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  1. #1
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    Seatpost marker?

    Is there a good way to mark a seatpost so you know where to reset after removing it from a work stand?

  2. #2
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    Put a scratch on it
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
    What could go wrong ...
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    I use tape
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  4. #4
    Afric Pepperbird
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    I use a black marker. It's easily visible on the black post.

  5. #5
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    Dremel








    (marker)
    Time wounds all heels...

  6. #6
    Bro
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    Some simple electrical tape will work just fine. A lot of pro teams do the same thing, so that's how you know it's legit.
    I've made some bad decisions like taking the gears off my bike. So here's the warning: Do not as I say, nor as I do.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Is there a good way to mark a seatpost so you know where to reset after removing it from a work stand?
    I used to work on a lot of high end road bikes. General rule of thumb: don't mess with seatpost adjusment.

    If its your own bike go right ahead, but if you're working on another's they might get finnicky if they see you changing seat height. It sucks to be on a 200 mile road ride and feel distracted that your post might not be exactly where you want it.

    Of course most mtbers are less concerned since post height is often a compromise involving more than just putting the power down. I've wondered about an alternative to scratching your post when you want to drop it for a climb and bring it back to the right height afterwards. Tape won't make it in and out of the seattube.

  8. #8
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    My seat post has numbers on the back. I can't be the only one.

  9. #9
    AZ
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    Put a piece of tape on the post and remove it. Use a spare post to secure in the stand.

  10. #10
    Trailhead Poseur
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    Temporary? A bit of masking tape. On my own bike, I've made a line on the tube with a silver Sharpie since I usually drop the post an inch for technical trails. It lets me consistently reset seat height after the ride.

  11. #11
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    I leave all seats at one height, just need to raise the post when putting them in the work stand to wash the bike, lube the chain etc.

  12. #12
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    I put a small scratch on mine with the edge of a file (Thomson). All the carbon posts I have have number markers.

  13. #13
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    Markings or some sort of decal would be good!

  14. #14
    Carbon or Commie?
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    I use a scribe to etch a line.

  15. #15
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    If I put my pinky on the collar used to tighten the seat and stretch my fingers apart certain amount, the distance between my pinky tip and thumb tip is dang close to where I like it. That's how I used to do it. Now that I have a dropper, I'm a little out of practice.

  16. #16
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    Tighten a zip-tie around a saddle rail, cut off the end where it touches the top of the seat tube when the saddle's at the desired height. Tuck the zip-tie up under the saddle when not in use.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    Ty Webb

  17. #17
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    I could cut a small piece of a wood dowel or tubing to use as a template when removing the bike from the work stand by nothing would be faster than a visual!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I could cut a small piece of a wood dowel or tubing to use as a template when removing the bike from the work stand by nothing would be faster than a visual!
    You might as well use a tape measure, and fwiw a marker won't work with the grease that should be on the post involved.
    Round and round we go

  19. #19
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    How about a hacksaw???

  20. #20
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    Wow, very clever though, a pre-attached template!!!

  21. #21
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    Temporary? A bit of masking tape. On my own bike, I've made a line on the tube with a silver Sharpie since I usually drop the post an inch for technical trails. It lets me consistently reset seat height after the ride.
    ^ Mark with a silver sharpie
    We do not stop playing because we grow old;
    We grow old because we stop playing

  22. #22
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    I think that is less destructive than marking with a hacksaw, or drilling a hole, not that I seriously considered either scenario!

  23. #23
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by axisofoil View Post
    I use a scribe to etch a line.
    This. Simple and permanent.


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    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Put a scratch on it
    No, NO, no,, stress risers, specially dangerous on the front of the post (under tension, back under compression)

  25. #25
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    Seatpost marker?

    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    No, NO, no,, stress risers, specially dangerous on the front of the post (under tension, back under compression)
    Hogwash.

    If a seat tube can't withstand a surface scratch, it has no business being a seat tube in the first place.

    Are you really going to tell us that a seat tube can't be scratched? That you should replace a seat tube if you crash and scrape it against a rock? Does this same logic apply to all components? Like for example, fork legs?




    Sent from my rotary phone and compiled with a telegraph machine.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

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