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Thread: Taco anyone?

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    Taco anyone?

    Bent it earlier today. Took a corner a little too fast, tire washed out and down I went. Check bike first, then me. So I had to walk a mile or so back to my car. Luckily it was a wonderful day to take your bike for a walk, or what little walking it could do...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Taco anyone?-20121223_123209.jpg  

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  2. #2
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    Well theres your problem right there. Your running an Aspen on the front. How big a boy are you to thrash a front rim like that? Also, what rim you running? Are you telling the entire story?

    Thankfully the rider was OK. I generally check the bike first after going down as well. Keep the rubber side down.

  3. #3
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    Do note that when the wheel is that bent, it's toast, but you can usually get it straight enough to ride home by removing it and banging it on the pavement.

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    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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    if your tight on money my bet would be a shop could get it straight enough to ride. the integrity of the wheel would probably compromised and id replace it as soon as i could but just for a stop gap...

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    Im about 5'-9" or around there, 200-210 pounds it varies daily for some reason... The rim is an alexrims TD25, both front and rear same rim and tire. As far as I know that's the entire story, or I may have fallen because of a rock in the turn. I really don't know. Maybe my wight wasn't leaned in the right direction. I was the only rider within the area so I had no one to say what happened. I did have a short thought about banging it against a nearby tree, but knowing my luck I would just snap the rim in half or catch the tree on fire or something. The rear wheel is also a hair bent, but easily ride able. I just got them trued last weekend too...

    Im not tight on money whatsoever, so any suggestions on new rims and tire combos are welcome.
    Slightly faster than a speeding snail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Atcher View Post
    Im about 5'-9" or around there, 200-210 pounds it varies daily for some reason... The rim is an alexrims TD25, both front and rear same rim and tire. As far as I know that's the entire story, or I may have fallen because of a rock in the turn. I really don't know. Maybe my wight wasn't leaned in the right direction. I was the only rider within the area so I had no one to say what happened. I did have a short thought about banging it against a nearby tree, but knowing my luck I would just snap the rim in half or catch the tree on fire or something. The rear wheel is also a hair bent, but easily ride able. I just got them trued last weekend too...

    Im not tight on money whatsoever, so any suggestions on new rims and tire combos are welcome.
    You fell because you're running an aspen in the front and you're +200 lbs. One of my sub-150 lbs friends ran an aspen in the rear and he said it slid all over the place. Try a Cross-mark, racing ralph, or fast trak.

    As for wheels: Stan's Arch EX rims with King/hope hubs and some sapim or dt to hold it all together.
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

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    oh, i love spending other peoples money on bike stuff! at your size an arch ex would be fine but id probably go with a flow. mavic 521 and wtb i23 are also great options. as for tires it really depends, if you wanna keep it rolling quick you could try a ground control or nobby nic.

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    I have been feeling like these tires have been wanting to slip even at low speeds. I have been looking at getting some new tires, but I didnt know what. Now I at least have a general direction to go to.

    Thanks for the input everyone. Ill try to keep yall updated to where Im going for more guidance and whatnot.
    Slightly faster than a speeding snail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    oh, i love spending other peoples money on bike stuff! at your size an arch ex would be fine but id probably go with a flow. mavic 521 and wtb i23 are also great options. as for tires it really depends, if you wanna keep it rolling quick you could try a ground control or nobby nic.
    Those are solid options, but I would never run them on my bike. Too heavy for this application.

    When there are 100mm forks involved, Nobby nics/ground controls are overkill along with flows.
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

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    what does travel have to do with tread? both are sub 700g and pretty middle of the road aggressiveness wise. id stick with a crossmark in the rear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    what does travel have to do with tread? both are sub 700g and pretty middle of the road aggressiveness wise. id stick with a crossmark in the rear.
    Travel has to do with it because a 100mm fork is XC material. Nobby Nic is pushing it for XC. To me, thats more of a "trail" tire. RaRa's and RoRo's are schwalbe's XC material (and furious fred of course) while renegades and fast traks are spesh's XC rubber.
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    Since when does travel indicate how a bike should be ridin? As far as I can tell, I out ride alot of my friends and they all ride all mountain full suspension. Im on a 90mm hardtail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    Since when does travel indicate how a bike should be ridin? As far as I can tell, I out ride alot of my friends and they all ride all mountain full suspension. Im on a 90mm hardtail.
    Since we have so many suspension lengths available, it only makes sense that we would choose the type of bike most suited to our riding style. You may ride a 90mm HT on "AM" terrain, but you're the exception to the rule. Just as an XC racer on a 140mm FS would be. I didn't think suspension was that difficult to understand?
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

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    the terrain the bike is used on determines the tires you run, not the type of bike. an xc track may very well suit a nobby nic whereas a trail considered all mountain may suit a cross mark. it all depends on the soil/ rock/ sand/ whatever. by your logic a rigid should be running slicks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZXFT View Post
    Travel has to do with it because a 100mm fork is XC material.
    Tell that to this guy...


    Nobby Nic is pushing it for XC. To me, thats more of a "trail" tire. RaRa's and RoRo's are schwalbe's XC material (and furious fred of course) while renegades and fast traks are spesh's XC rubber.
    Just because you have an XC bike doesn't mean you need low tread rubber. Case study: Some people find themselves riding XC trails that contain mud. Race tires don't work that well in mud. Hence, they may run a larger tire on a short travel bike.
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    by your logic a rigid should be running slicks.
    And most are. See: every road bike made.

    I know that you pick tires based on conditions, BUT the majority (not all) of XC riders do not need that beefy of rubber on their bikes, and the majority of XC riders use 100mm forks. Therefore, the OP doesn't need that beefy of rubber or rims.
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    My statements on this thread are not end all be alls. They are generalizations. You will be able to find exceptions to these rules, but they are exceptions.

    Example:
    Generalization: I before E except after C
    Exception: Weird
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZXFT View Post
    Therefore, the OP doesn't need that beefy of rubber or rims.
    Quote Originally Posted by ZXFT
    My statements on this thread are not end all be alls. They are generalizations. You will be able to find exceptions to these rules, but they are exceptions.
    What if the OP is an exception?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    What if the OP is an exception?
    There is a chance, but it is small. Even smaller considering he has been using aspens and hasn't detected a problem.
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

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    Keep the aspen in the rear, if it is not too wet it is a great tire. The front can use something more grippy.

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    ZXFT,
    Are you for real, you actually question the use of this guys tires and travel of his fork. Everyone has a different preference in tires and his fork length of a 100mm doesn't necessarily mean he's a XC rider. I know riders on full ridged bikes that can out ride most DH'ers or so called All Mountain riders. The issue here is he bent a rim and walked out. My suggestion to the OP is next time this happens pull the wheel off the bike, lay it flat on the ground and push down and bend it back as straight as you can. Most times you can get it back straight enough to ride out and limp it back. It sure beats hike-A-biking it out.

    As far as replacing the rim, the rule is if it has a kink it's toast. If there is no kink a good wheel builder can relace it and it should be fine. Good luck and and glad you didn't get hurt.
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    Can't go wrong with Mavic Crossmax wheels. I am the same height but about 60 lbs lighter than you. I am currently running Hope hubs laced to Stans Crest rims. For you I think the Arch might be a better choice as the Crests are a pretty light welght rim.
    Last edited by Frozenspokes; 12-24-2012 at 08:18 PM.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

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    OH MY GOD. All I was saying is chances are he rides XC. I am in no way positive of this statement nor am I positive that he shouldn't be running Dirty Dan's. I am just saying that most likely he rides tame XC trails based on his current set-up and therefore I recommend a fast rolling, lightweight tire with slightly more grip than an aspen.
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    Worst case scenario:

    If on the trail: Just hit the rim with a big branch or rock. If you have a shovel laying around, that'll work great.

    At home: just replace the rim.

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    At a ride last year a friend did almost the same thing to his wheel .So him and another friend took the wheel off the bike and slammed it down on the pavement ,it was almost straight after that . I think there is a video on you tube of them doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Atcher View Post
    I did have a short thought about banging it against a nearby tree, but knowing my luck I would just snap the rim in half or catch the tree on fire or something. The rear wheel is also a hair bent, but easily ride able. I just got them trued last weekend too...

    Im not tight on money whatsoever, so any suggestions on new rims and tire combos are welcome.
    I am wondering about the truing you had done.... Some of the spokes may have been a bit too tight and a small lateral force can the rim to bend to the tight ones. I do not like mine too tight as I did that once a long time ago.... I set them to ring like bells till a side force bent the rim! They need a little freedom! JMHO!

    poikaa
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    Flashbacks. Just accomplished this myself a month ago. Come off a drop and front wheel landed in a quick sand pit of forest duff and sank almost to the axle. Low and behold there was a rock also buried just ahead of the landing which caught the wheel and proceeded to rotate it 90 degrees while still buried. This provided the perfect anchor to stick my wheel and toss me right otb. Luckily that soft forest duff broke my fall so I walked away un-scathed. The wheel on the other hand looked like it got hit by a car. Luckily there were 2 strategically placed pines (the forest gods with a sense of humor) right there that served as the perfect fulcrum cause I wasnít about to hike the ~5miles back to the truck with wrecked bike in tow. Straightened up, limped out, on to fight another day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZXFT View Post
    You fell because you're running an aspen in the front and you're +200 lbs. One of my sub-150 lbs friends ran an aspen in the rear and he said it slid all over the place. Try a Cross-mark, racing ralph, or fast trak.

    As for wheels: Stan's Arch EX rims with King/hope hubs and some sapim or dt to hold it all together.
    6'4", 185 and did this to an Arch EX 15mm thru....on an Aspen :-). Clipped a tree, dug it in, and went for a flight. No banging or wedging between trees was going to get it straight. Was going to be my last ride on the Aspen.....and it was! My crash wasn't the Aspen's fault, but it is by far the loosest tire I have ever ridden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    Well theres your problem right there. Your running an Aspen on the front. How big a boy are you to thrash a front rim like that? Also, what rim you running? Are you telling the entire story?

    Thankfully the rider was OK. I generally check the bike first after going down as well. Keep the rubber side down.
    Could you elaborate on what exactly you mean here? I am realatively new and this is the first I have heard about a tire causing something like this.

    I am about to get some new tires for my bike (ride moslty XC type with a little "trail type" of stuff mixed in but honestly am still not sure what kind of riding is what), and want to make sure I avoid anything that could possibly contribute to somehting like this. I am also pretty heave at 200-210 although I plan on getting down to the 185 range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atl-Biker View Post
    Could you elaborate on what exactly you mean here? I am realatively new and this is the first I have heard about a tire causing ...
    I think he is saying that the Aspen is a poor choice for a front tire because it does not have sufficient lugs for cornering. I'd have chosen a meatier tire for the front.

  31. #31
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    I don't see how a washout could cause a wheel to taco like that, unless there was something seriously wrong with the way it was built. Here's what is much more likely to cause this - Tom's Taco at Fountain Head - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobretti View Post
    I don't see how a washout could cause a wheel to taco like that, unless there was something seriously wrong with the way it was built. Here's what is much more likely to cause this - Tom's Taco at Fountain Head - YouTube

    From the looks of it that was a pretty clean landing and I think a solidly built wheel would have survived it no problem. Actually a washout can potentially stress them a lot more than that jump, though I agree that a poorly built wheel is usually the culprit.

    Once I was doing a nice controlled slide on snow covered ice and hit a small dry patch that completely potato chipped my rear wheel. It was brand new factory built POS wheel.

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    And I don't mean cheap, just shoddily built.

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    So I have decided on my wheels and everything. Stans Arch EX with Geax AKA front and back. And just for fun Im going to run tubeless to see how that goes. Worst case on that is i wasted money on having that done.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    From the looks of it that was a pretty clean landing and I think a solidly built wheel would have survived it no problem. Actually a washout can potentially stress them a lot more than that jump, though I agree that a poorly built wheel is usually the culprit.

    Once I was doing a nice controlled slide on snow covered ice and hit a small dry patch that completely potato chipped my rear wheel. It was brand new factory built POS wheel.
    The rider in that weighs over #200, so that contributed some also I believe.
    I've had good luck with my last 2 sets of factory wheels. They barely even went out of true, despite harsh treatment, at least with the rear. The 1 custom set I had built hasn't been as good, the rear has gone out of whack a couple times, and I've gone easier on it. I guess wheels are one of those that things vary considerably with regards to durabilty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Once I was doing a nice controlled slide on snow covered ice and hit a small dry patch that completely potato chipped my rear wheel. It was brand new factory built POS wheel.

    Forgot to mention that I re-bent, tensioned and trued that wheel and rode it on my daily commuter for about 6 years with no (big) problems after that incident, which I thought was pretty cool!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Atcher View Post
    So I have decided on my wheels and everything. Stans Arch EX with Geax AKA front and back. And just for fun Im going to run tubeless to see how that goes. Worst case on that is i wasted money on having that done.
    Tubeless is the best thing ever, and Stan's rims go perfectly with it. AKAs look solid, although I've never ridden one personally.
    Something wrong with your bike? Blame it on super human strength and sleep well at night knowing you are more than a man.

  38. #38
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    tnt or standard. ive heard tnt and stans dont play nicely together.

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    It's the tnt. Why don't they play nicely? I thought they were designed for tubeless? Or just the certain rim they don't like?

    I was thinking about it and I may have been fine on my aspens if I reversed the tread on them. Sacrifice some rolling resistance for a hair bit of grip. Who needs low rolling resistance anyway... Oh well. Too late for that now. Upgrades away.
    Slightly faster than a speeding snail.

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    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Atcher View Post
    It's the tnt. Why don't they play nicely? I thought they were designed for tubeless? Or just the certain rim they don't like?
    the tnt bead is next to impossible to get on stans rims i have head.

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    Hey OP, you ever look I to why your weight fluctuated through ten pounds/day? I'm 5'9 and do the exact same but its between 205-215. I swear one day I'm 205 and the next I'm 212 then down to 210 its so weird. I check multiple times and it reads the same.
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  43. #43
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    It's really not that bad. It's just I don't check my weight much. But sometimes it does feel that way. Maybe if I actually ate something healthy every now and then it would stay...

    My bike shop is putting everything together. They even suggested the combo so I guess they haven't had too much trouble with them. I'll ask them if they've ever had any trouble with them when I go pick up my bike.
    Slightly faster than a speeding snail.

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