Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,056

    The Rhetoric of Bicycle Culture

    I work at a university and this course announcement just came into my in box from the University's bicycling coordinator, spreading the word. The course packet (scroll to the bottom) has many interesting titles.

    RHE309K The Rhetoric of Bicycle Culture
    Second Session: July 9-August 10

    Course Description:
    The bicycle—one of the simplest and most elegant of human inventions—is enjoying a quiet resurgence in twenty-first century American life, due in large part to growing concerns about obesity, global warming, urban sprawl, traffic congestion, and overpopulation. While this human-powered, cost-effective, efficient, low-impact machine seems to offer a solution to many of these problems, the integration of bicycles into a deeply entrenched American car culture is anything but simple. Bicycles and their advocates are on the frontlines of a political and cultural battle that will shape our transportation policies, our infrastructure, and our communities. This course will interrogate the many roles the bicycle has played historically as well as the numerous controversies it continues to engender: How does such an unassuming and seemingly innocuous machine provoke so much political and cultural debate? In what ways does the bicycle reshape local, national and global communities, and how do our transportation choices affect how we interact and engage with the world around us? During the course of the semester, we will investigate the bicycle’s role in pressing social, cultural, and political issues such as the history of women’s rights, socioeconomic inequality, the development of the third world, the fate of the modern and future city, and consumer culture. We will explore, analyze, and participate in numerous manifestations of bicycle culture, including political movements such as Critical Mass, the social function of group rides in youth (counter) culture, and the visual and cultural rhetoric employed by bike gangs, bike messengers, commuters, fixie fetishists, art bikes, tall bikes, BMX racers, mountain bikers, and competitive cyclists. Finally, we will examine the intersection of politics, community, and transportation choices by actively engaging with the local and national policies that will shape the future role of bicycles in America.

    Required Texts:
    Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (UT Custom Edition). Crowley and Stancliff. Penguin, 2011.
    Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

    Course Packet, to include selections from the following: Mark Twain’s “Taming the Bicycle”; H.G. Wells’ The Wheels of Chance; Frances Willard’s How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle; Samuel Beckett’s Molloy; Jeff Mapes’ Pedaling Revolution; David Byrne’s Bicycle Diaries; J. Harry Wray’s Pedal Power; Evan Schneider’s A Simple Machine, Like a Lever; David Herlihy’s Bicycle: The History; Amy Walker’s On Bicycles)

  2. #2
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,200
    that course packet book list looks pretty solid for anyone interested in bicycles.

    pray tell, what university is this? you have a bicycling coordinator? cool

  3. #3
    Call me Phred
    Reputation: Hundun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    282
    They should rename the course to The Rhetoric of Bicycles in Consumer Culture
    That would explain the obvious propagation of elitism without the need of bothering with a class.
    They also need a sub-section discussing the irony of how bike culture is dominated by cultural Marxists who won't be seen on anything less than upper line consumer products.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: B-Mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    742
    Quote Originally Posted by Hundun View Post
    They should rename the course to The Rhetoric of Bicycles in Consumer Culture
    That would explain the obvious propagation of elitism without the need of bothering with a class.
    They also need a sub-section discussing the irony of how bike culture is dominated by cultural Marxists who won't be seen on anything less than upper line consumer products.
    LOL! Last sentence = Truth.
    Check out my You Tube Channel

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,056
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    that course packet book list looks pretty solid for anyone interested in bicycles. pray tell, what university is this? you have a bicycling coordinator? cool
    Univ of Texas at Austin
    yep, an Alternative Transportation Manager and a Bike Coordinator
    I'm guessing about 40,000 faculty/students/staff head to campus at some point each day during the school year. Busy place.

  6. #6
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,200
    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Univ of Texas at Austin
    yep, an Alternative Transportation Manager and a Bike Coordinator
    I'm guessing about 40,000 faculty/students/staff head to campus at some point each day during the school year. Busy place.
    no doubt. no wonder we don't have such a position or course...much smaller campus.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,446
    Sounds like a class I would have taken to satisfy an elective.

    That said, there is a big difference between 'bicycle culture' and 'mountain biking culture' (if there is such a thing, that is). For example, consider the City of Portland, which is known to be very bike culture friendly. But it isn't a very good mountain biking town, due in part to the same culture -- typical bike culture isn't very pro riding on dirt trails in the woods!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  8. #8
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,200
    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    Sounds like a class I would have taken to satisfy an elective.

    That said, there is a big difference between 'bicycle culture' and 'mountain biking culture' (if there is such a thing, that is). For example, consider the City of Portland, which is known to be very bike culture friendly. But it isn't a very good mountain biking town, due in part to the same culture -- typical bike culture isn't very pro riding on dirt trails in the woods!
    Maybe, maybe not. There's quite a bit of crossover in some places. While I've certainly run across plenty of mtb riders that wouldn't touch any other sort of bike, I've probably run into at least as many others who do. And it's not always consistent. There's the ones who only ride BMX and mountain, or CX and mountain, or road and mountain or road, CX, and mountain, or commute and mountain. Others are not so picky and as long as it has 2 wheels, they'll ride it.

    I think it's a lot more effective to refer to it all as "bike culture" because there are most likely more similarities than differences, in spite of what our resident political pundits seem to think.

    I have a handful of friends who ride nothing but fixies on campus. In the end, they're riding bikes, too. Making fun of hipsters is the trendy thing to do, but funny thing is, most of the ones I know make fun of themselves just as much.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    212
    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Univ of Texas at Austin
    yep, an Alternative Transportation Manager and a Bike Coordinator
    I'm guessing about 40,000 faculty/students/staff head to campus at some point each day during the school year. Busy place.
    thats pretty sweet! i wanted to go there but i didnt get in...probably the best thing for me though since i have some of the best riding around me at school!

    on topic that sounds like a cool course that im surprised my school doesnt offer with how big the sport is in our area. we have a very active club where any of the board members would probably be able to teach the class! haha

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    I work at a university and this course announcement just came into my in box from the University's bicycling coordinator, spreading the word. The course packet (scroll to the bottom) has many interesting titles.

    RHE309K The Rhetoric of Bicycle Culture
    Second Session: July 9-August 10

    Course Description:
    The bicycle—one of the simplest and most elegant of human inventions—is enjoying a quiet resurgence in twenty-first century American life, due in large part to growing concerns about obesity, global warming, urban sprawl, traffic congestion, and overpopulation. While this human-powered, cost-effective, efficient, low-impact machine seems to offer a solution to many of these problems, the integration of bicycles into a deeply entrenched American car culture is anything but simple. Bicycles and their advocates are on the frontlines of a political and cultural battle that will shape our transportation policies, our infrastructure, and our communities. This course will interrogate the many roles the bicycle has played historically as well as the numerous controversies it continues to engender: How does such an unassuming and seemingly innocuous machine provoke so much political and cultural debate? In what ways does the bicycle reshape local, national and global communities, and how do our transportation choices affect how we interact and engage with the world around us? During the course of the semester, we will investigate the bicycle’s role in pressing social, cultural, and political issues such as the history of women’s rights, socioeconomic inequality, the development of the third world, the fate of the modern and future city, and consumer culture. We will explore, analyze, and participate in numerous manifestations of bicycle culture, including political movements such as Critical Mass, the social function of group rides in youth (counter) culture, and the visual and cultural rhetoric employed by bike gangs, bike messengers, commuters, fixie fetishists, art bikes, tall bikes, BMX racers, mountain bikers, and competitive cyclists. Finally, we will examine the intersection of politics, community, and transportation choices by actively engaging with the local and national policies that will shape the future role of bicycles in America.

    Required Texts:
    Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (UT Custom Edition). Crowley and Stancliff. Penguin, 2011.
    Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

    Course Packet, to include selections from the following: Mark Twain’s “Taming the Bicycle”; H.G. Wells’ The Wheels of Chance; Frances Willard’s How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle; Samuel Beckett’s Molloy; Jeff Mapes’ Pedaling Revolution; David Byrne’s Bicycle Diaries; J. Harry Wray’s Pedal Power; Evan Schneider’s A Simple Machine, Like a Lever; David Herlihy’s Bicycle: The History; Amy Walker’s On Bicycles)

    Wow. More proof that higher education is mostly an expensive scam and that most universities are high-priced diploma mills.

    I note with interest that the course description touches on all of the modern pseudo-intellectual talking points.

    I mean, seriously?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    592
    I imagine taking that course would cost about the same as a nice new wheelset.....

  12. #12
    Dirt Huffer
    Reputation: AC/BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,356
    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    Wow. More proof that higher education is mostly an expensive scam and that most universities are high-priced diploma mills.

    I note with interest that the course description touches on all of the modern pseudo-intellectual talking points.

    I mean, seriously?

    +2

    Yeah, no kidding. Dumb class is dumb.

  13. #13
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,200
    sad to see the terribly negative opinions on here about academic study.

    what's wrong with studying different ideas for the sake of studying different ideas? this sort of class is obviously intended to fulfill someone's elective requirements to get them to think a little outside the box.

    while I do agree that not every job out there needs the academic minimum requirements that are often listed, there's nothing wrong with lifelong study regardless of career path and that's the sort of thing that courses like this encourage.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    592
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    sad to see the terribly negative opinions on here about academic study.

    what's wrong with studying different ideas for the sake of studying different ideas? this sort of class is obviously intended to fulfill someone's elective requirements to get them to think a little outside the box.

    while I do agree that not every job out there needs the academic minimum requirements that are often listed, there's nothing wrong with lifelong study regardless of career path and that's the sort of thing that courses like this encourage.
    without trying to get away from the main theme of this thread...

    I think the opposite side of it is that a lot of kids today feel like they can go to college, study whatever the heck they want, and have some magic job waiting for them on the back end without a care in the world for how much that four years just cost. Unfortunately for them; that isn't the case...

    I do whole heartily encourage lifelong study of whatever you want. But it is courses like this that are a bit of a tell tale that the true cost of education has been hidden a bit from the consumer (student). I know I probably wouldn't spend the $800 or however much that course is to actually take it.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    14
    Jane Bug, does UT offer any biking type courses as a kinesiology class? I've taken two semesters of Mountain Biking at Texas A&M (one as a student and one as a TA) and I must say I love seeing new riders get involved in something new and not just using their bikes as a weight to keep the campus bike racks from flying away.


    Whether it be a course on the culture of bicycles or an actual riding class, I see it as much more beneficial in real life application then are the 3 semesters of art history I was required to take. I too am surprised by all the education haters.

  16. #16
    Rep Power: Infinity
    Reputation: NateHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,200
    Quote Originally Posted by patrick2cents View Post
    without trying to get away from the main theme of this thread...

    I think the opposite side of it is that a lot of kids today feel like they can go to college, study whatever the heck they want, and have some magic job waiting for them on the back end without a care in the world for how much that four years just cost. Unfortunately for them; that isn't the case...

    I do whole heartily encourage lifelong study of whatever you want. But it is courses like this that are a bit of a tell tale that the true cost of education has been hidden a bit from the consumer (student). I know I probably wouldn't spend the $800 or however much that course is to actually take it.
    oh, that happens. but unless mommy and daddy are paying the whole bill, I don't think there's as many folks who think of the cost of education the way you think. a lot of students will face that cost one day or another. maybe they're not thinking about it while they're in school immediately, but it's going to hit them later in the form of student loan bills and they'll be acutely aware of it.

    if I was in school right now and had a list of required credits I had to get in my major (whether I liked them or not) and a list of elective courses, I'd use my few electives on something that interested me. if this class would have fulfilled my phych/sociology requirement, I'd much rather have taken it than the "Psychology and Sociology of Sport" course that I ended up taking as an undergrad. I managed to get out of a lot of required classes through AP testing, and for them, I actually wound up mostly taking stuff in my major or minor. I did not get out of the psych/soc requirement, though.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    oh, that happens. but unless mommy and daddy are paying the whole bill, I don't think there's as many folks who think of the cost of education the way you think. a lot of students will face that cost one day or another. maybe they're not thinking about it while they're in school immediately, but it's going to hit them later in the form of student loan bills and they'll be acutely aware of it.

    if I was in school right now and had a list of required credits I had to get in my major (whether I liked them or not) and a list of elective courses, I'd use my few electives on something that interested me. if this class would have fulfilled my phych/sociology requirement, I'd much rather have taken it than the "Psychology and Sociology of Sport" course that I ended up taking as an undergrad. I managed to get out of a lot of required classes through AP testing, and for them, I actually wound up mostly taking stuff in my major or minor. I did not get out of the psych/soc requirement, though.

    Sure. That makes sense. I had a few "humanities" electives required in my major (Civil Engineering) so there was a huge temptation to take something ridiculously easy/stupid/gut/MIckey Mouse to avoid adding to an already large workload but that's just human nature.

    But many people in universities take nothing but this kind of course essentially earning worthless degrees devoid of even the slightest academic rigor. I am, in fact, something of an elitist and believe that universities are mostly bogus because they will tailor a degree program to fit any level of academic ability no matter how low that may be. My university had remedial math and english for incoming freshmen for Christ's sake. I graded some of their papers as a graduate student and they wrote on a third-grade level.

    The University doesn't care. All they want are warm bodies from which they can suck as many federal financial aid dollars as possible.
    Last edited by Ailuropoda; 06-11-2012 at 11:35 PM.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Jesus. Fer' real? I guess that's why college tuition is what it is. To support a lot of dead weight.

    I'm all for riding your bike to school but does putting up a bunch of bike racks really need a coordinator?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    sad to see the terribly negative opinions on here about academic study.

    what's wrong with studying different ideas for the sake of studying different ideas? this sort of class is obviously intended to fulfill someone's elective requirements to get them to think a little outside the box.

    while I do agree that not every job out there needs the academic minimum requirements that are often listed, there's nothing wrong with lifelong study regardless of career path and that's the sort of thing that courses like this encourage.
    Dude, I am not against academic study. I have a Medical Degree and have studied more than the entire Womyn's Studies department at any university you care to name.

    But academic study should be rigorous and difficult which is not the case any more in most fields. How about requiring Liberal Arts majors to learn Latin, Hebrew, or Greek as was done in the old days? Or having those majoring in fuzzy studies take some calculus and physics classes to really give them a well-rounded education?

    As someone pointed out, when you spend four to six years in college playing at studying and then get out to find you are useless for any occupation...well...maybe you should have learned a trade.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbikerider106 View Post
    Jane Bug, does UT offer any biking type courses as a kinesiology class? I've taken two semesters of Mountain Biking at Texas A&M (one as a student and one as a TA) and I must say I love seeing new riders get involved in something new and not just using their bikes as a weight to keep the campus bike racks from flying away.


    Whether it be a course on the culture of bicycles or an actual riding class, I see it as much more beneficial in real life application then are the 3 semesters of art history I was required to take. I too am surprised by all the education haters.
    Dude....riding a bike is not complicated. You pretty much get on, pedal, and avoid obstacles. "Bike Culture" is entirely artificial, driven by fads and fashion, and makes about as much sense studying as "Crock Pot Culture." I have a lot of bikes, I ride almost every day, and while I love nothing better than a two-hour brutal slog up and down our local heartbreak ridge you'd be hard-pressed to pick me out as an avid mountain-biker because it's just a recreational activity that means nothing to what I really do and my real responsibilities in life.

    Sure, most of my colleagues know I'm something of a nut about bicycles but I don't wear cleats to work or speak in strange cycling slang.

    As for being "beneficial in real life applications," you need to make up your mind as to the purpose of higher education. Do you really need to spend $20,000 per annum to learn how to ride a bike?

    Education hater indeed. I value education but am appalled at the travesty it has become at every level of our pathetic society.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    Dude....riding a bike is not complicated. You pretty much get on, pedal, and avoid obstacles. "Bike Culture" is entirely artificial, driven by fads and fashion, and makes about as much sense studying as "Crock Pot Culture." I have a lot of bikes, I ride almost every day, and while I love nothing better than a two-hour brutal slog up and down our local heartbreak ridge you'd be hard-pressed to pick me out as an avid mountain-biker because it's just a recreational activity that means nothing to what I really do and my real responsibilities in life.

    Sure, most of my colleagues know I'm something of a nut about bicycles but I don't wear cleats to work or speak in strange cycling slang.

    As for being "beneficial in real life applications," you need to make up your mind as to the purpose of higher education. Do you really need to spend $20,000 per annum to learn how to ride a bike?

    Education hater indeed. I value education but am appalled at the travesty it has become at every level of our pathetic society.

    You seem to have quite the knowledge on the inner workings of the university system...where did you study?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    sad to see the terribly negative opinions on here about academic study.

    what's wrong with studying different ideas for the sake of studying different ideas? this sort of class is obviously intended to fulfill someone's elective requirements to get them to think a little outside the box.

    while I do agree that not every job out there needs the academic minimum requirements that are often listed, there's nothing wrong with lifelong study regardless of career path and that's the sort of thing that courses like this encourage.
    I agree with everything that has been said about the problems with going to school just for the sake of going to school, and failing to actually learn anything useful there that will help kids get jobs. College should be hard. Very hard, at times. If it isn't, the student isn't getting much out of it.

    That said, I'm all for expanding a little, and taking an elective class or two that might encourage one to think about something new, or learn something that may be totally impractical as far as employment, but otherwise helps one learn how the world works.

    For example, two of the "best" classes I took in undergrad were a Humanities (music) and Intro to Metorology. Have I used either of those classes in my employment? Nope, not one bit. But they exposed me to things I didn't already know, gave me a chance to think about something new (which are skills that I do use in my job every day, as I'm constantly learning about new things or trying to think outside the box). And helped me learn something new about music and the weather, which are always around me.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Maybe, maybe not. There's quite a bit of crossover in some places. While I've certainly run across plenty of mtb riders that wouldn't touch any other sort of bike, I've probably run into at least as many others who do. And it's not always consistent. There's the ones who only ride BMX and mountain, or CX and mountain, or road and mountain or road, CX, and mountain, or commute and mountain. Others are not so picky and as long as it has 2 wheels, they'll ride it.

    I think it's a lot more effective to refer to it all as "bike culture" because there are most likely more similarities than differences, in spite of what our resident political pundits seem to think.

    I have a handful of friends who ride nothing but fixies on campus. In the end, they're riding bikes, too. Making fun of hipsters is the trendy thing to do, but funny thing is, most of the ones I know make fun of themselves just as much.
    I agree that there can be, and perhaps should be, a lot of cross-over, and everyone should be happy that people are just riding bikes. And of course, there are plenty of fixie hipsters who also like to ride mtb's. But looking at the class description, it appears directed more towards bikes as transportation alternatives, and actually classifies mountain bikers as a cultural subset or offshoot, along with bike gangs, bmx'ers, and so forth, and endeavors to analyze their subcultural rhetoric and, I expect, esoteric behaivors that make them different from the transportation cyclist.

    Believe me, living in the PNW, I've had more than one conversation with a cultural cyclist who either ended the conversation or became irate once it became clear that my interest in bikes was soley for fun, and I have no interest in replacing my vehicles or anything like that.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    Dude....riding a bike is not complicated. You pretty much get on, pedal, and avoid obstacles. "Bike Culture" is entirely artificial, driven by fads and fashion, and makes about as much sense studying as "Crock Pot Culture." I have a lot of bikes, I ride almost every day, and while I love nothing better than a two-hour brutal slog up and down our local heartbreak ridge you'd be hard-pressed to pick me out as an avid mountain-biker because it's just a recreational activity that means nothing to what I really do and my real responsibilities in life.

    Sure, most of my colleagues know I'm something of a nut about bicycles but I don't wear cleats to work or speak in strange cycling slang.

    As for being "beneficial in real life applications," you need to make up your mind as to the purpose of higher education. Do you really need to spend $20,000 per annum to learn how to ride a bike?

    Education hater indeed. I value education but am appalled at the travesty it has become at every level of our pathetic society.

    This is not a major, you don't get a degree in cycling, it's simply a class that satisfies a breadth requirement, on the way to a degree in what may be a completely unrelated topic. Sometimes its nice to have an elective on a lighter subject when the rest of your schedule is full of upper division courses and labs.

    I see your argument about how people, "take nothing but this kind of course essentially earning worthless degrees devoid of even the slightest academic rigor" as a veiled jab at those with degrees in the humanities or other non-scientific majors. So what, some people don't want to be engineers.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonCz View Post
    This is not a major, you don't get a degree in cycling, it's simply a class that satisfies a breadth requirement, on the way to a degree in what may be a completely unrelated topic. Sometimes its nice to have an elective on a lighter subject when the rest of your schedule is full of upper division courses and labs.

    I see your argument about how people, "take nothing but this kind of course essentially earning worthless degrees devoid of even the slightest academic rigor" as a veiled jab at those with degrees in the humanities or other non-scientific majors. So what, some people don't want to be engineers.
    Humanities...Liberal Arts...used to be very tough and back in the days before the easy availability of federal financial aid turned universities into diploma mills and warehouses for the indolent you had to work for any degree and for the most part no matter what your major you had to work your way through a rigorous and difficult course of study.

    Today it is mostly just posturing. No real academic talent? Major in Psychology, sociology, or one of numerous dumbed-down curricula. You give the university five years worth of borrowed money, they give you a worthless scrap of paper.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •