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  1. #1
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    prep M as general lube

    I recently used (in a pinch) some Manitou prep M lube in my seatpost, handlebar, and stem attachment points. Is there any reason why this is not a good idea? Is prep M an acceptable lube for general use or is it shock specific?
    thanks
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygeo
    I recently used (in a pinch) some Manitou prep M lube in my seatpost, handlebar, and stem attachment points. Is there any reason why this is not a good idea? Is prep M an acceptable lube for general use or is it shock specific?
    thanks
    Should be just fine. Prep-M is pretty thin for grease, and kind of expensive compared to the general-purpose stuff you can use, but no harm done. You might need to check it a little more often - 6 months instead of yearly - but the points you mention only need a thin coat, and aren't moving in relation to each other.

    I wouldn't use this in bearings, as the grease there needs to be stickier to stay between the races and bearings, but again, it wouldn't be bad, provided you checked it more often. For the most part, grease is grease, the real differences are additives and thickness.

  3. #3
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    Should be okay. Just keep it away from suspension that's not made by Manitou, M-Prep contains Lithium keep it away from non-Manitou suspension, it kills rubber seals as I've heard.

    So just be careful, try looking for any other grease.
    Bike-specific ones are better for things like bearing, etc..., because bike grease is more suitable because it doesn't have to operate in the high tempertures like cars.
    Grease with PTFE can be useful.
    And for non-moving points that require lube, try anti-seize.

  4. #4
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by jw25
    Should be just fine. Prep-M is pretty thin for grease, and kind of expensive compared to the general-purpose stuff you can use, but no harm done. You might need to check it a little more often - 6 months instead of yearly - but the points you mention only need a thin coat, and aren't moving in relation to each other.
    The grease on those points is only to prevent seizing/corrosion. Vaseline or vegetable oil would work in a pinch too.

    I wouldn't use this in bearings, as the grease there needs to be stickier to stay between the races and bearings, but again, it wouldn't be bad, provided you checked it more often. For the most part, grease is grease, the real differences are additives and thickness.
    Actually, bearing grease has a better ability to withstand the loads placed on the bearings. Lubricating grease will break down in a load application. You could use it in a pinch, but I'd replace it ASAP.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg
    The grease on those points is only to prevent seizing/corrosion. Vaseline or vegetable oil would work in a pinch too.

    Actually, bearing grease has a better ability to withstand the loads placed on the bearings. Lubricating grease will break down in a load application. You could use it in a pinch, but I'd replace it ASAP.
    I wouldn't use a "pinch" of grease on parts that need grease. If it needs grease,pack it in with lots of grease, the excess will just go on the floor.

    For me bearings have to be 'packed' with grease with PTFE, lube the chain with the suitable chain lube, cables with dry lube with PTFE, anti-seize coated on non-moving metal parts, threadlocker on really non-moving parts, those are the 'additives' I use on my bike.
    So if...
    - it's moving, pack it with grease.
    - it's cables, dry lube only. or no lube if they're coated cables.
    - it's not moving, coat with anti-seize.
    - it's very rarely moved, threadlocker on thread.

  6. #6
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    I wouldn't use a "pinch" of grease on parts that need grease. If it needs grease,pack it in with lots of grease, the excess will just go on the floor.
    Nooo, not a "pinch" of grease. "In a pinch" use ......


    in a pinch In an emergency, when hard-pressed, as in This music isn't what I would have chosen, but it will do in a pinch. This term dates from the late 1400s, when it was put as at a pinch (a usage still current in Britain); pinch alludes to straitened circumstances.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg
    Nooo, not a "pinch" of grease. "In a pinch" use ......


    in a pinch In an emergency, when hard-pressed, as in This music isn't what I would have chosen, but it will do in a pinch. This term dates from the late 1400s, when it was put as at a pinch (a usage still current in Britain); pinch alludes to straitened circumstances.
    In that case, nygeo must have been desperate, and used 'expensive' M-Prep as anti-seize.

  8. #8
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    In that case, nygeo must have been desperate, and used 'expensive' M-Prep as anti-seize.
    Yes that's exactly what he did "in a pinch".

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys. I did use the lube "in a pinch" because I really had nothing similar or desirable available. It seems to have worked very well... Im going to repack my hub bearings this week so thanks for the heads up on the PTFE.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygeo
    Thanks guys. I did use the lube "in a pinch" because I really had nothing similar or desirable available. It seems to have worked very well... Im going to repack my hub bearings this week so thanks for the heads up on the PTFE.
    I'm use a variety of lubes with PTFE, I'm not sure on their availability of the ones I use but I think Super Lube's range of lubes should be easily available in the States.
    http://www.super-lube.com/product_description.htm
    Rock'n'Roll have plenty of products with PTFE (even if it's not stated on the website)
    http://www.rocklube.com/products.html
    Finish line do have a number of PTFE-fortified lubes
    http://www.finishlineusa.com/

    I use a grease and dry lube (cool looking blue liquid) with PTFE, both aussie made and Super Lube oil also with PTFE. So the three basic lubes covered. Soon I'll be recieving Rock'n'Roll Extreme chain lube, again PTFE.

    If you don't know what I've been going on about this PTFE business: ...I prefer to use the term PTFE instead of tradenames like Teflon. PTFE is one of the slipperiest substances known to man.

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