Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    208

    No such thing as Listed Bike Weight?

    I haven't shopped for a new bicycle for over 15 years. And even back then didn't pay much attention to weight.

    Now I'm hearing that the entire industry has shunned the listing of actual weight for any and all bikes? So there's no such thing as listed weight?

    I don't understand how this can be an issue (that of possible deception like somebody mentioned as the reason). It's easily verifiable. No? Because any third-party review publication can be media watchdog. Manufacturers who consistently under-list their bikes would get called out as unreliable.

    What am I missing?

  2. #2
    Particle Accelerator
    Reputation: Haint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,512
    Quote Originally Posted by solidass View Post

    (w)hat am I missing?
    A shoppe w/ a scale??
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches.

  3. #3
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
    Reputation: GelatiCruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,042
    I think they stopped listing weight for bikes because people assume that a heavier bike is inferior in quality. Also, people would wonder what makes (say) a Giant Talon worse than an xtc because the xtc weighs a few pounds less.

  4. #4
    > /dev/null 2&>1
    Reputation: Procter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,751
    This is one thing mba magazine is still good for.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    208
    Quote Originally Posted by Haint View Post
    A shoppe w/ a scale??
    What if the bike is not in stock? How to compare to one that is, to decide whether or not to order it?

  6. #6
    > /dev/null 2&>1
    Reputation: Procter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by GelatiCruiser View Post
    I think they stopped listing weight for bikes because people assume that a heavier bike is inferior in quality. Also, people would wonder what makes (say) a Giant Talon worse than an xtc because the xtc weighs a few pounds less.
    This is a great point.

  7. #7
    > /dev/null 2&>1
    Reputation: Procter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,751
    But seriously, all you really need to know is frame weight really, which is usually published on the manufacturers site. Weights for the other parts are usually available, unless the wheel set is custom, and even then its do-able as long as the spokes are name brand.

    Adding up the weight of all the components won't be perfect (you might be a quarter pound off), but it'll give you a good idea of the weight, and if you're worried about a quarter pound +/- , like Gelati said, you're putting too much emphasis on weight, because it comes at the cost of durability and ability to handle punishment.

    And, while you're at it (adding up weights) its a good educational exercise because you're also researching the parts, what they cost, and where they fit in the manufacturer's overall line of components. So, in the end, you'll have a much better assessment of the real value of the bike as opposed to buying a black box and trusting the sticker or the sales pitch. After, you'll look at two bikes and say to yourself, 'yes this bike is heavier because the fork is a 34, which is stiffer and more stable in the rough', as opposed to, 'that one is a pound heavier so it must be cheaper parts'.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    208
    Yeah, the fork top tube diameter is definitely one area where heavier is better.

    That's another good point.

  9. #9
    Warrior's Society
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5,212
    Some list weights......one do not.

    Some list weight in S size.....some in L size

    Some list weights including pedals......some don't account for pedals.

    Basically there are too many variables for many of them to list a weight.......or at least that is their excuse. There is no standard that each and every manufacturer uses to weigh bikes.
    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

  10. #10
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
    Reputation: GelatiCruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,042
    Quote Originally Posted by ddprocter View Post

    And, while you're at it (adding up weights) its a good educational exercise because you're also researching the parts, what they cost, and where they fit in the manufacturer's overall line of components. So, in the end, you'll have a much better assessment of the real value of the bike as opposed to buying a black box and trusting the sticker or the sales pitch. After, you'll look at two bikes and say to yourself, 'yes this bike is heavier because the fork is a 34, which is stiffer and more stable in the rough', as opposed to, 'that one is a pound heavier so it must be cheaper parts'.
    This. You'll get WAY more out of trying to figure out what weights are for certain components rather than just comparing whole bikes.

  11. #11
    Particle Accelerator
    Reputation: Haint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,512
    Quote Originally Posted by solidass View Post
    What if the bike is not in stock? How to compare to one that is, to decide whether or not to order it?
    Only punning! If you are buying a bike with weight as the first quality to it, online is not a better-option.

    Ask an online retailer to weigh the bike if it comes to it, but find a balanced-bike first.
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,649
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikej View Post
    Basically there are too many variables for many of them to list a weight.......or at least that is their excuse.
    How about sz. med. w/o pedals- 29.3 lbs. What is so hard about that?

    I think one reason they might not list them is because no one wants to pay $2500 for a 30 pound bike when all of their friends say that their bikes weigh 23 pounds. For better or worse it seems that riders paid a lot more attention to weight 15-20 years ago and most good bikes listed it, though it wasn't always a trustworthy number.

    I wish bike weight was always listed in the specs. If someone is foolish enough to make a purchase solely on that number then so be it but for many it would be a useful tool.

  13. #13
    Five is right out
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,177
    If you read the weight weenies section, you'd realise that there is a fair bit of variation in component weights. I've measured some of my own components, and they sometimes 10% out of manufacturer spec (sometimes lighter, usually heavier).

    There really is too much variability for a company to claim a weight for the whole bike. A bike 'company' basically only makes the frame. They don't even make the shock if it's full suss. And then, off memory, powdercoat weighs 50-100g more than anodising.

    Many companies list the weight of a medium frame with a particular shock. I'm good with that.

  14. #14
    The Original Suspect
    Reputation: HitmenOnlyInc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,592
    I think that another reason manufacturers don't list weight is because they have the right to change the specs on their bikes at any time. I have seen bikes at shops spec'd slightly different, maybe different cranks or cassette, from manufacturer's web sites. Not a big deal but it does happen.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    321
    I was looking at 1 of 2 bikes from my LBS. The LBS was able to call the mfrs and get a ball park weight. This was a factor in me purchasing the Carve since the 2013 Carve is lighter than the 2012 Carve. Basically I wanted a bike that weighed about the same or less than my old bike. In my mind, there was no reason to go to something heavier. So a 26# bike (by my bathroom scale) replaced a 25# bike (same scale).

    [QUOTE=womble;10092672 A bike 'company' basically only makes the frame. [/QUOTE]

    Many bike companies don't even make the frame, especially if it is carbon. They outsource to a handful of Taiwanese or Chinese carbon fiber companies.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Surfacecreations's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    288
    I think its very simple. I can't remember which site I was looking at but they didn't give wights and in fact said they don't as "weight should not to be used to judge a bike" or something to that effect.

    Company A sells a 22 lb. bike for X amount of dollars and company B who rides on their exclusive name comes out with a comparably equipped bike that is 26 lbs at X dollars + $500. Why doesn't
    company B advertise their bike weights.....shame. It's a fact we all pay more for less weight and there is no talking yourself out of that it doesn't matter otherwise less weight would equal less money, and it doesn't.

    If you can't find a bikes weight directly from the manufacturer, it's because they don't want you to find it. It would be the same as buying a car. If you want to know what you are really getting when you buy,
    you go to the manufacturers website and research. Imagine you start your research and realize that Nissan doesn't list their car weights any more as "vehicle weight is not as important as what the seats are
    made of and type of transmission is used." Oh I guess they know better and I will ignore the weight. Won't happen.

    The bike industry needs needs to realize they aren't kidding anybody and whether they like it or not we will find out what we need to know before buying their products.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •