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  1. #1
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    Running as training (OTB)

    Between bikes right now and I'm running to stay in shape. First day running killed me for a couple days after but my muscles have acclimated. Have been OTB (off the bike) for two weeks straight but running 4.5 miles every other day. I'll be back on a new bike in 2 weeks but if I keep up the running, how hard will it be to get back on the bike? I'd like to hear from runners whether its a viable temporary substitute and how painful its going to be to get back on the bike.

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  2. #2
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    I found running to be useful to lose weight and maintain cardio fitness but not as useful to maintain that grunt you need when you're out of the saddle powering up climbs. I threw in pushups and 8 count body builders as well to maintain upper body and core strength.

  3. #3
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    I took a break from bike riding, started running 5 miles/day. It was good exercise but rather boring.

    We have lots of hills and running up a hill will kill you faster then biking up.

    Great sport, combines good with riding.

    My back started to hurt after a while and it is really bad for your knees, especially if you are a bit over weight.

    Don't increase your weekly mileage too much <10% is ok.. or you will experience shin splints. very painful.

    Good luck

  4. #4
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    Best I can do off the bike is hiking, I'll take my puppies out and do a 2-3 hr hike. I have tried running many times but it was killing crappy old body.

  5. #5
    duh
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    Running and biking use the muscles differently. Yes it is a good way to stay in shape but you will find you have to become accustom to biking again when you return to it. Your muscle might be a bit sore but will come back fast.

    Like SeaBass said it is good to keep the cardio up but throw in some weight training to keep the muscles active.
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  6. #6
    AZ
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    Running is for prey. That said, running is great cardio, and for losing weight. It is also hard on the joints and your likelihood of injury is disproportionately high, it also does little to improve cycling fitness. If you are going to run, work up the mileage slowly and make sure that you are in the correct shoes.
    Last edited by AZ; 12-30-2012 at 06:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    I have started running as a change up to biking. I have been running about 3-4miles at a time and it good to prevent lossof fitness, but I don't believe it has helped my biking. Different muscle groups is good to get fit and trim, but does not translate to riding power or endurance.

    Still I like it because it makes me mor fit overall and good for vacations when I can't bring the bike. This week I am off on vacation and I can't bring the bike easily. Running shoes pack well however.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  8. #8
    toscano
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    Quote Originally Posted by deke505 View Post
    Running and biking use the muscles differently. Yes it is a good way to stay in shape but you will find you have to become accustom to biking again when you return to it. Your muscle might be a bit sore but will come back fast.

    Like SeaBass said it is good to keep the cardio up but throw in some weight training to keep the muscles active.

    I agree, but as everyone has said running is a good thing to keep weight under control.
    In recent years because of my job I have no time to train, when I can have a few hours of freedom I have long hikes alternating walking and running.
    But honestly about bike, biking is the best training.

  9. #9
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    I'm a runner that has found himself biking more nowadays. Cause it's funner. Running is great for cardio and mental stamina. Boring, yes. I started running cause it was cheap and effective. All you need is a good pair of shoes.

    I have found that when I bike a lot my cardio goes down, I tend to put on a couple pounds, but my bike skills get better. I can zig and zag, climb better...etc. When I run a lot, my cardio gets better, my metabolism increases, but my knees start to hurt. The knee thing kinda just started in the past couple of months. So I hop back on my bike. It's a never ending cycle. Either way I feel like I am getting a good workout.
    I like to hug trees at FULL SPEED!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mazukea View Post
    I'm a runner that has found himself biking more nowadays. Cause it's funner. Running is great for cardio and mental stamina. Boring, yes. I started running cause it was cheap and effective. All you need is a good pair of shoes.

    I have found that when I bike a lot my cardio goes down, I tend to put on a couple pounds, but my bike skills get better. I can zig and zag, climb better...etc. When I run a lot, my cardio gets better, my metabolism increases, but my knees start to hurt. The knee thing kinda just started in the past couple of months. So I hop back on my bike. It's a never ending cycle. Either way I feel like I am getting a good workout.
    You should get an eliptical machine. It burns more and hurts less than running
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  11. #11
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    Have any of you guys tried barefoot style of running? I do mostly cardio workouts and include running a couple of times a week. Last year I read Born to Run and starting running without heel strikes. All of my running related pains went away and my speed increased. It takes some practice but it's definitely easier on the body.

    BTW - if you haven't read Born to Run, it's a great book about running history, ultra marathons and personal drama of the writer venturing to Mexico to run with the Tarahumara Indians. And of course discussing barefoot running style an heel strike running style.

  12. #12
    toscano
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    I never tried to run barefoot but I am very close to that way of thinking.
    I saw videos on youtube about Caballo Blanco, Kilian Jornet and Anton Krupicka.
    Their performances are phenomenal, but on a smaller scale anyone can and should learn something good.
    I'm not obsessed by the lightness but experience has taught me that about outdoor activities we need less and less of what, usually, we get in a backpack or a waistpack.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Have any of you guys tried barefoot style of running? I do mostly cardio workouts and include running a couple of times a week. Last year I read Born to Run and starting running without heel strikes. All of my running related pains went away and my speed increased. It takes some practice but it's definitely easier on the body.

    BTW - if you haven't read Born to Run, it's a great book about running history, ultra marathons and personal drama of the writer venturing to Mexico to run with the Tarahumara Indians. And of course discussing barefoot running style an heel strike running style.
    If you are near a beach with nice sand, you can get the same effect running with out shoes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    the big aussie rep bomb is comin your way

  14. #14
    gran jefe
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    running is great until you get an injury. go for it, but watch for the warning signs.

  15. #15
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    Ilove running and in answer to the op yes it can help keep you in great shape whilst off the bike . More impact on the joints so try to stay on softer surfaces as much as possible and invest in a decent pair of running shoes

  16. #16
    toscano
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    Yessss, about running avarice on shoes is not a good idea

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Have any of you guys tried barefoot style of running? I do mostly cardio workouts and include running a couple of times a week. Last year I read Born to Run and starting running without heel strikes. All of my running related pains went away and my speed increased. It takes some practice but it's definitely easier on the body.

    BTW - if you haven't read Born to Run, it's a great book about running history, ultra marathons and personal drama of the writer venturing to Mexico to run with the Tarahumara Indians. And of course discussing barefoot running style an heel strike running style.
    Well, there's humans all over that have been walking using their heels besides those guys "just" on their balls, and I think the evolution of the human foot is pretty easy to see. If you look back in time, it wasn't always so, and running on the ball does have benefits. When I'm running in the mountains on rocks and ledges, the ball is all I can run on, but a "minimalist" glove-shoe wouldn't work due to all the sharp edges (kind of a parkour-type of running that I like to do). The story of those runners is amazing, but by no means unique or something that we were "missing". Martial arts stress the importance of staying only on the balls of your feet. Many sports stress using this as the primary guide/area for movement. The heel is there for a reason though, and its evolved to be helpful for walking and running.

    I have a friend that reads those books and then thinks it's the "only way" to see things. Atkins, the heel-runners, etc. It's not that there isn't some truth in all of these, it's just that it's not the entire truth and there's keys and fragments all over you put together to make the correct picture of reality.

    The way I see that running thing is that in a certain situation and environment, sure. In others, nope. Runners have known for a long time not to slam the heel down though and run on the ball as much as possible.

    I'm unable to ride right now due to cold and my bike in a different state. I've adapted though and so far -11F is not a detriment to me going out and running. It seems like I have to put on more layers and dress more carefully than an astronaut, but it's doable. Running is better than riding in terms of effort and time. I do riding (when I can) because I love it. I do running to help stay in shape. When I lost 50+lbs a few years ago, all my friends remarked about how I "must be riding much more". Nope, it's really hard to lose weight that way. You gotta keep the metabolism up, do a lot more than ride, regular exercise is way more important, even if it isn't always high impact, and so on. If you really want a lot of bang for the buck, try just core building, kinestetics, moderate muscle building and other strengthbuilding. That's actually been proven to burn more fat/hr than running, but it doesn't build the cardio capacity.

    About running, try to mix it up. Try to run on varied and uneven surfaces. Make sure there are some climbs and descents. Make sure to speed up and slow down. Those things make a big difference in your ability and performance. Also, spend the money to get fitted at a good running shop. It makes a big difference, at least it did for me.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  18. #18
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    Seriously, running is not for everyone, especially for me I've seen people run on the trail, they look like cat chasing prey, so effortless. I'm a complete opposite.

  19. #19
    duh
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    reported guess the spammers don't get christmas eve off huh
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    the big aussie rep bomb is comin your way

  20. #20
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    I am reported him too, looks like the mods r doing their job.

  21. #21
    Jeffro
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    Mix it up

    Avoid repetitive strain injuries by mixing up your routine. Run, MB, etc. I prefer trail running since it is lower impact and for the same reasons I prefer Mountain biking over Road biking..Nature.

  22. #22
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCMTB View Post
    Between bikes right now and I'm running to stay in shape. First day running killed me for a couple days after but my muscles have acclimated. Have been OTB (off the bike) for two weeks straight but running 4.5 miles every other day. I'll be back on a new bike in 2 weeks but if I keep up the running, how hard will it be to get back on the bike? I'd like to hear from runners whether its a viable temporary substitute and how painful its going to be to get back on the bike.
    A month off the bike? You'll be fine.

    Running is good for you - especially bone density and your aerobic fitness. You might use the time off the bike to also add some weight training as well (dead lifts, squats, lunges, upper body, step ups, etc...). Not heavy weights, but lots of reps with lighter weights and keep your legs as close to your cycling width as possible using correct lifting form.

    What about an exercise bike at the gym, school, work, friend's house....? Or renting a bike at least once or twice a week to keep the legs cycling oriented? If not, you'll be fine.

    Read this.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    A month off the bike? You'll be fine.

    Running is good for you - especially bone density and your aerobic fitness. You might use the time off the bike to also add some weight training as well (dead lifts, squats, lunges, upper body, step ups, etc...). Not heavy weights, but lots of reps with lighter weights and keep your legs as close to your cycling width as possible using correct lifting form.

    What about an exercise bike at the gym, school, work, friend's house....? Or renting a bike at least once or twice a week to keep the legs cycling oriented? If not, you'll be fine.

    Read this.
    Good advice. Just mainly want to keep the cardio up (and the weight down). I know my cycling muscles will come back although some of the technique might be off. Great responses from everyone. I went out and purchased a new $100 (mid range) pair of Asics and aftermarket insoles before I got too serious about the running thing. Last thing I need is to blow up my knees on a bad pair of shoes.
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