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  1. #1
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    Is it possible to restore an old leather (brooks) saddle?

    I've got a 1972 Brooks saddle that has seen better days, I am restoring an old schwinn and a saddle like this would be perfect for it, does anyone know if it is possible to restore a saddle like this or if there are any websites out there detailing such a procedure? Thank you.
    Last edited by jerms; 06-03-2004 at 12:54 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerms
    I've got a 1972 Brooks saddle that has seen better days, I am restoring an old schwinn and a saddle like this would be perfect for it, does anyone know if it is possible to restore a saddle like this or if there are any websites out there detailing such a procedure? Thank you.
    Cyclart in Vista, CA can restore leather seats - among the incredible bike restoration and painting services they offer. http://www.cyclart.com/leather.html

  3. #3
    all hail der Fuhrer Bush
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    Or, if you don't want to pay....

    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    Cyclart in Vista, CA can restore leather seats - among the incredible bike restoration and painting services they offer. http://www.cyclart.com/leather.html
    ...more than the saddle is worth to get it in shape, do this:
    -apply Proofide, more to the underside, but a little to the top, massage in thoroughly.
    If the leather is all splayed out from use, tighten the tension bolt in front. If it still splays out, punch 3 or 4 holds per side in the leather just ahead of where the seatpost clamp would be, then use a leather shoelace to pull the splayed leather back into position.

  4. #4
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    If the saddle is cracked at all it is probably not going to withstand the pressure of your weight on it and fail. No amount of Proofhide (which is Brooks product for keeping the leather in shape) will make cracks better. If you could post a picture of the saddle you would probably get some better info on if it is worth it.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  5. #5
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    You can also pick up a new Brooks Professional for around $100. Persons-Majestic They also sell Proofide.

    Brooks has maintenance tips on their website to help keep your saddle in good condition - once it's fixed/replaced.

  6. #6
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    Here are some pictures. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwheel
    If the saddle is cracked at all it is probably not going to withstand the pressure of your weight on it and fail. No amount of Proofhide (which is Brooks product for keeping the leather in shape) will make cracks better. If you could post a picture of the saddle you would probably get some better info on if it is worth it.

    Here are some pictures of the saddle, the camera isn't a very good one nor am I a very good photographer so bear with me. . .(I believe the saddle is a 1972 Brooks B-15)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    • File Type: jpg 1.jpg (81.5 KB, 1149 views)
    • File Type: jpg 2.jpg (86.7 KB, 892 views)
    • File Type: jpg 3.jpg (87.0 KB, 976 views)
    • File Type: jpg 4.jpg (80.3 KB, 829 views)
    • File Type: jpg 5.jpg (86.5 KB, 842 views)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerms
    Here are some pictures of the saddle, the camera isn't a very good one nor am I a very good photographer so bear with me. . .(I believe the saddle is a 1972 Brooks B-15)
    Ouch! Proofide ain't gonna help with that one. If you are going for the total restoration and need to have that saddle restored, Cyclart can do it but it will probably cost as much as a new seat. If you just want the bike too look like new / or new enough, I'd go for a new Brooks Professional.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    Ouch! Proofide ain't gonna help with that one. If you are going for the total restoration and need to have that saddle restored, Cyclart can do it but it will probably cost as much as a new seat. If you just want the bike too look like new / or new enough, I'd go for a new Brooks Professional.
    I will probably just end up getting a new saddle. . .the bike is a 1972 schwinn that I am going to convert to either fixie or SS. . .I'm leaning toward SS because I've had to many near-death experiences on fixies. . .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerms
    I will probably just end up getting a new saddle. . .the bike is a 1972 schwinn that I am going to convert to either fixie or SS. . .I'm leaning toward SS because I've had to many near-death experiences on fixies. . .
    Save that old Brooks. Add a old rusty beach cruiser handlebar and Presto! Your very own Picasso "Tete de Toro"
    Last edited by ssmike; 08-19-2006 at 08:04 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    Save that old Brooks. Add a old rusty beach cruiser handlebar and Presto! Your very own Picasso "Tete de Toro"

    wow, that will be much better than those lawn flamingos that my fiancee wanted to get! lol. . .

  11. #11
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    The cracking is not too bad it looks like. The old, aged look of that saddle is pretty cool compared to a new one if that is what you are after. I am going to have to say that saddle could be still used with a little home remedy. Proofhide is really nothing more than a leather prep. Get ahold of a cannister of some type of leather prep and apply it to the top and bottom of the saddle and store it in a plastic bag in a cool dry place. A couple of applications should get the saddle in good enough shape to be used for your project. It wouldn't be a good saddle for your everyday ride though. I have gotten some good used Brooks off ebay also for good prices.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwheel
    The cracking is not too bad it looks like. The old, aged look of that saddle is pretty cool compared to a new one if that is what you are after. I am going to have to say that saddle could be still used with a little home remedy. Proofhide is really nothing more than a leather prep. Get ahold of a cannister of some type of leather prep and apply it to the top and bottom of the saddle and store it in a plastic bag in a cool dry place. A couple of applications should get the saddle in good enough shape to be used for your project. It wouldn't be a good saddle for your everyday ride though. I have gotten some good used Brooks off ebay also for good prices.
    Thanks for the help, I think I will start looking on Ebay. . .I am planning on using this new bike as a commuter about 2-3 times a week (because I also have another commuter :-), so the saddle would definitely be seeing a lot of use. . .

  13. #13
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    one last thing you could do

    Quote Originally Posted by jerms
    Thanks for the help, I think I will start looking on Ebay. . .I am planning on using this new bike as a commuter about 2-3 times a week (because I also have another commuter :-), so the saddle would definitely be seeing a lot of use. . .
    To waterproof the saddle and to soften it at the same time, apply Neatsfoot oil and gently work it into the leather. One of the best things you could do, if possible is take the original leather off the saddle, work on the leather independantly, then when you're satisfied with its new feel/color/durability, put it back on, TAKING care to not over-tightening it, because, like some of the others said, it just might tear from so much age and wear and stretching...

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