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  1. #1
    the half breed devil
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    reviving the dead horse one more time--suspension seatposts

    i will now make my contribution to the Dead Horse Beating Sweepstakes....suspension seatposts.

    i did a forum search and got five hundred results which i am NOT going to winnow through.

    my bike is a steel framed 2011 marin pine mountain 29'er with the 100mm rock shox recon up front, i ride lots of fire roads but also some rough singletrack not to mention the fact that almost all of my rides are between twenty and thirty miles.

    tell me about suspension seatposts--my riding buddy is suggesting i try one to make the longer rides a little easier for my fifty year old bones. is the weight penalty worth it? is there any motion while pedaling? which are better, telescoping or parallelogram elastomer systems? would i be better off with a carbon seatpost?

    i see that some offer a good bit of travel at what seems to be a decent price:

    Cane Creek Thudbuster Lt 27.2x400 Suspension Post Black ST3272K

    is this thing going to move up and down like my superlight used to?

    throw anything you know, have heard or think about suspension seatposts at me. i'm interested in reading what everyone has to say.

  2. #2
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    The best suspension seat post IMHO is the Thudbuster ST. You won't even notice its there other than the ride will be much smoother. The weight penalty is definitely worth it. The LT has too much travel so it can feel weird when it compresses a lot and changes your pedal stroke. The parralelogram designs are better because telescoping seatposts tend to bind on smaller bumps due to your weight not being straight down on the post but at an angle.
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  3. #3
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    I've ridden the ST it's pretty good, but a cheap but flexy 27.2mm post with loads out works well enough to and a high volume 2.4 in the rear, yes you'll have to use a shim, carbon would help to Easton EC70 I think it is a mates got and loads of movement from it.

    Telescopics bind pretty much full time, you only really get travel when you stand up and sit back down again, i ran a cable tie around mine years ago and no impact movement at all even riding down a kerb feet off the pedals.

  4. #4
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    Agreed. Have an ST and you can adjust the stiffness with different rubber that should come with. Even on my super light titanium I consider the weight a non issue to have softer hits without any pedal power loss. Some say they kick back but again, IMO, a non issue with the right rubber for your weight. I actually miss that little kick sometimes when riding without, it reminds me I shoulda been on the pedals more but without pain.
    Last edited by theMeat; 02-01-2012 at 07:35 PM.
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  5. #5
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    I have a thudbuster LT. I went back to a straight post because I didn't really feel the benefit. You end up standing over roots and small rocks the same as you would on a regular seat post. I think I'd rather have a softtail moots or something similar. Just a little bit to take the edge off. The TB tends to want to throw you a bit when you ride over humps. It works a little on bumps, but riding over humps the seat compresses and then tosses you when you get to the other side. YMMV.

  6. #6
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    Another good option is a Brooks saddle. Have one on my road bike and often switch it to 1 of my mtbs when I know it's gonna be a long day. Talk about all day comfort.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  7. #7
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    I use a sette ryde and its been working great for a year mtb

  8. #8
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    A lot to be said for a seat with loads of padding to, if your in the UK the halfords 17 seat I think it was is really comfy and lasts ages without going all creaky.


    The ST I used to get stuck behind it and it would rotate forward for a scarey I can't get back on moment, but never caused a real issue.

    Those Softtails are wayyyy more than even a quality FS frame there just scarey.

  9. #9
    Retired User
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    Bought a thudbuster years ago and never use it now. I never experienced any pedal bob, but also never felt like I experienced much benefit. I feel like it's an expensive accessory that provides minimal gain. I ride a rigid SS 29er for one of my primary bikes now, and would say that a good, well fitted saddle will provide more benefit than a SSP..

  10. #10
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    I'm a total noob so take that into account before you all chime in about my riding technique. I know that more than you can tell me. I weigh in at 180 and am 59. Also I ride a lot of roots and rocks.

    Before I bought my GT Avalanche, I rented a Specialized Rockhopper. Riding the Specialized, my lower back ached beyond description after a couple of hours. So I put a ThudBuster LT on the GT at purchase and have never ridden it without it. Its a 31.6 seat post if it matters. I've got the TB cranked to about 75% on the medium elastomer. It doesn't seem to affect my pedaling unless I really back off tension on the elastomer. But my back no longer aches. That's one in the win column for me.

  11. #11
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    had a thudbuster. IMO they're great for road riding, but off-road, if you're going thru a rough section of trail, you should be on the pedals--off the seat--so the suspension doesn't help. also, since they're not damped (just a spring), they tend to launch you when you go over a big bump. I got a FS bike and never looked back.
    whatever...

  12. #12
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    I've got a thudbuster lt on my superfly SS. I stand when I climb and I stand when i'm descending. I was getting beat up on the flats when I just wanted to sit and spin. The thudbuster does a great job soaking up the bumps and gives me a chance to recover for the next set of up and downs.

  13. #13
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    I have the Thudbuster LT that I use on and off with my 29er hardtail. I feel it works as advertised, weighs far less than a similar rear suspension bike and is much easier to maintain.

  14. #14
    trail addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    I've ridden the ST it's pretty good, but a cheap but flexy 27.2mm post with loads out works well enough to and a high volume 2.4 in the rear, yes you'll have to use a shim, carbon would help to Easton EC70 I think it is a mates got and loads of movement from it.
    uh, what?
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

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