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Thread: Powdercoating

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    Powdercoating

    I have been personalizing my Trance X and recently got the opportunitry to try powdercoating. I decided that white suspension linkages would be a nice accent on my black bike. The stock finish was anodized, so first had to remove that. Got the surface clean, removed the bearings, then prepped for powdercoating.

    I used a fairly inexpensive, beginner-level dual voltage Eastwood powdercoating system with gloss white powder and the end result looks great. It turned out a lot better than paint and it should be plenty durable.


    Bike Before


    Linkages Before


    Stripping the anodizing


    Stripped


    Into the oven!


    Coated, one of the new bearings in place






    Back on the bike

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    Looks sic!!!! do you know how much weight this adds?

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    Nice job!

    What did you use to remove the anodizing? Lye?

    -S

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    Great job, they look great. I too am curious if there is a weight difference?
    "Ideal bikes are not bought, they evolve beneath you"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kemuri View Post
    Looks sic!!!! do you know how much weight this adds?
    I didn't weigh the parts before and after but the jar of powder was 8 oz. and we used very little of it. I would guess a couple of grams, minus whatever material was removed with the anodizing.

    I used Greased Lightning degreaser to remove the anodizing. It took about an hour in the degreaser, and after that the degreaser was used up. I went through 64oz for the 3 suspension pieces. It would probably be a lot faster with lye but I didn't know where to get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jen0910 View Post
    I didn't weigh the parts before and after but the jar of powder was 8 oz. and we used very little of it. I would guess a couple of grams, minus whatever material was removed with the anodizing.

    I used Greased Lightning degreaser to remove the anodizing. It took about an hour in the degreaser, and after that the degreaser was used up. I went through 64oz for the 3 suspension pieces. It would probably be a lot faster with lye but I didn't know where to get it.
    You did a very nice job.

    I just recently quit my job at a powdercoating shop ( better job lol ).

    You probably already know a few steps like making sure you give them a nice mild acid bath after the stripping, then drying them in oven, let cool, coat and bake.

    Different oils and contaminates bubble, discolor, or even give the pain a sparkle if not cleaned properly.

    Did you use a Thermoplastic or polymer? I can't remember which was cheaper, but doing small jobs like that usually cost more then even spray painting.


    Lots of people still today have NO idea what electrostatic painting is. Did you know you can even PowderC MDF board?
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I'm surprised you could hear her complaining over the sound of the vacuum.

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    You can buy lye from a big box home improvement store or a plumbing supply house. It is used to clean drains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shawnt2012 View Post
    Did you use a Thermoplastic or polymer? I can't remember which was cheaper, but doing small jobs like that usually cost more then even spray painting.


    Lots of people still today have NO idea what electrostatic painting is. Did you know you can even PowderC MDF board?
    Thanks, we got the powder from Eastwood, not sure which type that is. It was around $10 for an 8oz jar (like I said, we barely used any of it for the 3 small parts).
    I didn't know that it was so easily done on a small scale, and most people probably don't have a spare oven.

    I have heard about the MDF powdercoating, sounds interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    You can buy lye from a big box home improvement store or a plumbing supply house. It is used to clean drains.
    Oh, the plumbing section, I didn't think to look there, I looked in the cleaner section.

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    [QUOTE=jen0910;10074777]Thanks, we got the powder from Eastwood, not sure which type that is. It was around $10 for an 8oz jar (like I said, we barely used any of it for the 3 small parts).
    I didn't know that it was so easily done on a small scale, and most people probably don't have a spare oven.

    I have heard about the MDF powdercoating, sounds interesting.


    That is very cheap, and Eastwood is a fairly reputable brand.

    Heck, you can start doing small parts for friends and make a few bucks!
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I'm surprised you could hear her complaining over the sound of the vacuum.

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    I have a question. Do you really need to strip the
    anodize to do a powder coat finish on a part? Or
    can you powder coat over the anodize?

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    I have a question. Do you really need to strip the
    anodize to do a powder coat finish on a part? Or
    can you powder coat over the anodize?
    No, You actually don't ( I am almost sure this is true and works with anodize ).

    We have coated parts before that were still painted. As long as there is no significant surface damage, deep scratches etc. then it can be done. It does some good to, the extra layer make the coat more durable.
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I'm surprised you could hear her complaining over the sound of the vacuum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    I have a question. Do you really need to strip the
    anodize to do a powder coat finish on a part? Or
    can you powder coat over the anodize?
    I wondered about that too. I suspected it was possible but I stripped the anodizing to be safe and start fresh. There was some stubborn anodizing left in a few of the cut-out areas and the powdercoating didn't have a problem sticking to it.

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    Oven Degreaser cleaner works amazing for stripping annodized aluminum
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    Also, heat parts before spraying with gun.
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I'm surprised you could hear her complaining over the sound of the vacuum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by YakimaDeathYaks View Post
    Oven Degreaser cleaner works amazing for stripping annodized aluminum
    Good to know.

    The preheating before spraying is a great tip, we did that and it helped a lot.

    Also, Aircraft Paint Remover works to remove powdercoating if you make a mistake. It takes a while, but it does work.

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