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  1. #1
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    Rear wheel spins out on steep climbs

    I recently bought a lightish HT for local XC races. I haven't ridden a HT in a few years and I'm trying different techniques than I use on my FS bike.

    When I get to the steepest part of the climb I'm shifting up a gear or two and standing up to attack the section. Yesterday my rear tire spun out on the 2 steepest sections and I reflexively shifted to a higher gear. But continued to slip out until I slowed down - not what I want to do.

    Should I have shifted to a lower gear when the slipping started? Or gradually shifted up once I stand up and begin applying power? Tires are new Bontrager XR2, but I'm sure this is a technique issue, not an equipment problem.

    Any tips would be appreciated.

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    When you stand while climbing, you take weight off the rear wheel and risk slippage in the back. Full suspensions are better climbers for techie loose stuff. They allow you to sit and spin, keeping the weight on the rear while the rear shock does its work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    When you stand while climbing, you take weight off the rear wheel and risk slippage in the back. Full suspensions are better climbers for techie loose stuff. They allow you to sit and spin, keeping the weight on the rear while the rear shock does its work.
    Exactly. Like I said, I'm trying new techniques on the HT. I see other racers standing in those sections, so there must be ways to adjust your weight or gearing.

  4. #4
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    Pull down & back on your handlebar, equally on both sides, as you apply power on each pedal stroke. Hard to describe accurately (for me anyway).

    Edit: This works in seated and "semi-standing" positions, not so great fully standing.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    Exactly. Like I said, I'm trying new techniques on the HT. I see other racers standing in those sections, so there must be ways to adjust your weight or gearing.
    Every bike is going to be unique and you'll have to figure it out. Nobody can say "do specifically this" and expect it to work the same for you as for others.

    You're going to have to experiment to see what's necessary for you to avoid spinning out in that spot.

    For me, on my particular FS bike, I cannot "stand up" to attack steep climbs the way I used to be able to do on previous bikes I owned (both HT and FS bikes). Even though it's a fatbike, doing so takes too much weight off the rear end and I spin out, just like you. So I had to experiment with other positions, to ensure that I kept enough weight on the rear for traction. I don't like it so much from a power production standpoint, but sliding forward and "perching" my taint on the nose of the saddle addresses the traction issues when I also need to ensure the front wheel stays planted.

    Anyway, this is why it's important to maintain the ability to move around over the bike. You want to be able to make adjustments like this on the fly. I'm not able to get it all the time, but frequently I can. There are some situations where I really need a couple good power strokes I can only get from standing up and putting my full body weight plus some upper body into it. So I will stand for power, and then as soon as the tire starts to break loose, I'll adjust for traction to maintain momentum. It's all very dynamic.

    Pretty soon, I'll be building a new bike, and that's going to force me to adjust to it, because it's going to be quite a bit different than my current bike. Maybe I'll be able to stand up and attack climbs again. Maybe it'll be more like my current bike. Maybe it'll be something entirely new and I'll have to figure something else out.

  6. #6
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    What tire pressures are you running, russinthecascades? FWIW I ride the Cascades, too.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    Exactly. Like I said, I'm trying new techniques on the HT. I see other racers standing in those sections, so there must be ways to adjust your weight or gearing.
    I guess it depends on your definition of steep. I was thinking very steep climbs when standing is always a detriment (even for XC racers).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post

    sliding forward and "perching" my taint on the nose of the saddle addresses the traction issues when I also need to ensure the front wheel stays planted.
    This is my solution

  9. #9
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    Body english ^^

    When equipment can't get you up... throw your weight around (literally)

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Pull down & back on your handlebar, equally on both sides, as you apply power on each pedal stroke. Hard to describe accurately (for me anyway).

    Edit: This works in seated and "semi-standing" positions, not so great fully standing.
    Ya, this is it.

    To put it another way, you still have to be the suspension while you're standing, and you still need to keep as much weight on top of the rear wheel as you can. So you end up doing this 'hover' thing where you're trying to keep your upper body still as your legs produce (smooth!!) power and act as suspension at the same time. You end up lightly pushing/pulling on the handlebar to keep your body in the right space and yourself smooth.

    When you really get the technique down it still ends up being kinda tiring, but it's crazy what you can motor up. Then the skill translates back to your FS bike.



    If the terrain is smooth and loose the advice to scootch your butt forward and pedal smoothly is great. I don't bother to upshift, personally, cuz i can apply power more smoothly spinning a low gear. You still end up using the bars to drive the rear wheel in to the dirt when your traction is best. Small changes to your cockpit set up can make a big difference, especially if you're tall.
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    Maybe you could give max effort earlier and less effort where the traction is more critical.
    You need perfect timing and technique to stand and apply max pressure at the steepest part but like mentioned before you can practice and find a solution to a tough situation.
    Personally to improve i do the same section where i failed daily for about 10 days, testing a different gear, start slow, med, fast and out of that 1 usualy 1 solution emerge. Allways mental focus is a plus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Pull down & back on your handlebar, equally on both sides, as you apply power on each pedal stroke. Hard to describe accurately (for me anyway).

    Edit: This works in seated and "semi-standing" positions, not so great fully standing.
    I know exactly what you mean, hard to demonstrate but the way I explain it to people is to imagine they they're trying to rotate the rear wheel down using only the grips.
    Pressures are critical also, don't run 30 psi (even tubed) unless you're over the mid 250 lbs.
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    Pretty hard to say without being there and seeing what you're doing and what the section of trail looks like.

    But, it sounds as though, when you stand up, you may be "mashing", i.e. varying your output instead of putting in steady torque.
    Last edited by MSU Alum; 1 Week Ago at 07:30 AM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    What tire pressures are you running, russinthecascades? FWIW I ride the Cascades, too.
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    22 front / 24 rear.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    22 front / 24 rear.
    Sounds reasonable. I think Harold hit the taint on the nose of the saddle with his advice for weighting the rear tire while um... semi-standing. Thatís how I maintain traction on absurdly steep slopes, anyway. Taint on the nose and as little air pressure in my tires as I can get away with.
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  16. #16
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    I've noticed traction loss while standing too, but on my FS bike.

    I have been practicing with a more rearward standing position. I try to keep my hips hovering over where the saddle would be. Seems to work great, to the point I've tried to give the tip to other beginners. The older vet riders tend to ignore the advice though.

  17. #17
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    One thing Iíve been training is sitting as much as possible. Every time I stand I slow down, even though it feels better and there is some relief (and it looks way cooler). So Iíve been doing my intervals and everything else sitting and ďscreamingĒ to myself when racing to stay seated. As far as I can tell, this is helping. Even though I still stand for tech, Iím really minimizing it when climbing and riding level ground and itís faster for me. Got to be real careful on those ďsprint at the top of the climbĒ scenarios because thatís often where Iíd slow down while out of the saddle even though it ďfeltĒ faster.
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  18. #18
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    Harold and One Ring described the technique well...point of the saddle in the 'nethers, pulling back (think rowing the boat) on the bars. The only thing I'd add, is that you can practice this posture on less steep climbs. It's not a natural position to transition too or to develop power from, so get comfortable with it someplace easier. Also know that even when you do it right, you can still break it free and will crack your kneecap on the stem or bars hard enough your shoes might fly off. In my hardtail days, I always had a stem pad ( pipe insulation and electrical tape variety). There's also no part of riding a bike that isn't helped by a smooth pedal stroke.
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    I agree a bout the sitting down. My first year i never climbed out of saddle, i consider seating the basic position. Even if you loose 1 sec climbing you will be resting instead of wasting energy and just explode at the top when the traction is good to win seconds. Now i practice standing for the fun ot it, to have more tools but in the winter in snow we learn not to overpush to keep traction. Imagine you are on ice and it might help.

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    Hardtails have less traction, so you have to control your power output more. Slow down in order to have a starting point where you successfully make the climb, work on that and you'll get faster at it.

    A higher gear has always worked for me in technical climbing.

  21. #21
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    Pull back more.

    Jeez.
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  22. #22
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    I ride FS and HT Singlespeed. When on steep climbs on my singlespeed I can slip the rear tire if the terrain is not idea and body position is not right. Most of the time I am working to keep the front end down and standing on my SS really helps that. However too much weight in front can cause the rear to slip. If that happens I will have to focus on less weight up front and more to the back. So that does mean shifting my body weight when standing. Hard to describe, but critical. Kind of like moving my butt back. It is important when standing climbing to get this right.
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  23. #23
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    Seated climbing is why I ride Selle SMP saddles on my mountain bikes. By far, the most taint friendly saddles I've ever ridden. The only time I leave the saddle while climbing is if I have to lunge the bike forward over an obstacle.

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  24. #24
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    You're running 24 rear for which XR2 Team tire on which width rim?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    I recently bought a lightish HT for local XC races. I haven't ridden a HT in a few years and I'm trying different techniques than I use on my FS bike.

    When I get to the steepest part of the climb I'm shifting up a gear or two and standing up to attack the section. Yesterday my rear tire spun out on the 2 steepest sections and I reflexively shifted to a higher gear. But continued to slip out until I slowed down - not what I want to do.

    Should I have shifted to a lower gear when the slipping started? Or gradually shifted up once I stand up and begin applying power? Tires are new Bontrager XR2, but I'm sure this is a technique issue, not an equipment problem.

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    No one asked what gearing he has in front/back???

    Hey Russ, what gearing are you using in the front and back during these climbs? lol

    I used to try the stand-up method, but now that I have a 0.55 ratio (22/40), I can climb all but the steepest stuff without much of an issue just sitting on the seat. It's a crawl but it works.
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You're running 24 rear for which XR2 Team tire on which width rim?
    XR2 Team Issue, 120 tpi, run tubeless. 27 mm Bontrager rims. I'm going to a hub with more engagement, will also switch rims. Probably to Stans Crest MK3, which virtually the same width.

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    The OP is asking in the context of racing and attacking up climbs. Not crawling at walking pace. There is a time and place for that, but not if you want to be fast.

    Standing and charging up a climb can be the fastest way up shorter climbs. Just need the proper technique and gear selection to make it work.

    This one reason why SS can be so fast. You simple have to charge up the hills as there is no alternative with a 34x19 gearing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    No one asked what gearing he has in front/back???

    Hey Russ, what gearing are you using in the front and back during these climbs? lol

    I used to try the stand-up method, but now that I have a 0.55 ratio (22/40), I can climb all but the steepest stuff without much of an issue just sitting on the seat. It's a crawl but it works.
    30T chainring, Eagle NX cassette. I'd guestimate on both of those climbs was in cog 9 or 10 (32/36T) and shifted up at least a couple of cogs, so probably in the 25-28T range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    The OP is asking in the context of racing and attacking up climbs. Not crawling at walking pace. There is a time and place for that, but not if you want to be fast.

    Standing and charging up a climb can be the fastest way up shorter climbs. Just need the proper technique and gear selection to make it work.

    This one reason why SS can be so fast. You simple have to charge up the hills as there is no alternative with a 34x19 gearing.
    Yes, I'm trying to go fast, but maybe my strategy is wrong. Perhaps I should be standing before or/and after a steep section where I would lose traction. Then sit on the nose for sections to maximize traction. I'm sure as I get more experience shifting weight around the transition points will change.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    Yes, I'm trying to go fast, but maybe my strategy is wrong. Perhaps I should be standing before or/and after a steep section where I would lose traction. Then sit on the nose for sections to maximize traction. I'm sure as I get more experience shifting weight around the transition points will change.
    No way for me to know for sure since I don't know your trails. However since I ride both SS and FS geared in races I often wonder what is the fastest way up some stuff. The shorter the climb the value from staying in gear and just charge up a climb. I have seen it racing SS plenty of times where a geared guy starts dropping gears and speed when I am accelerating to charge up a climb. I fly right by as they are spinning like crazy. As climbs get longer and steeper the geared guys can start catching up.

    So when racing geared the stand and hammer works best when you keep it in big gear and hit a dip and need to climb our or hit quick short climb. It is not as effective when you are already going slow unless the grade pitches up for a short bit or you need to hammer over a rock garden. You pretty much have to stand for rocky climbs on a HT to not get bounced around. Of course the trick is to really see what works best for you given the trail, entry speed, fitness and skill level. The goal is to be fast not cool so you want to find the technique and gear ratio that works the best. Also consider the trail after and any recovery that is needed. If you charge up hill fast and are totally gassed that slows you later on then it may not be the best plan.

    So tough to have a blanket statement.
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    Stans Crest MK3s are 23mm inner. Are your Bontys also 23mm inner. Are you on the 2.2 or 2.35 XR2s?

  32. #32
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    Trek couldn't tell me the spec's, but the Bontragers are measured 27mm ext. So probably an internal around 23mm. XR2's are 2.2. I thought about going wider, but the price and weight of the Crest MK3's are really affordable. I'd rather put money into the hubs and move up a cassette to Eagle GX.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    Trek couldn't tell me the spec's, but the Bontragers are measured 27mm ext. So probably an internal around 23mm. XR2's are 2.2. I thought about going wider, but the price and weight of the Crest MK3's are really affordable. I'd rather put money into the hubs and move up a cassette to Eagle GX.
    Ignore eb. To him, wider rims solve all mtb problems.

    You are going to have to play with your body position to be able to charge up climbs aggressively while standing to keep traction on the rear tire.

    Preferably, session that climb until you find what works. Side benefit: sessioning climbs makes you faster.

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    Any race over 15 sec he has to spread his energy, he can sprint before or after and be sure not to push his max when traction is minimal. Wider rims are slower so no good in XC. Just like extra grippy tires. Off course over some months in practice he can search and find his optimal position.

  35. #35
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    The optimal rim width, ime, for a XR2 Team 2.2 for sidewall support is around 30mm inner. I've run that tire since 2014 on 29.6 and 30mm inner width rims on a carbon hardtail. On that width rim you can reduce your pressure to below 20psi, possibly as low as 18 for a rear. The exact psi will depend on your weight and terrain. You can be limited by the combo of bike speed and how rocky/rooty the worst segment of your ride is for rim hits. If you're not getting rim hits in the rockiest spots reduce pressure until you are. Then add a pound. Guys add a rim protector like CushCore so they can go lower in pressure on wide rims when they have higher speeds to deal with.

    The XR2s are designed for Trek by Frank Stacy Testing for wide rims, low pressure and max traction from a big footprint. They are higher volume with a more rounded tread pattern profile.
    https://flowmountainbike.com/feature...rubber-wizard/
    When you put this design on a wide rim the sidewall support lets the 120tpi very flexible sidewall crinkle down instead of fold over at lower pressures when you add torque. Like when you climb or change your line in a curve.
    This gives you a big conformable footprint for maximum traction. When you compare this to the same tire at 24psi on a narrower rim you can think of it like airing down your Jeep tires to go rock crawling. You're going to have more capability from your vehicle at lower pressure. You still need good body weight positioning and smooth power application techniques. You'll still reach limits. You'll have more traction to work with.

    The 2.35 XR2 Team is matched to a 35mm inner and Mikesee in Park City is running the 2.6 new XR2 Team on 40mm inner rims. You can mix rim widths and tire widths front to back, also. Most non Boost RockShox and Fox forks will take the 2.6 XR2.

    I've had the 2.2 on a 30mm inner rim as a front tire as low as 11.5psi. The footprint and traction were phenominal but rim hits were too much by far so 14 is my standard for a front. You have to experiment to get what works for you.

    I use carbon rims from CarbonFan for good stiff but still comfortable builds with Sapim Laser spokes. They keep wheel weight down in the reasonable range. I don't mind a few grams to gain more cornering and climbing speed. Overall I come out ahead with much better control over how my tires behave when pushed to lose traction.

    If you want to test this with your current rim width air down your rear to 18 psi at the bottom of your tough climb. You'll be ok at low climbing speeds going mostly straight. When you get to the top go back up to 24 with a hand pump.

  36. #36
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    As a SS HT and HT geared rider I have to agree with JoePAz. I catch and pass many riders on climbs on my SS. I know part of this is about pacing and what has to be done to make a SS keep moving, but there is something to be said for picking a gear and sticking with it. My experience is that it is almost never better to shift mid climb unless the terrain changes drastically.

    I can't tell from the info you have given in this thread how long or steep the areas you are experiencing spin really are. These things are nearly impossible to put into words anyway.

    I seem to have more questions than answers:

    Are other riders of similar fitness and strength on similar equipment making this climb faster? Are you sure?

    Will you be riding an event on the climbs in question again? If so can a spectator shoot video so you can analyze one of the climbs?

    Or can you session it with a friend and shoot video? The ideal would be to ride with a friend that can perform the way you want to. Then you can session the climb a few times and get video of both.

    If you can session the climbs or another one that is similar I would mess with tire pressures too. My approach is simpler. Let our a few psi and see if it improves. If it does, decide if you can live with that pressure for the entire race. If yes, great, if not you haven't found a solution yet.

    Finally, I have to say I appreciate your attitude. It is refreshing that your first thoughts are to improve what you are doing and to not just blame the equipment and throw money at the problem. When I ride in a group of fast riders I'm always amazed at how fast and capable modern mountain bikes really are. I notice that a skinny tire 29er, a plus tire bike, HT, FS, and SS can all really hang neck and neck for miles and miles on single track. Sure equipment matters, but sometimes it is more about the rider than anything.

  37. #37
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    Tire selection and pressure have very little to do with any of this. It's 99% technique. Chose a harder gear and get more weight on the rear tire. This technique is tricky indeed!

    The only equipment selection that might help is to change the position of your hands with a change in handlebar or stem.

    Core strength is vital here. If you can't stabilize the bike as it is braced between your hands and feet by means of locking down your core, you're not going to make it. Start doing bridges, planks, Russian twists, etc to start getting stronger. That will help immensely.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Seated climbing is why I ride Selle SMP saddles on my mountain bikes. By far, the most taint friendly saddles I've ever ridden. The only time I leave the saddle while climbing is if I have to lunge the bike forward over an obstacle.

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    These saddles only make sense. Definitely on my to buy list.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by adaycj View Post
    Will you be riding an event on the climbs in question again? If so can a spectator shoot video so you can analyze one of the climbs?

    Or can you session it with a friend and shoot video? The ideal would be to ride with a friend that can perform the way you want to. Then you can session the climb a few times and get video of both.
    Yes, definitely. Video is a great tool for sessioning stuff. So is sessioning stuff with a group of experienced riders. Especially if some of those others are able to clear that spot easily and can watch you and provide advice. In a pinch, you can even do this solo. Set your phone or other camera up on a tripod like the Gorillapod, or on a tree that has a good view of the spot where you have trouble. Record, then ride. Bonus if you do it multiple times. You can sit and watch and analyze your different attempts. Extra points if you can find video of other people on the same spot online.

    eb would probably tell this guy that he needs wider rims and lower tire pressures to solve his troubles. Here's how he made it...lol

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    Thanks to all for great discussion and tips. I'm very fortunate in that this XC trail system is within 200 yards of my house, so the opportunity to sessioning is right there. Putting together the info I'll try some changes.

    The first climb is 0.5 mile long about 250 ft gain, with a ramp up near the top. The steepest section is about 30 feet and softer than the rest. First I'm going try gaining more speed in the entry to that section, then stay seated for the soft part with nose of the saddle technique. I've ridden this many times on FS using this technique and never slipped, so reversing my approach may be all I need.

    The second steep section has an A and B line. The A line is around 50 ft very steep with a couple rocks to navigated. One rock section right at the start that you have to roll hard to not loose momentum. On the FS I've only made this climb twice out of a dozen or so attempts. With the HT and 29" wheels I'm hitting it faster and charging while standing. I slip out, but just keep churning. I think it's a matter of gear choice and I should just session it, trying a slightly lower gear and with weight positioning, hands pulling down.

    Regarding air pressure - I'm hesitate to drop too low because I think it would be slower for the majority of the race courses. I'll try a couple pounds in the rear and experiment.

    And of course strength and conditioning is always the most important. I'm having so much fun on the HT that I'm riding harder and longer sessions. Having fun trying to get PR's on the many defined segments of the trail system.

  41. #41
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    Let see 1/2 mile and 250 feet comes to about 10%. This not a short climb. Stuff like this I do in a low gear on my geared bike and on my Singlespeed I just grunt it out. What is impossible to know is the terrain. Smooth vs rocky and how slippery the dirt is.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  42. #42
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    Has anyone mentioned concentrating on pedaling in circles? On looser techy climbs you have to pay attention to keeping torque even throughout the stroke. When you get tired and careless, thats when youre more prone to blowing off the tire. Some people feel that oval chainrings will help with this (I personally do) but not everyone subscribes to that idea, and regardless, youll want to develop the technique before covering it up. I also think tire selection and pressure plays a significant roll in this. Even with plus tires, I vary my tire pressure by a couple psi depending if I want the emphasis on fast rolling, vs uphill traction.

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    Tip of the saddle in the taint, spinnning smoothly in the smallest reasonable gear you can, and weight shift/pull the bars to lever the rear wheel into the ground each pedal stroke... All or in any combination that works.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitsBoy View Post
    Has anyone mentioned concentrating on pedaling in circles? On looser techy climbs you have to pay attention to keeping torque even throughout the stroke. When you get tired and careless, thats when youre more prone to blowing off the tire. Some people feel that oval chainrings will help with this (I personally do) but not everyone subscribes to that idea, and regardless, youll want to develop the technique before covering it up. I also think tire selection and pressure plays a significant roll in this. Even with plus tires, I vary my tire pressure by a couple psi depending if I want the emphasis on fast rolling, vs uphill traction.
    IME, that all goes to hell the second you are riding anything that isn't completely smooth. Easier to do just cruising along slow by yourself, but in a race? Not in my experience, unless we are talking more like endurance type stuff.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    IME, that all goes to hell the second you are riding anything that isn't completely smooth.
    OP was talking about steep climbs on XC races, so I assumed fairly smooth to some ruts and roots. But yeah, pedaling through a rock garden, its difficult to use finesse.

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    I put much of the advice offered here into action last night while experimenting on various climbs. Standing climbing while pulling down on the handle bars and slightly shifting my weight did improve my traction - but not significantly on the steep lines. I was better off planting the taint on the end of the saddle and pedaling in the appropriate gear. I'll continue to improve the standing technique, but mainly I'm learning when to apply it. Developing the racing strategy will keep me from wasting energy in sections where I should just grind through, saving energy for sections where you can add more speed. Fun! I'm looking forward to next racing season with better results in my age group.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Let see 1/2 mile and 250 feet comes to about 10%. This not a short climb.
    Yeah, that's a short climb. 6 miles is not a short climb. 1/2 mile is.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by russinthecascades View Post
    I put much of the advice offered here into action last night while experimenting on various climbs. Standing climbing while pulling down on the handle bars and slightly shifting my weight did improve my traction - but not significantly on the steep lines. I was better off planting the taint on the end of the saddle and pedaling in the appropriate gear. I'll continue to improve the standing technique, but mainly I'm learning when to apply it. Developing the racing strategy will keep me from wasting energy in sections where I should just grind through, saving energy for sections where you can add more speed. Fun! I'm looking forward to next racing season with better results in my age group.
    Standing up on a steep climb is pointless.... even more pointless if youíre spinning out. If guys are standing up, that tells me the climb probably isnít that steep to begin with.

    Iím an ex pro of many years, racing is all about being efficient. Spinning wheels isnít efficient. If staying seated on that climb youíre talking about means staying seated in order to find traction and be efficient .... then stay seated. Donít worry too much about what others are doing.

  49. #49
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    Happy to hear about success. Yes, learning which technique to use when is key, as is training yourself to move between the different postures seamlessly. Remember you don't need to be blowing up on the steepest hills to practice those moves.

    I found spending time on a fixie made me a much better mountain biker. Train your pedal stroke, build power, train your pedal stroke, learn attentiveness, and train your pedal stroke. You can find one suitable for about $150. Please don't buy one that has no brakes.

    On the steepest climbs you'll find youself working the back for traction while the front is wandering. If it doesn't throw the performance off too much, slowing the rebound in the front can calm the whole bike down. It might be worth experimenting anyway.
    It's not hate, more like disdain

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yeah, that's a short climb. 6 miles is not a short climb. 1/2 mile is.
    5 Minutes is not a short climb. 30 second to 2 minutes is short. 10-30 minutes are longer climbs. Also consider most XC races are 60 minutes to 3hrs. So you will not have a 30 minute steep climb on a 60 minute course.

    How to approach 30 second to 2 min effort is different how you approach a 10-15 min climb and is different from a 45 minute climb.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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