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  1. #1
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    Reducing chain slap?

    I just got a new rocky mountain slayer and went out on my second ride today. There was alot of roots on the section that i was riding and noticed that I was getting some chain slap through the rough areas. I also noticed on the truck ride to the trails (I carry the bike mounted above the bed) that my chain seems like there isn't enough tension as it was shaking quite a bit in the wind. I never noticed any of this with my old bike. Are there any remedies to this problem?

  2. #2
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    Some of the newer, more expensive derailleurs have adjustments to lessen chainslap. You might check to see if yours does. Also, you can correct it to some extent by your gear selection (big ring in front, towards the middle in back, fer instance). You may have had it in a more slack gear when it was in the truck.

    Have your shop check to see if you have as many links of the chain taken out as possible and still be able to use all your gears.

    Also, a lot of people wrap the chainstay with some sort of tape; the chain is still slappin', you just can't hear it as well.

    Any chance you can convert to a singlespeed? No worries about chainslap then.
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  3. #3
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    I have used one of these for about 6 months with good results.
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  4. #4
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    Check out the new rear derailleurs with built in clutches. I've got one of those on my bike (SRAM X0 Type 2) and it has worked well.

    That chain guide looks promising though.

  5. #5
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    I use sticky backed velcro (fuzzy side, not the hooks) on my chainstay to help keep things quiet.

    Bionicon also makes a pretty nice guide that helps - but it is pricey ($50)

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Check out the new rear derailleurs with built in clutches. I've got one of those on my bike (SRAM X0 Type 2) and it has worked well.

    That chain guide looks promising though.
    Are any of these new clutch type derailleurs available in 9speed? I was looking at the sram one as i have sram shifters etc but couldnt find a 9 speed...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reign2Rider View Post
    Are any of these new clutch type derailleurs available in 9speed? I was looking at the sram one as i have sram shifters etc but couldnt find a 9 speed...
    Nope. Unfortunately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reign2Rider View Post
    Are any of these new clutch type derailleurs available in 9speed? I was looking at the sram one as i have sram shifters etc but couldnt find a 9 speed...
    You can use a 9-speed SRAM shifter with the Type 2 rear derailleur and it should work OK. All the indexing is done by the shifter pods and not in the derailleur. You may have to run a 10-speed chain (at the expense of a slightly shorter chain life) because the cage is a hair narrower than a 9-speed derailleur.

    -S

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    You can use a 9-speed SRAM shifter with the Type 2 rear derailleur and it should work OK. All the indexing is done by the shifter pods and not in the derailleur. You may have to run a 10-speed chain (at the expense of a slightly shorter chain life) because the cage is a hair narrower than a 9-speed derailleur.

    -S
    The parallelogram is different with the SRAM 10speed derailleurs. I don't believe it would work in my opinion.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    You can use a 9-speed SRAM shifter with the Type 2 rear derailleur and it should work OK. All the indexing is done by the shifter pods and not in the derailleur. You may have to run a 10-speed chain (at the expense of a slightly shorter chain life) because the cage is a hair narrower than a 9-speed derailleur.

    -S
    No. Wrong. The rear dr is different and not compatible. What you said was true for 8 to 9 spd, but not so for 9 to 10spd

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiNBike View Post
    The parallelogram is different with the SRAM 10speed derailleurs. I don't believe it would work in my opinion.
    The pull ratios are very close. Regular SRAM 1:1 ratio is really 1.1:1 (from documentation) and the SRAM 10-speed "Exact Actuation" pull ratio is 1.2:1 (measured by yours truly).

    I started messing around with the 9-10 speed mix and matching last week just to satisfy my personal curiousity....then again I expected to catch crap for posting the info.

    -S
    Last edited by shibiwan; 11-23-2012 at 02:21 PM.

  13. #13
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    I've been running one of these things for quite a while now and it keeps the chain slappy noise down pretty well... Blackspire Stinger Chain Guide at Price Point

  14. #14
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    Bionicon

    The Bionicon Chain Guide works well, but doesn't completely stop chain slap. At least 50% better with it on.... But then again, I beat the crap out of my bike on downhills.

    I have a 9-speed long cage XTR Shadow deraileur with 3 chainrings up front on my Yeti 575.

  15. #15
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    I've been using the Bionicon chain guide on my bike, going on 10+ months. It really works. My only critique is... How crazy expensive it is !!!

  16. #16
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    I don't know for Sram derailleur but on Shimano there are 2 positions for the spring and the factory position is the softest. It's a bit of a hassle to change but it is a good opportunity to clean and grease thoroughly your derailleur!

  17. #17
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    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this (or maybe I just missed it)

    Make sure your chain is as short as possible. Put the bike in the 2 big rings and your derailleur should be pulled forward about as far as possible. conceivably you could go shorter, as one doesn't intentionally use big-big, but if you accidentally did, you could damage your derailleur.

    Manufacturers often just use a length that will work, not the one that is optimal, as this takes more time and $.

  18. #18
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this (or maybe I just missed it)

    Make sure your chain is as short as possible. Put the bike in the 2 big rings and your derailleur should be pulled forward about as far as possible. conceivably you could go shorter, as one doesn't intentionally use big-big, but if you accidentally did, you could damage your derailleur.

    Manufacturers often just use a length that will work, not the one that is optimal, as this takes more time and $.
    Have your shop check to see if you have as many links of the chain taken out as possible and still be able to use all your gears.
    I believe I covered everything in my post, I don't know why people are even bothering to post anymore.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this (or maybe I just missed it)

    Make sure your chain is as short as possible. Put the bike in the 2 big rings and your derailleur should be pulled forward about as far as possible. conceivably you could go shorter, as one doesn't intentionally use big-big, but if you accidentally did, you could damage your derailleur.

    Manufacturers often just use a length that will work, not the one that is optimal, as this takes more time and $.
    yup big to big should have the RD stretched right out....(I ride big big from time to time)..

    Also ride smooth....

    Also ride in with the chain tighter.

    Most downhills around here can easily be ridden in the big ring....when you get a short up grab a handful of gears on the RD, and hammer up the hill....works great and helps maintain flow.

    Don't worry about Xchaining just make sure you drivetrain is set up for it and for the few strokes it takes it will be fine.

  20. #20
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    Here is a guide on some basic chain length pointers. There are considerations for 1x and 2x drivetrains and FS or HT bikes.

    http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Tech-Tu...sics-2012.html

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Most downhills around here can easily be ridden in the big ring....when you get a short up grab a handful of gears on the RD, and hammer up the hill....works great and helps maintain flow.

    Don't worry about Xchaining just make sure you drivetrain is set up for it and for the few strokes it takes it will be fine.
    I want to second that cross chaining isn't a big worry, at least when you're in the big ring. For a given gear ratio, the smaller your front ring the more tension in the chain, so by choosing your big ring you have more unloaded tension in your chain but also less tension in your chain when you're pedaling hard. win-win unless cross chaining is horrendously bad.

  22. #22
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    If it were me and the bike shifted well as it is, I'd leave well enough alone and wrap the chain stay to prevent the damage from the slap. No need to look for problems.
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  23. #23
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    Good chain technique vs. spending money on a gizmo.
    I don't rattle.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    Good chain technique vs. spending money on a gizmo.
    it could be Good chain technique + spending money on a gizmo.

    I tend to go for the former though. However, i can't disagree with anyone who wants a quiet bike. I like to bounce my bike and hear the sounds of a basket ball not a dropped drawer full of silverware.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Check out the new rear derailleurs with built in clutches. I've got one of those on my bike (SRAM X0 Type 2) and it has worked well.

    That chain guide looks promising though.
    X2, I have never had chainslap with my X0 type 2 (I've also never had a 1x10 until this bike so it may be related

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