by Team Phonak after a positive A-test for testosterone. Urweider blamed a nutritional supplement he bought without team doctors advise.[299]
    Tristan Valentin of France tested positive for Heptaminol on 6 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 6 months".[267]
    Jordi Reira Valls of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol and hCG on 16 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years".[267]
    2006 Tour de France was marred by doping scandals. Prior to the tour, numerous riders - including the two favourites Jan Ullrich and Ivan Basso - were expelled from the Tour due to their link with the Operación Puerto doping case. After the end of the race, the apparent winner Floyd Landis was found to have failed a drug test after stage 17; Landis contested the result and demanded arbitration. On 20 September 2007 Landis was found guilty and suspended retroactive to 30 January 2007 and stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title making Óscar Pereiro the title holder.[300]
    Operación Puerto doping case (meaning Operation Mountain Pass)[287] is a Spanish doping case against doctor Eufemiano Fuentes and a number of accomplices, started in May 2006. He is accused of administering prohibited doping products to 200 professional athletes, to enhance their performance. Tour de France's favorites Jan Ullrich and Ivan Basso were expelled from the Tour de France before the race started.

  10. #10
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    my comment was somewhat sarcastic. - slow down for tacks when everyone is watching, but do anything to gain and advantage when no one is looking. - - very interesting behavior.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gnewcomer View Post
    bummer, I've read that this happened at a local trail here in TX. Believed to be homeowners who owned adjacent properties to the trail. Threw tacks on the trail and around in the parking lot MTB'ers used.
    I was a victim of this tack attack (tiny razor sharp carpet tacks) and flatted about 15 seconds into the ride at Walnut Creek. As I recall this was in mid or late October, when the days were getting much shorter. More likely done by those who were annoyed by mtn bikers riding at night, disturbing the late evening/night gay cruising scene (a chronic problem at this park for many, many years). I had just gotten lights and was so excited about my first night ride, then all of us flatted. I think this was maybe 10 or so years ago.

    Re: Tour de France, hard to imagine that this tack attack could have gone unseen. Hope they catch the guys.

  12. #12
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    really unfortunate. especially since the tacks seemed to have eyes and took out the best riders in the race. evans flatted 3 times, craziness.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ky Chucky View Post
    Hard to imagine that everyone thinks these guys are doping.
    You must be new to road cycling. I don't want to have this thread get hijacked into a doping thread but as a roadie I know dopers and have known dopers since the 1980's.

    If you don't believe me just take this quote from LA as proof : "20+ year career. 500 drug controls worldwide, in and out of competition. Never a failed test. I rest my case."

    He might as well have said "I've never got caught cheating on my wife"
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ky Chucky View Post
    my comment was somewhat sarcastic. - slow down for tacks when everyone is watching, but do anything to gain and advantage when no one is looking. - - very interesting behavior.
    Ahh...sarcasm does not usually evade me, as I provide a lot of it myself. You got me on that one though.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnewcomer View Post
    anyone else see this?

    Tour de France in chaos after vandals throw nails onto course

    CBBC Newsround - Tour de France in chaos after vandals throw nails onto course

    bummer, I've read that this happened at a local trail here in TX. Believed to be homeowners who owned adjacent properties to the trail. Threw tacks on the trail and around in the parking lot MTB'ers used.

    gnewcomer aka OldMtnGoat
    Choas is not the right word....

    I beleive Le Tour has a back up plan for lots of contigiencies.....this was just one...and they worked it to perfection the race result was not compromised.

  16. #16
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnewcomer View Post
    ya too bad they can't do like they do in Nascar, and put DICK Dastardly Rolland at the tail end of the longest line (c;
    He will pay the price, don't worry. I'll bet you that for the next couple of years every time Rolland tries to break away from the main group he will be reeled back in, no matter how little he matters in the overall standings. He made it onto the pro bikers **** list and they will make sure he doesn't forget it any time soon.

  17. #17
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    Wiggins had no choice but to tell the peloton to slow down. He would have gotten tons of $hit if they attacked just like Contador got when Schleck dropped a chain and he kept going.
    Atomic batteries to power...turbines to speed...

  18. #18
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    Well....

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul.C View Post
    There is no ignorance when you have team radios in your ear. He knew exactly what he was doing and feels no remorse. It was a very French move. I also agree with their decision to continue on without Evans after he had to stop a third time. It was very unfortunate.
    I don't think they decided to continue without Evans. I think they caught Rolland, offered to add a frame pump to his wheelset and then pulled up and waited for BMC to rejoin the lead group.

    Ken
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

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    Best part of the whole tour so far in my opinion was the previous stage where Wiggins was the lead out man for another Sky Sprinter......bad azz and classy. Hope he can keep the yellow.

  20. #20
    It's about showing up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul.C View Post
    It was a very French move.

    Agreed. When it looked bad for them and he got caught they were saved.
    I don't rattle.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ky Chucky View Post
    Hard to imagine that everyone thinks these guys are doping.
    List of doping cases in cycling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Nothing to see here. Move along.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    I don't think they decided to continue without Evans. I think they caught Rolland, offered to add a frame pump to his wheelset and then pulled up and waited for BMC to rejoin the lead group.

    Ken
    When I wrote that comment I had just gotten to the part where the peleton regained speed to catch frenchie. You could see their pace quicken. I also agree that Wiggins and his team are doing a fantastic job of leading the TDF this year. Wiggins leading his man out for an attempt at the stage win! That is very classy. Ron Burgundy would approve. Also, evans seemed very grateful to team Sky for their efforts in keeping the peleton together and ensuring BMC made it back to the group for the finish.

  23. #23
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    That's messed up. But to go O/T I think they should just let the athletes dope up with whatever they want. No longer an issue to waste our time and tax payer $ (when talking baseball) and then we can have superhumans.

    Legalize It!

  24. #24
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    It sucks that any conversation about cylcing ends up with doping comments.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by crewjones View Post
    It sucks that any conversation about cylcing ends up with doping comments.

    Just like any conversation about hikers and horses ends up with "why can't they pick up horse crap?"
    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

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