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  1. #1
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    The phenomenon of bicycle road rage (or possibly just plain drunkenness)

    I have not been here for awhile. Injury (not bike related) forced me off my bike. But for the first time in my life, I found myself on the other side of the whole bikes in urban environments discussion and it happened in such a way that I find myself a little shaken by the experience.

    I was in Boston today, in my car with my son next to me. I was south of Commonwealth Ave and waiting at a stop light intending to make a left hand turn into the far left west bound lane of Comm Av and I was east of Kenmore Sq.

    As the light turned green for me I was making the turn. An older fellow (like me) on a bicycle was cutting across all the westbound lanes of Comm Av, coming from a one way where he had been riding in the wrong direction. He was cutting an arc across the lanes and I was looking where my car was driving and also glancing over just to make sure a car traveling on Comm Av was not running the light. I was the first car in the line of traffic making that left hand turn. So I was the most vulnerable to a car running that light.

    Anyway I had not more than a split second to see this guy as he arced into the far left westbound lane and right in front of me. I just barely missed him and by rights there was likely more of a chance that I was going to hit him than miss him.

    He is riding a single speed bike which I actually think is dangerous as all heck for an older guy (no leg strength) and no gears to help him ride away from a bad traffic circumstance. In his case, he was riding too slowly, in the wrong place and his inability to generate any speed caused him to cut a ridiculously wide arc as he crossed all the westbound lanes of traffic.

    Here is where the "other side of the coin" part of the story comes in. While I did not hit him, he was furious. First he insisted that he was in the bike lane. Well the bike lane was clearly marked and about forty feet from where we were and all the way over to the right of the other westbound traffic lanes....where it always is I might add. He was never in the bike lane unless you want to count the time it took him to cross the bike lane as he crossed all of the westbound lanes of Comm Av. Frankly, since he was clearly lying as opposed to being confused about where the bike lane was, he lost all credibility in my eyes at that point.

    He became very abusive insisting that he was not going to move from that spot. So there we sat. Me and all the traffic behind me that was trying to make that left hand turn. In the middle of his tirade he claimed that he could see police officers "right over there" and that he was going to call for one. I said please do. My son was in the car with me and under the circumstances, I really did not care what he was saying to me as I had to do whatever was safest for the kid. You might find it hard to hold onto your temper in a case like that but, remember, you are going to leave your kid with no good options if you make a poor choice at that point. Remember also that the first thing people will ask you if you do make the wrong choice is, didn't you think about what would happen to your kid?

    So at any rate, it becomes obvious that he is not going to get a police officer and he finally moves farther left leaving me enough room to get past him. Remember, to this point nobody has hit anybody....there is no accident to report.....nothing more than some silly words exchanged. So as I drive past him, he takes his bike lock and swings it, crashing it into the side of my car. While I knew he had hit my car with his bike lock, with no police officers in view, I figured the safest thing to do was to just drive away from it and deal with it later. Again my kid is sitting in the car next to me and this guy has been anything but sane or rational to this point. As I said earlier without knowing his exact age, he was an older fellow like myself. Guys our age often:
    a) think the world owes us something
    b) are adamant that we are right even when we don't have a leg to stand on

    I actually think that he was either drunk or is like this all the time, which is even scarier.

    I think one of the issues is that bike riders are not going to win this battle. Having been on both sides of the saddle, I completely understand the desire to ride safe and to be considered as more than road furniture by car drivers. However, if bike riders are going to simply believe the bike gives them some special privilege to completely ignore common sense, safety and the rules of the road, they will lose. They will lose individual battles on the street and land in hospitals or morgues regardless of who is in the right or wrong. Ultimately they will find cities passing ordinances against riding in certain parts of the city or at all and they will be steamrolled by the political process when they try to stand in the way of such ordinances.

    I suspect that just like drunk drivers that drink and drive over and over and over again...this guy has run roughshod over common sense and the rules of the road over and over again on his bike, ends up in these road conflicts on a regular basis and simply can't handle it on the one hand while being unwilling or unable to smarten up on the other end.

    I don't know what the answer is. But I do think this is a losing battle for bike riders. Whatever political clout we think we have, it is literally nothing...less than nothing when compared to the power the other side can bring to bear. I don't even know if there is a moral here. Maybe if there is a lesson it is for other parents in regards to what they might do in a case where your kid may share the risk you are creating if you make a really bad decision about what to do with a guy like this on the road.

    However, if you know a rider like the guy I shared this conflict with today, I would get together with other friends, take him aside and read him the riot act. These are the kinds of people that are just going to make it impossible to stop some cities from just saying enough already!!! We don't need this aggravation. Bike riders simply do not add enough to our economy to side with them against drivers of cars.

    It is realizing how whacked out this guy was that made me decide to start this thread as I was really shaken by the whole experience. Road rage in a car by its very nature has limits. You are in a car....the people or person you are mad at is in a car. There is just so much that you or he can do. But a bike is a different story. There are no minor fender benders when it comes to conflicts between cars and bikes and there is the chance that two combatants can remain close enough for the conflict to elevate to truly unreasonable levels. These nut jobs are not funny and frankly they should not be tolerated by either other bike riders or car drivers. As I said before, I think the bike riders have more at stake here. If anyone is going to be forced off the roads it is them, not the car drivers.

  2. #2
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    I find that picking up your smart phone, smiling, and taking a picture of the "offender" (while saying something like "smile, captain happy") does a lot to alter the dynamic.

  3. #3
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    I thought about snapping a shot of him spitting on the car and ranting away. But I simply could not take the chance that it would set him off again on another tirade and that he might possibly try to get the phone. I just could not risk it with my kid there.

    To that point he had not acted sanely or rationally. You can get a sense for someone's ability to cope even when they are angry and I did not get that sense from him at all. The sense I got was of a guy capable of doing anything, completely out of control, awash in his own selfness because he has already cut himself off from society generally....possibly a life long sociopath now in his sixties. That is a hell of a long time to be a sociopath.

    Just realizing that he was going totally off the deep end in front of my kid to me spoke volumes to how isolated from society he must be. It does not matter what he thought of me or how much self righteous indignation he had roiling inside of himself. That sort of behavior in front of a child is as uncivilized and inappropriate as it gets. When we stop caring about the data points we are force feeding our kids and their little computerized brains, we stop caring about our own future. People willing to do that simply do not care that they may be fostering a generation of societal outcasts also capable of doing anything.

    If he finds himself someday taken off his bike and beaten bloody and half dead by a gang of young thugs that are so desensitized that the world has been broken down to 1's and 0's that are all about how vulnerable a potential victim looks to them.....it won't even matter if what they can take from him is just a few paltry belongings. They are many, young, strong and tough and he will be old, alone and frail and that is the only math they will use to determine his fate. Laying in a pool of his own blood, he won't even realize that he will have become a victim of the wreckage he himself wrought.

  4. #4
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    Sounds like a guy who was looking for a confrontation...unfortunately you were on the receiving end. I compliment you on not over reacting and making it worse. Not sure I would have been able to keep my cool the way you did.

  5. #5
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    Well as I said earlier, many of us in MY age category are feeling a bit disenfranchised with some in a sense feeling "entitled" at the same time....something of a dangerous combination to begin with. So I get that though he might not have thought that through.....AT ALL! Add to that the very real possibility that this guy gets caught in these sorts of situations far too often. If all true regarding his particular situation, he is a loaded gun looking for somebody to pull the trigger as you suggest.

    Just some of his insults suggest he looks in the mirror and sees something or somebody other than who or what he has become. He called me an "old man" and "a bit pudgy" as he looked through the window of my car and before his initial insults did not get the desired result and escalated. But he is clearly my age or older and at least my weight if not heavier and he is riding the wrong type of bike in the wrong places and at the wrong times for who he has become. Neither he nor I have the leg drive anymore to push out of a bad situation with a single-speed bike. When I was riding regularly before my injury I might have had enough leg drive to give single speed a go but not on the streets of Boston even in my best riding shape. Nether he nor I are in that kind of shape at this point. It just is not going to happen and even I would be a road hazard on the streets of Boston on a single speed bike even putting everything else aside.

  6. #6
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    Idiots/mentally ill abound everywhere, even on bikes...
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  7. #7
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    IMHO you're spending too much time analyzing an encounter with a wacko. You did the right thing to get yourself and your son extracted from the situation with as little interaction with aforementioned wacko as possible, but otherwise there's not a lot you can take away from this that is relevant to dealing with "normal" people - even those who might be acting irresponsibly while operating their bikes.
    Nuke the entire site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

  8. #8
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    Called the insurance company today. They will send an adjuster. I will pay something for the repair...they will pay something for the repair and that will be that. I would not have wanted this character knowing where I live etc. So, paying part of the repair is a small price for driving away with limited knowledge interchange. At the end of the day it was just hard to deal with having unintentionally almost killed somebody....whacked or not. The kid seemed to handle it pretty will and ended up figuring out for himself that if anything the guy might have been a few slices short of a full loaf. Once I calmed down from almost ending somebody's life, I just cared that the kid took something positive from it.

    Strange things happen in our public schools these days. People that are disoriented and not knowing where they are get to a side door that happens to be unlocked ...We like to think all the possible entrances are covered via video or live personnel. But they are not. It was a good lesson for him in the difference between anger and disorientation/instability. Maybe a small price to pay if he is better prepared to know when to just walk the other way and or know when to pick his twin sister up by the nap of the neck and carry her the other way with him.

  9. #9
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    I should have mentioned this earlier as I am sure some of you would have been interested and you probably already guessed....yes sports fans....NO BIKE HELMET....crossing all the westbound lanes of the widest, straightest, fastest intersection of the city of Boston in a single bound, against the lights, with no bike helmet, totally convinced that he will belligerent his way out of any jam he gets into.

  10. #10
    dwt
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    The phenomenon of bicycle road rage (or possibly just plain drunkenness)

    Quote Originally Posted by jugdish View Post
    Idiots/mentally ill abound everywhere, even on bikes...
    So true. And idiots on bikes make riding tough for normal folks on bikes, as they exacerbate the resentment too many motorists have for bikes.

    This idiot is sure to get his comeuppance as soon as he tries to pull that routine with an idiot in a car. Hitting some people's cars with a bike lock can get you killed in many places, including Boston. I'd say he got off too easy this time. too bad for him , as it sets him up for next time when he is much less likely to be able to pedal away.




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  11. #11
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    IMO opinion having gone through it, all it will take is a single male driver with an attitude and without the responsibility of a child in his car or worse for him a car full of guys with attitudes that will just get out and beat the living daylights out of him and his bike. I doubt somebody getting out of the car with ill intention will let his bike survive either to get him off the road.

  12. #12
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    After reading your description of the guy, I am not surprised that he smashed your car with his lock. That right there is worth a police report and/or a photo of his grimy mug.

    In fact, I have been known to call the police about fixietards doing dumb $hit on their bikes in traffic. A lot of police just don't care. I've seen idiots doing dumb crap on bikes IN FRONT OF police offers, who just drive away without even telling them what they're doing wrong. Salmon riding. Unlit in the dark. Weaving through traffic. Running lights. Yeah, it makes motorists mad that bicyclists do these things, but really they should be equally, if not more frustrated with the police for ignoring it.

    I am an occasional bike commuter so I have a decent idea of both perspectives. People like that guy are nothing but selfish. Possibly even sociopaths.

  13. #13
    dwt
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    The phenomenon of bicycle road rage (or possibly just plain drunkenness)

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    After reading your description of the guy, I am not surprised that he smashed your car with his lock. That right there is worth a police report and/or a photo of his grimy mug.

    In fact, I have been known to call the police about fixietards doing dumb $hit on their bikes in traffic. A lot of police just don't care. I've seen idiots doing dumb crap on bikes IN FRONT OF police offers, who just drive away without even telling them what they're doing wrong. Salmon riding. Unlit in the dark. Weaving through traffic. Running lights. Yeah, it makes motorists mad that bicyclists do these things, but really they should be equally, if not more frustrated with the police for ignoring it.

    I am an occasional bike commuter so I have a decent idea of both perspectives. People like that guy are nothing but selfish. Possibly even sociopaths.
    A lot of police wrongly believe that cyclists don't belong on the road, as do most drivers. And don't give a crap what happens to them. Wrong. In most states, bikes legal on the road and required to follow rules of road. And illegal on sidewalks. In NYC, you will get ticketed for riding on the sidewalk, but possibly doored by car illegally stopped in bike lane. Either way, cyclist is fu**ed.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  14. #14
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    There was a bike fatality in Cambridge Ma. involving a car door incident. I would never and I mean never open my door into the oncoming car traffic lane without first checking my rear view mirror...for my own safety! Why drivers need to be reminded of that as a means to keep bike riders safe is beyond me. Frankly it is so engrained in me that it does not matter where I am or how much room I have to open the door I am checking my mirror first and I am checking it long enough to make sure there is nobody in my blind spot when I check.

    At any rate the designer of the Cambridge bike lane apparently went out to either Harvard Square or MIT after the accident to see for himself how it appeared to be working. Apparently he had created a car door section within the bike lane. He was dismayed to find bike riders riding right down the car door section seemingly without thinking about it. But in all honesty, the natural inclination for a bike rider in traffic is to push as far right as he can.

    The result of the designer's day trip apparently (and please anybody that knows more feel free to contradict me on this one if I am wrong) is that he is going to bring before Cambridge a modified design for the bike lane as he himself is not happy with how it is being used apparently across a broad range of bike riding topics. That apparently is what really threw him. He was not just unhappy with the car door thing but pretty much everything he had thought his wonderful design would resolve.

    Honestly and again I have been a rider only taken off my bike via non-bike related injury....If you are not going to as a community bring the bike riders in and force them to understand what you have designed, what right do you have to complain if they are not using it the way you intended and I don't mean some public notice in the newspaper. That does not cut it and we should demand more regardless of what side of the saddle we sit.

    As much as I hate to say it or even suggest it, I think for the larger urban centers, communities are going to have to demand some sort of licensing for bike riders killing two birds with one stone.
    1) make people prove that they have enough of a sense of societal responsibility and accountability to come, learn what they are supposed to learn and get licensed. If your not willing or more importantly in the case of the numbskull I had issues with this past weekend not able to do that, you don't get to ride in my city. I would not think this worthwhile in suburban or rural areas. But if people are going to ride in heavily congested urban centers then they need to come in with the bike they are going to ride and prove they deserve the privilege. The license would have to be mounted to the bike....no license...immediate stiff fine levied. Police would have a ready, easy to understand law that allows them to write tickets...no license for the rider mounted on the bike, your ticketed.

    The guy from this weekend would miss at least three appointments in a row at the licensing center, flunk the next three and show up drunk for the last one. He would be dead of old age before he could get a license.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnug View Post
    As much as I hate to say it or even suggest it, I think for the larger urban centers, communities are going to have to demand some sort of licensing for bike riders
    I do not support any suggestions for licensing of cyclists, and disagree that communities "have" to do it, as your post suggests.
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    Can someone paraphrase all this for me please?!?
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnug View Post
    IMO opinion having gone through it, all it will take is a single male driver with an attitude and without the responsibility of a child in his car or worse for him a car full of guys with attitudes that will just get out and beat the living daylights out of him and his bike. I doubt somebody getting out of the car with ill intention will let his bike survive either to get him off the road.
    Yep. I love cycling. I have been a road using cycle commuter in the past. I have lots of tolerance for cyclists, even when they are ignorant or wrong. But this guy will get "his" shortly. I, unfortunately, commute alone in a cage (car). On the wrong day, this guys actions would have led me to commit criminal acts. There are many others like me, and it won't take long for this jerk to meet one.

    I commend you for having more tolerance than me. You did the right thing, and your attitude about the repair is spot on. You can't take care of your family if you are in jail, or wasting time and money on the courts. That guy is lucky he couldn't suck you into his misery.

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    As I said earlier I don't think it makes any sense for suburban or rural areas but allowing people to ride the congested urban centers just because they can get a bike and balance on two wheels is on the face of it patently ridiculous. Frankly a motorcycle is less dangerous. At least a motorcycle has power. You don't have to worry about some nut job thinking he is still 20 years old and has the leg drive to ride a single speed across the busiest and fastest of the cities intersections WITHOUT A HELMET I might add. He was unable to power that bike over the crown of the road, where he should not have been in the first place. You really want people like that wobbling across lanes of traffic? I would say good luck with that because all that will separate people from death and dismemberment will be sheer luck at the rate bike riding has risen generally. Suppose when I veered to miss this nut, I veered into another car. I have to risk my son being injured so that numbskull can just ride wherever he wants whenever he wants???

    My earlier comment still holds true in my opinion. Supporting allowing guys like that to just ride unencumbered by anything but their own common sense, which he had none of, is exactly what might one day force communities to say...enough. in certain parts of our communities we just won't let anybody ride.

    I want the sane people riding bikes. But unfortunately I think the only way to separate the sane from the insane will be to force riders to prove they are sane, know what they are doing and know what the rules of the road are in the big congested urban communities where a split second separates people from life and death and in an environment where riding is on the rise. Once you have proven you are sane, you want some proof that you have the rite and that is a license.

    My only fear would be efforts to make a licensing process widely implemented. However even as I typed the words, I know that is a red herring. Suburban and rural riding is so different from riding the big urban centers that if riders could not make that case, well see my earlier comments about proving one has enough horsepower between the ears to prove to be capable of riding in the first place.

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    You did the right thing, but not arguing further. Could have been better if you had the chance to video the incident then take that down to the cops later, at least it is on record.

  20. #20
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  21. #21
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnug View Post

    I want the sane people riding bikes. But unfortunately I think the only way to separate the sane from the insane will be to force riders to prove they are sane, know what they are doing and know what the rules of the road are in the big congested urban communities where a split second separates people from life and death and in an environment where riding is on the rise. Once you have proven you are sane, you want some proof that you have the rite and that is a license.

    My only fear would be efforts to make a licensing process widely implemented. However even as I typed the words, I know that is a red herring. Suburban and rural riding is so different from riding the big urban centers that if riders could not make that case, well see my earlier comments about proving one has enough horsepower between the ears to prove to be capable of riding in the first place.
    Here in Florida we have one of the highest pedestrian death rates in the country... and most of the time its the pedestrians fault for walking into traffic and not following pedestrian laws..

    Maybe we should create laws which require licensing for walking too!
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip View Post
    I do not support any suggestions for licensing of cyclists, and disagree that communities "have" to do it, as your post suggests.
    Agreed. And furthermore, I MUCH prefer riding my bike in dense urban centers to riding in the 'burbs. Car speeds are MUCH lower, and even though there's usually more congestion, slower speeds calm traffic enormously. Downtown, I see cars coexisting with bikes very well, outside of the idiots using either mode of transport that screw it up for the rest of us. The suburbs are a different story. Speeds are faster. There are more lanes of traffic. There's less distance between major intersections. It all makes for a much less hospitable place to ride. And I see a lot less coexistence. The cyclists who do try to brave the suburbs seem very much apart from traffic, rather than part of it like they do downtown.

    I would alter your recommendation for licensing significantly. Education is a big problem. As is enforcement. Get enforcement in line first. Police need to start ticketing people for breaking laws already on the books. To address education, there needs to be mandatory cycling content in drivers' education and defensive driving courses. Break a traffic law, and you get a citation plus a requirement to take a defensive driving course that covers a robust set of questions including content about riding bicycles, driving around bicycles, and riding bicycles around cars. It would apply to everyone, so differential treatment would not be a problem. Overhead costs wouldn't be nearly as high as licensing cyclists (which costs more to run than it generates), and requiring those who receive citations to pay for the course (which are mostly digital these days, anyway) would cover at least a large part of the costs to run it.

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    Those familiar with Boston might wonder where this rider could possibly have gone from where he was at the point we confronted each other. There are a few possibilities and one highly likely I think:
    - He could have been making for the Boylston St up ramp off Comm Av just East of Kenmore Square. I doubt that though. That would not have been a pleasant ride on a single speed at his age
    - He could have decided he would just stay out there to the left of the farthest left westbound lane headed into Kenmore Sq. That does not sound all that likely either.
    - He could have been planning to get off the bike and walk the pedestrian crossing just the other side of the Boylston St ramp, between the island in the middle and the sidewalk. This does not seem the kind of guy that would get off and walk across at a pedestrian crossing. Plus unless Kenmore Square was his destination, what was he going to do then, ride legally eastbound on Comm Av having broken God only knows how many laws on his westbound ride????? Why????
    So, by process of elimination, my best bet is that he planned on diagonally crossing all of the eastbound lanes of Comm Av, going the wrong way, right in Kenmore Sq. and during what everybody would know would be peek traffic period for Kenmore Sq.

    That is certainly the most like what he was trying to do in the westbound lanes. The only difference is that he was sort of moving in the direction of those westbound traffic lanes at the point where we met........sort of!!!!!

  25. #25
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    The phenomenon of bicycle road rage (or possibly just plain drunkenness)

    As far as he poor guy killed by the car door, he must he have been moving at quite a clip or have been extremely unlucky to have been killed. I'm thinking that if I'm riding in a bike lane in a city, with parked cars on my right and traffic on my left I'd be pedaling at a leisurely pace and paying a lot of attention to my surroundings. Not that I'd be immune from crashing and getting messed up - especially if I'm on my fixie. But death by hitting a door? High 20's mph or even low 30's I'm guessing. I'd be moving more like 11 or 12


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