Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    2

    Pain in the neck and back, wrong frame size?

    I am experiencing pain in the lower back and in the rear of my neck after several hour ride. Perhaps my bicycle frame is too small, however i am not sure this is only problem - see street bikes riders ride facing down a lot like in swimming you keep your head down, i cannot do that, i tend to look ahead of me 100% of the time (sometimes i ride on sidewalks, also there's holes in the road i want to spot to ride around) it just feels natural to me to know where i am going.

    I currently have mountain bike, but handle bars are flat, i was thinking of installing medium hi-rise handle bars but it might look stupid plus not sure how it will affect steering.

    Currently i am in the market for new light weight bicycle 15 pounds, so road bicycle is the number one choice, i obviously don't need a drop down handle bars just straight or medium hi-rise.

    Need more info how to select correct size frame also and any advice on the situation with the pain i get after several hour ride.

    My ride style is commuting, i am doing food delivery on a bicycle, i don't care much about, top speed and aerodynamics, usually i ride for 8 hours a day.

    Pain in the neck and back, wrong frame size?-1.png

  2. #2
    locked - time out
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    15,079
    I have an older Cannondale mtb that I've set up with slicks (Michelin City tires) and an upright bar. I use this as a commuter and it's fast and comfortable. Who cares what your bike looks like?? You're on your bike for up to 8 hours, comfort is paramount.

  3. #3
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    3,172
    Not a frame size matter, its the bad design of road bikes for anything but racing and such. Not to mention they beat the crap out of you.

    A different geometry road bike or other bike designed to sit you up more. The road cyclist riding position is really bad for back and neck which is why you see them head down and such.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.


  4. #4
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,088
    I recommend you find a professional bike fitter. There are pains that will go away as your body adjusts to what you're doing, and pains that will get worse because the bike doesn't fit you. You won't know which is which until the latter are miserable, and possibly even dangerous.

    A proper fitter might charge you as much as $300, but often a cursory fit (sizing) comes with buying a bike. Most bike shops can "size" you, but a full fitter is not so common. If you're experiencing pain, get fit. If the first thing the fitter says is "this bike is the wrong size" then it's time to work with him/her on that other bike you're thinking about. Start with the right size, get it fit, and go. It's expensive, but I've never run into anyone that regretted spending the money on a good fit.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,530
    You can try shortening the cockpit - borrow a shorter stem from a friend and give it a shot.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    7,877
    This question requires the observations and expertise of a physician and a good bicycle fitter. You are not gping to get good advice for this on the internet. Find a sports physical therapist to start to see what your level of strength and flexibility are. Then get a bike fitter to help you set up the bike to work within any limitations you may have.
    Thorn in your Sidewall
    Vassago Jabberwocky

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    7,428
    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Not a frame size matter, its the bad design of road bikes for anything but racing and such. Not to mention they beat the crap out of you.

    A different geometry road bike or other bike designed to sit you up more. The road cyclist riding position is really bad for back and neck which is why you see them head down and such.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    It sort of sounds like you may have never ridden a road bike, or at least one in the last ~10 years?

    They position you to spread weight out, on damn near all road bikes except race bikes. The longer you're in the saddle, the bigger the benefit. They're really about as comfortable as a bike gets, especially for hours a day.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    7,877
    Indeed, RAKC, your ignorance of road bikes is showing. A properly fitted modern road bike can be quite comfy for all-day riding.
    Thorn in your Sidewall
    Vassago Jabberwocky

  9. #9
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    3,172
    Well look at whats in the front of my stable. 2016 trek road bike. Fitted by someone who is a doctor specializing in these areas. (Sports in general). Had to have it done by said doctor who is the one that did the surgery on my elbow. Spent WAY too much time and wasting money on parts trying to get fit right so I could do Ragbrai. All for nothing as money spent getting the fit right to be able to spend all day on the bike went beyond budget and no Ragbrai.

    What Im saying coming from him directly. If your leaned over a fair bit like many road bikes your neck angle is horrible.

    And sorry but you guys are off a good bit, ever persons body is different. And how you are able to deny that a road bike doesnt beat the hell out of you means you must live where there is nice smooth roads, a luxury I and much of the world doesnt have. I will admit I could probably ride the bike lanes/paths all around the St Louis area for days no problem. Really nice and smooth. Out here in the country and towns with 10k or less people, nope roads SUCK.

    Ill go by what a doctor that specializes in joints and sports over what people say here because those comments are by ones that fit the mold. People like me dont fit that mold and dont live where roads are nice and smooth.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.


  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    160
    If you are looking for an endurance and lightweight road bike with the most upright position, Trek Domane is probably as upright as you will get.

    As far as geometry, STACK and REACH are your most important dimensions. For an upright position, you want a high STACK number and a low REACH number.

    Gravel bikes are generally more upright, but they are usually a bit heavier than you are looking for.

    Another thing you may want to look into is exercises to strengthen your core. Core strength will take the strain off your spine. Google core strengthening exercises for cyclists.

  11. #11
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,232
    A 15 lb bike is going to be an aggressive race bike and it will not have flat bars. Unless you are doing a lot of climbing, I wouldn't be too worried about weight. Ah, I see you are in LA on a big box store bike, that's probably your problem right there. I don't know what the roads are like and if you are jumping on and off sidewalks a lot and how far your trips are but I think I would consider more of a commuter bike, no suspension but fatter tires than a typical road bike and a more upright position.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,093
    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Not a frame size matter, its the bad design of road bikes for anything but racing and such. Not to mention they beat the crap out of you.

    A different geometry road bike or other bike designed to sit you up more. The road cyclist riding position is really bad for back and neck which is why you see them head down and such.

    For me a road bike is the most comfortable bike for long (road) rides by far. The design is not bad but it's not for everyone either, as always personal preference is paramount.

    Head down? How could you see the road? Even pro riders with slammed stems and extreme drop don't ride with their heads down.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    883

    Good job!

    1. Go see a doctor. My preference would be a trusted chiropractor but to each their own. Cycling posture is by design not compatible with the human spine (t-spine). Over time and without physical therapy, a cyclist could herniate a disc. A good doc/chiropractor will set you up with stretches and exercises to correct posture and strengthen your core.

    2. Get a professional fit on your bike. Most shops and most Specialized dealers offer bike fittings on any brand of bike and any type of bike: hybrid, road, mtb, racer or enthusiast. My two biggest take-aways from my bike fit was I was using too small (narrow) of saddle . I had no idea that saddle width mattered. Secondly, my right leg is almost 1/4" shorter than my left leg. This is quite common. However, I had been dealing with a pain in my right knee for almost a decade and just chalked it up to it being "more sensitive to wind". LOL. I bought shims/spacers for my cleats and the pain immediately disappeared--I had set the saddle height correctly for my left leg but was too high for my right.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-23-2014, 11:30 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-05-2014, 11:13 AM
  3. Giant trace is a pain, back pain that is.
    By pruitt1222 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 08-23-2013, 09:28 PM
  4. Neck pain after 2 hours of riding?
    By anekin007 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-21-2011, 10:30 AM
  5. Neck/shoulder/ upper back pain?
    By Lenny7 in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-28-2011, 08:31 PM

Members who have read this thread: 5

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.