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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    TOP TEN LIST - most important to upgrade

    say you got a decent run of the mill mtb, ride all mountain / XC...
    what are the ten most important bike elements to upgrade, in order of importance?

    1) wheelset
    2) crank
    3) pedals
    4) fork
    5) rear suspension (if applicable)
    6) adjustable seatpost
    7) brakes
    8) comfy saddle
    9) carbon bottle holder
    10) get new carbon frame

    11) win lottery

    hmm, forgot rear derailleur ect... going 11-36 and what not...

  2. #2
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    My first and foremost upgrade is a freakin huge horn on the front! Blast your fellow riders as you leave 'em in your dust! Second, grip streamers! When you fly past your rivals, they cry knowing they got dusted by the streamer guy! Third, and final upgrade....supersonic noise maker on the bars so when you run into Sasquatch (ride long enough and you will) you can scare him into the bush and he won't steal your granola bar.

  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex(K)
    say you got a decent run of the mill mtb, ride all mountain / XC...
    what are the ten most important bike elements to upgrade, in order of importance?

    1) wheelset
    2) crank
    3) pedals
    4) fork
    5) rear suspension (if applicable)
    6) adjustable seatpost
    7) brakes
    8) comfy saddle
    9) carbon bottle holder
    10) get new carbon frame

    11) win lottery

    hmm, forgot rear derailleur ect... going 11-36 and what not...
    #1: Rider skills
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    #1: Rider skills
    #2 loose 15 lbs.

  5. #5
    Five is right out
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    The engine.

  6. #6
    AKA Dr.Nob
    Reputation: gumbymark's Avatar
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    This is why I spend the coin on getting the bike the way I want from the start. Don't need to "upgrade" anything.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  7. #7
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    10 would be a down grade if you already have a titanium steed.

  8. #8
    Blue Pig
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumbymark
    This is why I spend the coin on getting the bike the way I want from the start. Don't need to "upgrade" anything.
    No fun in that!
    I give positive rep all around but then I get negative rep from all the clowns.

  9. #9
    Misses elastomer shocks
    Reputation: suprcivic's Avatar
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    6) adjustable seatpost
    i tend to think that adjustable seatposts are completely unnecessary weight. are you going to tell me that you can't scoot your butt behind the saddle?

    1. tires
    2. clipless pedals

    the rest depends on the bike and is usually unnecessary.

    you can't beat the weight savings and performance change of an upgraded set of tires for the money. even if you paid double what the tires are worth, you will never feel the performance difference in a bike more than swapping tires vs dollars spent.

    pedals are a personal preference, but i think clipless offers a huge increase in bike control. 'nuff said

    that being said, i love upgrading and wrenching. i have so many upgrades on my bike that made absolutely zero performance enhancements its not even funny. let's all face it, can you really feel the performance difference between an XT and XTR front derailleur?
    _________________
    Downhill is easy.

  10. #10
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex(K)
    #2 loose 15 lbs.
    That is on my upgrade list.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  11. #11
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    Importance really depends on what is on your bike now. There really is no such thing as "run of the mill."

  12. #12
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    Upgrades are expensive so I try to buy the bike the way I want it right from the start. The rest is up to me ie improve my skills. Nothing like blinged out bike being ridden by a slow poke!!

  13. #13
    Ride Instigator
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    I'm with Shiggy and Alex...upgrading your physical condition is what makes the most noticable difference.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twenty Times
    Importance really depends on what is on your bike now. There really is no such thing as "run of the mill."
    good point. i guess the question is more generally about what you feel is most important to spend money on. crank guy vs. seatpost guy vs. brooks saddle guy

  15. #15
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    Wheels and tires, contact points (saddle, pedals, bars), possibly fork. Of course, this all depends on what's on your bike now. If you've got a low end wheelset with poor tires this might be a decent upgrade. One good thing about wheels and tires is you can usually move them from one bike to another. If your wheels are already mid level or above, not much to be gained. You might get some improvement from tires that are better suited to your terrain and riding style but that's assuming your current tires aren't doing the job.

    Contact points should only be upgraded if there's something wrong with how they fit you now. If your saddle is killing you then get one that fits better. If your position on the bike isn't working then a new set of bars (and stem if necessary) might make a difference. Definitely clipless pedals, but if you've already got a pair there isn't a lot to be gained from getting a different pair, they all work pretty good.

    Finally, fork. Again, if your's is a low end fork then you would notice a difference in just about all phases of riding if it was replaced by a better fork. However, forks are costly.

    Assuming the rest of your stuff is Deore class or higher, upgrade when it breaks.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
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    1. Ride more.
    2. Ride more.
    3. Ride more.
    4. Ride more.
    5. Ride more.
    6. Ride more
    7. Ride more.
    8. Ride more.
    9. Ride more.
    10. Replace/upgrade parts when/if I break them.
    Signature

  17. #17
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    #1: Rider skills
    *ding*
    :wq

  18. #18
    Is that Bill rated?
    Reputation: Lord Humongous's Avatar
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    If you are looking to buy hardgoods and take them home I have always found contact points worth the dough.
    1) Tires, nothing changes the way your bike rides as fast as tires. This is where your bike touches the ground so all cornering, braking and drive actions that you perform go through your tires. Find out what other people who ride your trails have good experiences with and get the best quality beads, casing and compound that you can.
    2) Saddle, if you don't find your saddle comfortable chances are good that there is another saddle on the market that you will.
    3) Grips, thinner grips if you get sore in your thumb/palm joint, softer/thicker grips if you get sore palms. Ergon has grips that do both.
    4) Brake pads, many brakes come stock with resin pads and switching them out for sintered can dramatically alter your stopping power.
    5) Shoes, often overlooked, but worth some money. If you clip in and seldom walk anything, get some carbon soles, the increased stiffness is a real improvement. If you use flats, get some of the newer engineered rubber sole shoes such as FiveTen or Shimano are offering.
    6) Set up. This may or may not involve dollars, but trying some different stems, bar sweeps, bar tilts, seat post set back, brake lever set up, etc can alter your position on the bike allowing for better handling, stronger pedaling and less fatigue. Many people just ride their bikes the way they came, thinking that good enough is good enough. What they don't realize is that for just a little effort and maybe some new parts good enough can become great or even amazing
    7) Wheels. Rotating weight is always nice to lose and a light set of wheels can really liven up your pedalling. I left this later on the list due to the ridiculous prices on most quality wheelsets.
    8) Forks. Upgrading from entry level forks can dramatically alter the damping quality as well as reducing overall weight. This depends on what you define as a run of the mill XC/AM bike though, many bikes come stock with forks that are good and don't need to be replaced.
    9) Chain lube. I know it sounds cheesy, but many people in my area just use whatever and end up with an oily, dirt paste all over their drive components. Switching to something like White Lightning, Purple Extreme or Boeshield T9 can reduce drivetrain wear, improve shifting and prevent unsightly grease marks.
    10) There is no ten, but I would say if you still want to spend money on your bike after the other nine, spoil it. Take your bike on vacation and ride somewhere new.
    Well, it was a good try.

  19. #19
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    I've come to appreciate seat upgrades. Seats are place companies can save bucks on stock bikes so they are often not up to par with the rest of the bike. Upgrading to a higher quality seat can save a surprising amount of weight and make riding much more enjoyable if you find one that fits your arse well. If you're rear isn't sore the day after a long ride you can go riding again the next day and get the additional upgrade of ride more ride more ride more.

  20. #20
    Single Speed Junkie
    Reputation: crux's Avatar
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    1. Increase usable and controlled power while increasing endurance.
    2. Increase flexability.

  21. #21
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    1. Bigger Lungs
    2. Stronger Legs
    3. Develop larger scabs and bruises on legs and arms
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  22. #22
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    Riding a california beach bike with a horn /streamers ,huge white walls that kicks all your ass and waves by by LMAO ........................................J/K

    Overall ride comfort # 1

    # 2 get all those listed narrow it down , do some home work , get the best deal ,go for it and ride on and stay safe ..

    As for the lottery , ehhhhh good luck..

  23. #23
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    I think the number one upgrade is a light weight tubeless wheelset with Stan's Rims so you go tubless with high performance XC tires. This will take off anywhere from 2-3 lbs of weight off the bike and make you feel like you have wings.

  24. #24
    Truly Doneski
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    1 Wheelset and tires.
    2 Contact points.
    3 Not on the bike really, but a good comfortable pair of cycling gloves. Solid gloves with solid grips reduces fatigues for me a lot

  25. #25
    mtbr member
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    but a good comfortable pair of cycling gloves. Solid gloves with solid grips reduces fatigues for me a lot
    What kind of gloves to yo prefer GFAthens?

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