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  1. #1
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    Seatpost marker?

    Is there a good way to mark a seatpost so you know where to reset after removing it from a work stand?

  2. #2
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    Put a scratch on it
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
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    I use tape
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

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  4. #4
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    I use a black marker. It's easily visible on the black post.

  5. #5
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    Dremel








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  6. #6
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    Some simple electrical tape will work just fine. A lot of pro teams do the same thing, so that's how you know it's legit.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Is there a good way to mark a seatpost so you know where to reset after removing it from a work stand?
    I used to work on a lot of high end road bikes. General rule of thumb: don't mess with seatpost adjusment.

    If its your own bike go right ahead, but if you're working on another's they might get finnicky if they see you changing seat height. It sucks to be on a 200 mile road ride and feel distracted that your post might not be exactly where you want it.

    Of course most mtbers are less concerned since post height is often a compromise involving more than just putting the power down. I've wondered about an alternative to scratching your post when you want to drop it for a climb and bring it back to the right height afterwards. Tape won't make it in and out of the seattube.

  8. #8
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    My seat post has numbers on the back. I can't be the only one.

  9. #9
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    Put a piece of tape on the post and remove it. Use a spare post to secure in the stand.

  10. #10
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    Temporary? A bit of masking tape. On my own bike, I've made a line on the tube with a silver Sharpie since I usually drop the post an inch for technical trails. It lets me consistently reset seat height after the ride.

  11. #11
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    I leave all seats at one height, just need to raise the post when putting them in the work stand to wash the bike, lube the chain etc.

  12. #12
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    I put a small scratch on mine with the edge of a file (Thomson). All the carbon posts I have have number markers.

  13. #13
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    Markings or some sort of decal would be good!

  14. #14
    Carbon or Commie?
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    I use a scribe to etch a line.

  15. #15
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    If I put my pinky on the collar used to tighten the seat and stretch my fingers apart certain amount, the distance between my pinky tip and thumb tip is dang close to where I like it. That's how I used to do it. Now that I have a dropper, I'm a little out of practice.

  16. #16
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    Tighten a zip-tie around a saddle rail, cut off the end where it touches the top of the seat tube when the saddle's at the desired height. Tuck the zip-tie up under the saddle when not in use.

  17. #17
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    I could cut a small piece of a wood dowel or tubing to use as a template when removing the bike from the work stand by nothing would be faster than a visual!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I could cut a small piece of a wood dowel or tubing to use as a template when removing the bike from the work stand by nothing would be faster than a visual!
    You might as well use a tape measure, and fwiw a marker won't work with the grease that should be on the post involved.
    Round and round we go

  19. #19
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    How about a hacksaw???

  20. #20
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    Wow, very clever though, a pre-attached template!!!

  21. #21
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    Temporary? A bit of masking tape. On my own bike, I've made a line on the tube with a silver Sharpie since I usually drop the post an inch for technical trails. It lets me consistently reset seat height after the ride.
    ^ Mark with a silver sharpie
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  22. #22
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    I think that is less destructive than marking with a hacksaw, or drilling a hole, not that I seriously considered either scenario!

  23. #23
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by axisofoil View Post
    I use a scribe to etch a line.
    This. Simple and permanent.


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    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Put a scratch on it
    No, NO, no,, stress risers, specially dangerous on the front of the post (under tension, back under compression)

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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    No, NO, no,, stress risers, specially dangerous on the front of the post (under tension, back under compression)
    Hogwash.

    If a seat tube can't withstand a surface scratch, it has no business being a seat tube in the first place.

    Are you really going to tell us that a seat tube can't be scratched? That you should replace a seat tube if you crash and scrape it against a rock? Does this same logic apply to all components? Like for example, fork legs?




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  26. #26
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    Hogwash.

    If a seat tube can't withstand a surface scratch, it has no business being a seat tube in the first place.

    Are you really going to tell us that a seat tube can't be scratched? That you should replace a seat tube if you crash and scrape it against a rock? Does this same logic apply to all components? Like for example, fork legs?




    Sent from my rotary phone and compiled with a telegraph machine.
    Replace "tube" with post, please.


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  27. #27
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    IM not saying use a chainsaw. The post gets scratched from simply installing it. Using an etch to scribe a line is also putting a scratch on it.
    Round and round we go

  28. #28
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    i just use a sharpie. It will wear off eventually. Just re-sharpie it after it wears off.
    I also mark my handlebars and stem(on bottom where no one can see) w/a sharpie line. Makes reassembling bikes from travel bags easier/faster.
    2012 Pivot Mach 429
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty $anchez View Post
    Put a piece of tape on the post and remove it. Use a spare post to secure in the stand.

    Back in the day, when most seat posts were stout enough to hammer nails with, a scratch with an awl was the ticket but now a lot of posts (straight/non-dropper) cost more than my first mountain bike. The Dirty $anchez method mentioned above is the best.

  30. #30
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Back in the day, when most seat posts were stout enough to hammer nails with, a scratch with an awl was the ticket but now a lot of posts (straight/non-dropper) cost more than my first mountain bike. The Dirty $anchez method mentioned above is the best.
    Must be turning in to a retro grouch. I've been riding the same seat posts for around a decade. They don't seem to be negatively impacted by the awl mark.

    Really, if a seat post can't withstand a scratch, should they be on a bike at all?


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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    Must be turning in to a retro grouch. I've been riding the same seat posts for around a decade. They don't seem to be negatively impacted by the awl mark.

    Really, if a seat post can't withstand a scratch, should they be on a bike at all?


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    not everybody has alloy posts
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  32. #32
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    IMO, of all the various suggestions and there are many good ones, I like marking the seat post with a white or silver sharpie!

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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by ElDuderino2412 View Post
    not everybody has alloy posts
    Great point.


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  34. #34
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    I run about 9" of seatpost extension. It coincidentally works out well - I typically pull out my trouser snake, place it next to the post and set my saddle height accordingly.

    Not everyone is so lucky.
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    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

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    I wish I had a dropper post because a lot of my rides are on varied terrain. I'm not scared to adjust manually so I have three marks scribed on my post. The tallest line for smooth sailing, then one about a half inch lower and another an inch below that one. I'm usually wanting something pretty close to one of those lines, and I know exactly what each of them feel like, so changing the height is fast.

    I use the tip of a razor blade to scribe lines in my post. The teeniest tiniest thinnest line shows up forever, I hardly apply any pressure at all to the blade. Can't imagine that it would do any damage or lead to cracks, it's just an alloy post.

  36. #36
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    Permanent scratches affect resale of the post and future reference if you change saddles or shoes or pedals.

    I use a sharpee or tape but that Zip Tie idea is pretty cool too.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  37. #37
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    Ever try a tape measure? They're amazing.

  38. #38
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    you could always put the tape on before you remove the seat post, that way the bottom line of the tape is where it should be set, drop the seat back in, when it reaches the bottom of the tape, your golden

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Ever try a tape measure? They're amazing.
    That's only a good idea if I bring it up. lol, Plus tape measures can scratch. Best to use tailor's tape. Don't use a cheap one they can stretch and degrade over time. Yup, it's true

    You could secure the bike with the top or down tube ahda, and leave the serious business of moving the seatpost to qualified pit crew mechanics.
    Round and round we go

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by senorjax View Post
    I wish I had a dropper post because a lot of my rides are on varied terrain. I'm not scared to adjust manually so I have three marks scribed on my post. The tallest line for smooth sailing, then one about a half inch lower and another an inch below that one. I'm usually wanting something pretty close to one of those lines, and I know exactly what each of them feel like, so changing the height is fast.

    I use the tip of a razor blade to scribe lines in my post. The teeniest tiniest thinnest line shows up forever, I hardly apply any pressure at all to the blade. Can't imagine that it would do any damage or lead to cracks, it's just an alloy post.
    another, slightly heavier(and not without its own problems) approach is to use some cable crimper-do-hickies and set a derailleur cable going from your seat rails to your seattube clamp bolt. If you set it so the post is at the right height when you pull the cable taught, you can quickly return the post to its max height at the end of a descent for which you lowered the seat. a bit of security if you lock and leave your bike too. It also works well if you're 6 hrs in and its night and you can't reliably figure out where your mark is.

  41. #41
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    call me old fashioned, but i just use the marks that occur naturally when a seatpost is actually installed. or i use the grease marks...

    regardless, it's not brain surgery. there is always an obvious mark of some sort that differentiates from the inserted and extended part of the seatpost...


  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    there is sometimes an obvious mark of some sort that differentiates from the inserted and extended part of the seatpost...
    this is more like my reality. especially when you've had a post for more than one frame or you've changed pedals, shoes, saddles, etc and now your old mark is no longer the correct one.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    ...now your old mark is no longer the correct one.
    which is why you use the new one. pull your post out right now, there is an obvious insertion mark. be it from the clamp, grease or whatever, but snap a picture of it and i bet everyone on this forum can tell you where that point is...


  44. #44
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    I use a silver marker, you can get it at any office supply store. Works great!

  45. #45
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    So I guess you have a quick release seat post clamp?

  46. #46
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    I don't understand..... why can't you just sit on it, and see whats comfy?

  47. #47
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    I've always used a spring loaded center punch ( like the one to break tempered glass windows in an emergency) and put a single punch mark on an aluminum post right at the top of the seat tube and centered in the slot of the clamp/seat tube. This gives quick reference to seat height and centering. My carbon post all have scaled decals on them.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Is there a good way to mark a seatpost so you know where to reset after removing it from a work stand?
    Normally there have a mark come with the seatpost at the backside...

  49. #49
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by DMKiefer View Post
    I've always used a spring loaded center punch ( like the one to break tempered glass windows in an emergency) and put a single punch mark on an aluminum post right at the top of the seat tube and centered in the slot of the clamp/seat tube. This gives quick reference to seat height and centering. My carbon post all have scaled decals on them.
    This is a great idea. Thanks.


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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by random walk View Post
    Tighten a zip-tie around a saddle rail, cut off the end where it touches the top of the seat tube when the saddle's at the desired height. Tuck the zip-tie up under the saddle when not in use.
    Great idea!

  51. #51
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    Very clever!....You see, you ask, you get many answers that are similar and then one that no one else had thought of!

  52. #52
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    It's amazing how hard people will work to avoid just using a Sharpie to mark the thing
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  53. #53
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    I ordered a white sharpie, I think that is the simplest and it gives several options as well.

    I just hope it lasts!

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    which is why you use the new one. pull your post out right now, there is an obvious insertion mark. be it from the clamp, grease or whatever, but snap a picture of it and i bet everyone on this forum can tell you where that point is...
    this might be true if you raise the seatpost and don't have it clamped very long. Working at a shop, it's courteous to wipe grease off a post before you clamp it so the next person to use the stand doesn't get gooped, which often erases the mark. Even wrapping the post in a rag and trying not to wipe the mark off is likely to blur the mark or erase it, especially if you're doing something high torque like pulling bb cups, which is likely to lead you to twist the frame in the stand, obscuring the grease mark. Using a spare post is one option, but that doesn't work for everyone and you'd need a spare post for every size seatpost that you clamp in your stand.

    However, I was referring more to the issue of lowering the post for descents and knowing how high to raise it to. sliding the post down into the frame blurs the grease mark, doing this many times over the course of a few years leads to many blurred marks. To some extent this can be combated by cleaning the post, but some of the marks that will remain are from dirt grinding off enough finish to create a mark that is indelible.

    and responding to the idea of denting the post, the idea of denting my thomson post is unappealing because I might change my seatpost insertion with a different saddle, pedals, shoes, or as fitness, flexibility, preferences, etc. change over time. Not to mention the fact that I expect to use the thomson post for longer than I'll want to keep the frame.

    And to the poster who asked why we don't just ride what feels right: This is ultimately what happens, but stopping and experimenting with different positions is not what I want to do on every ride. Even if it feels right, it might feel better in a different position. If I'm on a 40 mile ride in the mountains with several 5+ mile climbs, I really really don't want to have any doubts about the optimality of my post height: it's like a placebo, I don't really know if my post height is optimal, but it's vital that I think it is so I don't go crazy when every muscle in my legs are cramping as I approach the top of a 7 mile climb at the end of the day.

    Tape measures leave room for error as does putting a piece of electric tape around the post. Did I measure to saddle rails, to top of saddle, etc? tape measures are inconvenient for raising your seatpost to it's full height after a descent. Tape measures are great for adapting a seat height to a new frame, but you expect to make minor changes to post height in the first few rides. If you're working on a cranky pro racer's $10k crabon bike and you raise their seatpost and assure them you've measured where it was so you can return it to precisely where they had it....good luck convincing that cranky pro that you've left no room for error. It's worse for roadies, but I never move the post if I can figure a way not to. Even with tape, one might leave the frame in the stand for a day or two and when you come back you can't remember if the tape was flush with the top of the frame or the top of the seatpost collar. It's only a ~1-2mm difference, but some customers find that meaningful. I am not that picky, but I found understanding when I had my own devilish mental experiences with cat 1,2,3 etc. climbs.

  55. #55
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    For something somewhat permanent without scratching, silver sharpie on black. But use masking tape for nice professional looking markings. Nice narrow ring, looks factory made if done properly. I could never force myself to scratch a Thomson

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjedoaks View Post
    For something somewhat permanent without scratching, silver sharpie on black. But use masking tape for nice professional looking markings. Nice narrow ring, looks factory made if done properly. I could never force myself to scratch a Thomson
    So I guess you advise masking and then just sharpie in between the tape to get a nice straight line?

  57. #57
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    Yes, if you just mark the back half of the post and do it neatly, you'll be surprised how clean it looks

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