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  1. #1
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    Pedal wrench vs. cone wrench

    Went to the LBS for a 9/16/15mm pedal wrench. Ended up being given a wrench made for hub nuts. Both are the same size. A wrench is a wrench if you ask me...

    Says not to use on pedals... why not? It can't be that it's too weak, they must be able to handle the same force... so why am I not supposed to use these on my pedals? I'm obviously going to regardless but I haven't found an explanation.

  2. #2
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    I reckon it is because they are too weak.
    My cone wrenches are really light and thin. I don't think they'd handle a stuck pedal at all well and I'd fully expect them to get damaged if I tried.
    There a reason they make really burly pedal wrenches.

  3. #3
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    Not to mention, pedal wrenches are usually offset to help you deal with the cranks trying to rotate as you try to work a pedal. My pedal wrench is a really nice freebie I got from Trek years ago and it's got two openings on it depending on whether I'm working drive side or non-drive side. And yes, my pedal wrench is quite burly...the metal is at least 3x thicker than a cone wrench.

  4. #4
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    If you can break the pedal lose with a cone wrench, go for it. However, I see two problems with using a cone wrench. One, it will hurt like hell (a good pedal wrench usually has a nice round area for your hand) and two, you won't have enough leverage (pedal wrenches are a lot longer).

  5. #5
    No. Just No. Moderator
    Reputation: Circlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    And yes, my pedal wrench is quite burly...the metal is at least 3x thicker than a cone wrench.
    That's the main problem I see - that the smaller surface contact area of the cone wrnech has much higher potential to deform and round out that part of the spindle flat you have the wrench on, or the wrench itself, if either are the least bit soft in the material used.

  6. #6
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    It's because cone wrenches are thin and weak. They self-destruct even when properly used on hubs. They are pretty much considered disposable tools.

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