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  1. #1
    I like dual suspension.
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    So I soaked my entire bike in Finishline Super Bike Wash.

    Yes, even the bearings. Wether it's fact or fiction that spraying Finish Line Super Bike Wash in your bearings or hubs is totally bad news, I think a large percentage of it is just all talk. So, I took my spare hardtail Trek 3900 and washed the entire bike in the stuff. Frame, drivetrain, BEARINGS, hubs... You name it, it got soaked. Then I rinsed it all off with water...

    The bicycle looks great! Super clean and it smells good too.

    Although there were no immediate effects on any parts of the bike, I'm thinking if anything is going to happen then it will happen within a couple or a few days from now.

    Personally, I think the whole "Don't spray your bearings with Bike Wash!!!!!!!!!!!" thing is a myth. Just a little test I was doing just so I'd know from actual experience.

    Last edited by Bavarian3900; 03-18-2007 at 05:06 PM.

  2. #2
    SLX
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    Wait? isnt bike wash made for bikes?

  3. #3
    I like dual suspension.
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    Yes, but a ton of people are afraid to use it anywhere on the bicycle but the frame because it is said that it can act as a degreaser and strip the lube from bearings and such. I think that's false.

  4. #4
    zen
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    well I guess you'll find out soon enough! :>

    I think the concern comes with using a high pressure wash and injecting water into the bearings.

  5. #5
    ~I Ride In Circles ~
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    If you actually soaked the bearings the lube will be compromised.. but if you just covered the outside of the whole bike what could be hurt? you'll prolly need to lube the deraileur pivots and such and things like that but you should be fine.
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  6. #6
    Vaginatarian
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    well the instructions "safe for all bike surfaces" I wouldnt actually soak any bike parts in it, but I use it all the time . seems to remove aftermarket stickers though

  7. #7
    Trying a little
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    your bike will be a pile of metal shavings by morning.

    I never apologize. I'm sorry, but that's just the way I am.

  8. #8
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    I've had success using a mixture of Simple Green and water in clean up after a mud-soaking ride, but then again I typically use caution not to soak the bearings/ headset etc.
    To clean those areas it's usually back to damp rag or an old toothbrush.

    Do share the end results of your experiment though.
    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  9. #9
    I like dual suspension.
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    I had completely drenched the entire bottom bracket, the derailure, the brakes, the hubs. Like I said, you name it, It got the "Super Bike Wash". No where on the bottle does it warn the customer of the "complications" spraying your bearings can cause, so I want to prove, to myself mostly, that it is completely safe to do what I did about 8 hours ago.

    SlimTwisted, I'll be sure to post any results tomorrow and for a couple of more days after that.

    *edit*

    And I'll continue to clean my entire bicycle with this stuff untill something does go wrong.

  10. #10
    dirty trail dog
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bavarian3900

    *edit*

    And I'll continue to clean my entire bicycle with this stuff untill something does go wrong.
    I like your style.

    I've used the stuff on my hardtail for a while in much the same way you are. No problems, yet. And it does indeed smell good, which is a bonus.

    [edit] I should read closer - I *don't* soak my BB or any part with bearings in this stuff. I do use it on nearly everything else.
    Last edited by Rebus; 03-19-2007 at 07:31 AM.
    yep...

  11. #11
    Its got what plants crave
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    I like to repack all of my bearings with mud. I'll continue doing it until something goes wrong.

  12. #12
    ~I Ride In Circles ~
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    I've washed my bike the same way for 2 years.. Bucket of hot water and a couple paint brushes. Usually the whole bikes clean in one bucket of water. If it's really bad a second quick rinse. Seems to me like the cheapest/safest way to clean a bike.
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  13. #13
    ...idios...
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    You can save yourself the potential risk of damaging your bearings and/or hubs by getting a bunch of bearings, coating them in whichever grease you use in your hubs then dropping them into a jar with some of your chosen cleaner. Stir the bearings around in the jar to (very poorly) simulate the action of a rotating hub and you'll see exactly how the cleaner will affect the grease.
    This is the effect that Finish Line Super Bike Wash had on the Pedro's Syn (very thick, high quality grease) I coated these bearings in;

    grease vs cleaner.jpg

    The bottom left picture shows the bearings as I poured them from the jar. I did not wipe them at all, but note how clean they are after only 20 or 30 seconds of stirring. This picture shows what it's all like when the cleaner has had a bit longer to work on the grease, note the further breakdown of the grease;

    grease vs cleaner2.jpg

    It's not a particularly good experiment, although it has the benefit of not being as foolish as trying it out on your actual bike, and it's highly unlikely that you will ever get that much neat cleaner/degreaser into your bearings, at least not in a single washdown. Unless, of course, you're trying to prove a point.

    "I'll be sure to post any results tomorrow and for a couple of more days after that."

    I could be wrong, but I doubt you'll be able to see any effects, unless you're doing a few hundred miles. I would be interested to know how everything holds up with if you continue with your method for the next six months or so. It may or may not take a while to wash away the grease that contributes to the effectiveness of the component's seals, depending on the quality of the components, but once the seals have been compromsed the deterioration of the internal grease will accelerate.
    Are you financially well-off, Bavarian3900?
    Last edited by SteveUK; 03-19-2007 at 07:26 AM.
    .
    .


    What luck for rulers, that men do not think - Adolf Hitler

  14. #14
    Dented n' Spent
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK

    "I'll be sure to post any results tomorrow and for a couple of more days after that."

    I could be wrong, but I doubt you'll be able to see any effects, unless you're doing a few hundred miles. I would be interested to know how everything holds up with if you continue with your method for the next six months or so.
    I was thinking the same thing exactly. I'd bet you could wash 80% of the lube out of your bearings and it would still take considerable time to see an actual failure. Unless you're actually making a point out of trying to blow the stuff past your dust seals and flush out the bearings, I think 6 mos would be the very soonest you'll see effects.

    Ah, the sound of crunching bearings - like grape nuts for the bike.
    What kind of bike?​ I don'​t know,​ I'm not a bike scien​tist.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    You can save yourself the potential risk of damaging your bearings and/or hubs by getting a bunch of bearings, coating them in whichever grease you use in your hubs then dropping them into a jar with some of your chosen cleaner. Stir the bearings around in the jar to (very poorly) simulate the action of a rotating hub and you'll see exactly how the cleaner will affect the grease.
    This is the effect that Finish Line Super Bike Wash had on the Pedro's Syn (very thick, high quality grease) I coated these bearings in;

    grease vs cleaner.jpg

    The bottom left picture shows the bearings as I poured them from the jar. I did not wipe them at all, but note how clean they are after only 20 or 30 seconds of stirring. This picture shows what it's all like when the cleaner has had a bit longer to work on the grease, note the further breakdown of the grease;

    grease vs cleaner2.jpg

    It's not a particularly good experiment, although it has the benefit of not being as foolish as trying it out on your actual bike, and it's highly unlikely that you will ever get that much neat cleaner/degreaser into your bearings, at least not in a single washdown. Unless, of course, you're trying to prove a point.

    "I'll be sure to post any results tomorrow and for a couple of more days after that."

    I could be wrong, but I doubt you'll be able to see any effects, unless you're doing a few hundred miles. I would be interested to know how everything holds up with if you continue with your method for the next six months or so. It may or may not take a while to wash away the grease that contributes to the effectiveness of the component's seals, depending on the quality of the components, but once the seals have been compromsed the deterioration of the internal grease will accelerate.
    Are you financially well-off, Bavarian3900?
    I use soap and water, but I also spend a lot of time regreasing stuff.

    OT what happened to that wied brake rotor issue?

  16. #16
    Glad to Be Alive
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    Quote Originally Posted by dusthuffer
    your bike will be a pile of metal shavings by morning.
    and rust
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  17. #17
    ...idios...
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    "OT what happened to that wied brake rotor issue?"

    I removed the 20mm adaptor and reverted to a 165mm rotor on the rear. I've stuck a Mono M4 on the front and seem to have found a 203mm/F and 165mm/R to be the sweet set-up for my riding style. The M4 is outstanding.

  18. #18
    Ride Instigator
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    GREAT idea!....

    Next time I change the oil in my truck I'm just going to fill up the crankcase with sudsey water...and I'll continue doing so until something goes wrong .

    We don't need no steenking lubricant, it's just an engineering myth .

  19. #19
    I <3 29ers
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricko
    Next time I change the oil in my truck I'm just going to fill up the crankcase with sudsey water...and I'll continue doing so until something goes wrong .

    We don't need no steenking lubricant, it's just an engineering myth .
    Uhhh, yeah, maybe that's not really the same thing, huh?

    I ..... need ..... DIRT!!!!!

    ... and cookies.

  20. #20
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    SteveUK That looks like a nasty shotgun blast clean-up effort!

  21. #21
    Front Range, Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    You can save yourself the potential risk of damaging your bearings and/or hubs by getting a bunch of bearings, coating them in whichever grease you use in your hubs then dropping them into a jar with some of your chosen cleaner. Stir the bearings around in the jar to (very poorly) simulate the action of a rotating hub and you'll see exactly how the cleaner will affect the grease.
    This is the effect that Finish Line Super Bike Wash had on the Pedro's Syn (very thick, high quality grease) I coated these bearings in;

    grease vs cleaner.jpg

    The bottom left picture shows the bearings as I poured them from the jar. I did not wipe them at all, but note how clean they are after only 20 or 30 seconds of stirring. This picture shows what it's all like when the cleaner has had a bit longer to work on the grease, note the further breakdown of the grease;

    grease vs cleaner2.jpg

    It's not a particularly good experiment, although it has the benefit of not being as foolish as trying it out on your actual bike, and it's highly unlikely that you will ever get that much neat cleaner/degreaser into your bearings, at least not in a single washdown. Unless, of course, you're trying to prove a point.

    "I'll be sure to post any results tomorrow and for a couple of more days after that."

    I could be wrong, but I doubt you'll be able to see any effects, unless you're doing a few hundred miles. I would be interested to know how everything holds up with if you continue with your method for the next six months or so. It may or may not take a while to wash away the grease that contributes to the effectiveness of the component's seals, depending on the quality of the components, but once the seals have been compromsed the deterioration of the internal grease will accelerate.
    Are you financially well-off, Bavarian3900?
    You have wayyyyy too much time on your hands. But I like it. Good job!

  22. #22
    ballbuster
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    Sure...

    Whatever floats your boat.

    The real issue, if somebody here hasn;t told you yet, is that you run the danger of sqirting dirt past the seals of your bearings, and making them all crunchy, if not fused.

    I know from personal experience. I've ruined two Shimano XT bottom brackets with 'gentile hose pressure' by not being gentile enough. Luckily, Shimano XT bottom brackets (the '03 octalink ones) aren't too expensive.

    Maybe you don't get the same kind of sandy dirt we do here in Northern California. I know a lot of the flat parts of Germany are pretty sandy. I dunno about Bavaria.

    I usually wash my bike in car Zip Wash. The local auto parts store sells it for like $3 a bottle, which lasts me years using it on the bike and the car. I use a bucket, the light sprinkly hose attachment and a lambswool mitt around the frame and rims.

    Then again, I hardly wash my bikes anymore.... come to think of it, I don;t ride them much either. At least, not enough!
    Last edited by pimpbot; 03-19-2007 at 04:49 PM.

  23. #23
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricko

    We don't need no steenking lubricant, it's just an engineering myth .
    Perpetuated by the lubrication industry, no doubt.

  24. #24
    I like dual suspension.
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    It's been two days and everything seems fine. If you guy's want 6 months of testing, then I'll do it. I still think the bicycle is going to be completely fine, regardless of the little jar test that was shown above.

    I'll keep you posted!

    P.S.

    I think it's hilarious that everyone is botherd so much by my "I'll continue to do so untill something goes wrong" statement! Hahaha! What do you guy's care?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bavarian3900
    It's been two days and everything seems fine. If you guy's want 6 months of testing, then I'll do it. I still think the bicycle is going to be completely fine, regardless of the little jar test that was shown above.

    I'll keep you posted!

    P.S.

    I think it's hilarious that everyone is botherd so much by my "I'll continue to do so untill something goes wrong" statement! Hahaha! What do you guy's care?
    They are trying to keep you from making a silly, and potentially expensive, mistake.

    Finish Line assumes their customers are smart enough to know not to direct any cleaner or solvent directly at bearings they are not intending to clean and repack immediately.
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