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  1. #1
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    I've performed countless searches on MTBR and on Google and can't seem to find an answer...

    During my most recent ride, during tight turns and switchbacks, my rear tire has been skidding or sliding out from under me. The tire was replaced less than a month ago, so the treads are in very good condition. So, what could be causing the wash out? Could it a symptom of low tire pressure or too much tire pressure or is it technique? During the turns I am not touching the rear brake so its not that.

    Thanks in advance for any insight....

  2. #2
    Two Wheel Off-Road
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Switchback? It's not the tire, it's you. Just work on putting your weight more on the rear as well as slow down a bit. There's no way around this to correct way to clean tight switchback is to do it slowly and cleanly.

    Switchback usually place on steepish terrain do when you descends if you are on the saddle your mass is too far forward, hovering your butt about over the back of the saddle or over the rear axle or tires would do the trick.

  3. #3
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    Are you on a full suss? If so, make sure you have the proper air pressure in your shock.

  4. #4
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    What tire are we talking about? Same tire up front? Terrain/location?
    Round and round we go

  5. #5
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Quote Originally Posted by VanillaEps View Post
    I've performed countless searches on MTBR and on Google and can't seem to find an answer...

    During my most recent ride, during tight turns and switchbacks, my rear tire has been skidding or sliding out from under me. The tire was replaced less than a month ago, so the treads are in very good condition. So, what could be causing the wash out? Could it a symptom of low tire pressure or too much tire pressure or is it technique? During the turns I am not touching the rear brake so its not that.

    Thanks in advance for any insight....
    Yes, all of that. Plus going too fast.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanillaEps View Post
    I've performed countless searches on MTBR and on Google and can't seem to find an answer...

    During my most recent ride, during tight turns and switchbacks, my rear tire has been skidding or sliding out from under me. The tire was replaced less than a month ago, so the treads are in very good condition. So, what could be causing the wash out? Could it a symptom of low tire pressure or too much tire pressure or is it technique? During the turns I am not touching the rear brake so its not that.

    Thanks in advance for any insight....
    Depends on the soil conditions as well. For example, here in the Midwest we are in transition from the wet season to a very dry and hot season where all the singletrack is baked and a lot of the corners are like cement. So much so, that you see black tire rubber marks on corner sections from people braking. I can't really recall seeing that very often in these parts, but I've seen a lot of it in the past 2 weeks due to conditions. I hear lots of skidding, sliding, etc... during races at the moment in the conditions. This soil will eventually turn into loose soil as things continue to dry out, or if it rains, things will soften up a bit and take care of it.

    Running minimal tread or low knob height tires will require lower psi and you have to avoid over-braking, or braking too late into the turn (or as others have said - slow down a bit). On the other hand, if racing and keeping speeds high, it's not uncommon to allow your rear tire to slide or drift through the dry corners in a controlled manner.

    What psi are you running in your rear tire and what tire is it? Depending on your weight, type of tire, there's probably a good range that will improve your rear tire performance (mine is 21 - 27 psi for the rear).

  7. #7
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    I'm running S-Works Renegades in both the front and the rear. I'm riding a Niner Air9 RDO HT. I'm not sure how much PSI I'm running in the rear. Maybe that's something I should know...but its definitely got more air than the front. But I do pump up the rear to a little over 2 bars or 32 PSI, which now, in retrospect, is probably too much. I weigh 180 lbs.

  8. #8
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    32 psi imo doesn't sound like too much but terrain and riding style play a role. I'd go up to 35-37 and try. Isn't it better for the rear to brake loose first anyway?
    There's some more aggressive tires for sure and that tire isn't very durable but light and would think it's considered by most a race only tire because of that. Don't know the width you're running or what your bike can fit but maybe go wider for more ground contact.
    Round and round we go

  9. #9
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    I'm running the 1.95' width tire.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanillaEps View Post
    I'm running S-Works Renegades in both the front and the rear. I'm riding a Niner Air9 RDO HT. I'm not sure how much PSI I'm running in the rear. Maybe that's something I should know...but its definitely got more air than the front. But I do pump up the rear to a little over 2 bars or 32 PSI, which now, in retrospect, is probably too much. I weigh 180 lbs.
    I run the 2.3 Renegades on my JET 9. More volume, so lower psi than you. 27.5 will skid, slip and slide. 24-25 takes care of that (for the most part) as does not using the Pro Pedal to keep my tires glued to the trail. I'm your weight as well. 32 psi is pretty high. I'd say drop down in the 20's. Start with the NoTubes recommendation formula of your weight divided by 7. Add 1 for the rear, and subtract 1 for the front. So 25.71 psi is 180/7, you could try 26.5 rear, 24.5 front and see how that feels. Adjust from there (my guess would be a hair lower would help).

    After that experiment...

    The Renegades are a minimal tread XC race only tire. It's hard to imagine them not skidding/slipping/sliding/drifting with these tires at times - especially if you are at 32 psi!!!!. That's the nature of the beast for such tires. If you want to avoid all of that, lower your pressure - or you'll have to mount up some other tires with bigger biting knobs.

  11. #11
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    It could be your technique, it could be that there is a better tread design for your terrain than you are using, and it's almost certainly related to the conditions being drier/looser/dustier at this time of the year.
    ...and proud member of the anti-sock puppet desolation

  12. #12
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    It most definitely is looser, drier, and dustier. It hasn't rained in our area, significantly, in weeks. But after reading all these responses, I neglected to perform a proper BAR to PSI conversion to determine the right amount of air to place into my tires.

    Ultimately, its probably a combination of the conditions, air pressure, technique and tire. But, I'm going to try playing with the air pressures and see if I can at least get a hold of one of those variables.

  13. #13
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Quote Originally Posted by VanillaEps View Post
    It most definitely is looser, drier, and dustier. It hasn't rained in our area, significantly, in weeks. But after reading all these responses, I neglected to perform a proper BAR to PSI conversion to determine the right amount of air to place into my tires.

    Ultimately, its probably a combination of the conditions, air pressure, technique and tire. But, I'm going to try playing with the air pressures and see if I can at least get a hold of one of those variables.
    The Renegade 1.95 is going to slide in those conditions if you are pushing the pace at all. Just what narrow low (no) knob tires do.
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  14. #14
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    If the OP is drifting without falling, then I'd have to think his cornering technique is close to flawless.

    If you "fix" your drifting problem, what's the chance that your front wheel will then be washing out on you? (a much bigger problem)

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  15. #15
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    If the OP is drifting without falling, then I'd have to think his cornering technique is close to flawless.

    If you "fix" your drifting problem, what's the chance that your front wheel will then be washing out on you? (a much bigger problem)

    -F
    True. Though to go faster grippier tires would be needed.
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  16. #16
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    My front tire wants to slide more than my rear - hardly ever have any issue with my rear tire acting crazy but my front will want to slide if I am not careful - I run 2.2 Kenda Nevegals on both front and back.

    I do tend to run higher PSI which may lower down a notch to see if that helps on the front tire.
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  17. #17
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    You're not using Armor All on your tires, are you? 'Cause that's only for the rotors.
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  18. #18
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    Specialized says 35-65 psi for that tire, and knowing how thin the sidewalls are i wouldn't go lower than 30.
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  19. #19
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Specialized says 35-65 psi for that tire, and knowing how thin the sidewalls are i wouldn't go lower than 30.
    Those pressure ranges are useless off road. On all tires.
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  20. #20
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    My front tire slid out under me once or twice during my last ride when I tried to push it during cornering, but not as much as quickly as the rear was during tight turns/uphill switchbacks.

    My rear also slid out under me on a relatively harmless off camber hill.

  21. #21
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    Rear Tire Sliding/Skidding

    Quote Originally Posted by Lawson Raider View Post
    My front tire wants to slide more than my rear - hardly ever have any issue with my rear tire acting crazy but my front will want to slide if I am not careful - I run 2.2 Kenda Nevegals on both front and back.
    FWIW, I think you could solve that by changing your weight distribution. That happened to me more often until I made a real effort to remember to keep the front wheel weighted and biting.
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  22. #22
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    I test rode a bike with a Renegade on the back once. I promised myself I would never do that again. The rear end was all over the place on loose-over-hard pack.
    ...and proud member of the anti-sock puppet desolation

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanillaEps View Post
    My front tire slid out under me once or twice during my last ride when I tried to push it during cornering, but not as much as quickly as the rear was during tight turns/uphill switchbacks.

    My rear also slid out under me on a relatively harmless off camber hill.
    You'll be much better off with pressures in the 20's. I had the formula slightly wrong. It's +2 for the rear, not what my earlier post said of +1.

    Here's the actual suggestion from NoTubes.com....

    To determine a starting tire pressure when running NoTubes tires with our ZTR rim use this simple formula.

    Rider Weight in pounds divided by 7 = x


    x - 1 = Front tire pressure in PSI

    x + 2 = Rear tire pressure in PSI


    Example: 185lb rider

    185/7 = 26.4

    Front tire pressure: 26 - 1 = 25 PSI

    Rear tire pressure: 26 + 2 = 28 PSI


    Renegades are favorites here in the Midwest for singletrack, but you do have to dial in the psi to fit your handling skills and terrain. I don't know any XC racers that are running them in the 30's. We're all in the low to mid 20's. Ditto for Ikons, Raven 2.2's, Aspens, Maxxlites, Vulpines and other minimal tread rear tires.

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  24. #24
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    Quick update:

    I tore the sidewall of my rear Renegade last week and took the opportunity to get a 2.10 Racing Ralph in the rear and swap out the front Renegade for a 2.25 snakeskin Rocket Ron. What a world of a difference. No slide outs on loose over hard.

  25. #25
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    I ride a Yeti ASR 5, and I run 25psi in the front, and 28 in the rear. I'm running tubeless tires. Sliding out could be a weight distribution factor. Even when I rode tubed tires on my Talon, before I got the Yeti, I never went higher than 30psi. I just found anything higher than that caused too many issues. If you're heading into the 40-60psi range, it's more ideal for road riding.
    P.S I wouldn't worry too much about the rear wheel sliding out during tight switchbacks. There are other people like myself that purposely lock up and kick the rear wheel out and slide around the corner. It's fun to slide in control sometimes. Use it to your advantage.

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